Georgia Review, UGA Press Publications Included in Racial Justice Writings Database

Submitted by Camie on Wed, 04/21/2021

More than two dozen publications by The Georgia Review and the UGA Press, units of the University of Georgia Libraries, have been included in a free, open source database intended to help readers in further understanding issues of anti-racism and racial justice.

The database from JSTOR, an online library of academic journals, books, and primary sources, serves as a companion to the New York Public Library Schomburg Center’s Black Liberation Reading List, a collection of 95 fiction and nonfiction titles that range from memoirs, biographies, and essays to books of poetry, short stories, and graphic novels.

The Georgia Review to Receive $10,000 Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts

Submitted by Camie on Fri, 02/05/2021

The Georgia Review has been approved for a $ 10,000 Grants for Arts Projects award to support a special issue titled SoPoCo, for “Southern Post-Colonial,” celebrating the voices, history, and cultures of diasporic communities that have established themselves in the American Southeast since the late twentieth century. The Georgia Review’s project is among 1,073 projects across America totaling nearly $25 million that were selected during this first round of fiscal year 2021 funding in the Grants for Arts Projects funding category.

“The National Endowment for the Arts is proud to support this project from The Georgia Review,” said Arts Endowment Acting Chairman Ann Eilers. “The Georgia Review is among the arts organizations across the country that have demonstrated creativity, excellence, and resilience during this very challenging year.”

Winter 2020 Issue of The Georgia Review Now Available

Submitted by Camie on Tue, 12/08/2020

The latest issue of The Georgia Review, Winter 2020, is now available for purchase, with new work from Terrance Hayes, Arthur Sze, Jenny Boully, Samuel R. Delany, Maud Casey, and many other compelling voices.

The issue features the 2020 winner of the Review’s Loraine Williams Poetry Prize, selected by judge Ilya Kaminsky, as well as three finalists. It also showcases a selection of translated poems by Taiwanese author Sun Tzu-ping, and a long poem by the late Molly Brodak, annotated by her widower, Blake Butler. Moreover, there is an art portfolio of UGA Alumna Meghann Riepenhoff’s modern cyanotypes of the natural world, which includes an interview with the artist by Georgia Review editor Douglas Carlson.

See full table of contents at thegeorgiareview.com.

Three Libraries Virtual Events Named to UGA Signature Lecture Series

Submitted by Camie on Tue, 09/15/2020

Three UGA Libraries virtual events featuring film makers and writers have been named to the University of Georgia Signature Lectures series this fall.

The events include celebrations of the 25th anniversary of the Brown Media Archive and Peabody Awards Collection and the 20th anniversary of the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame. The third event, sponsored by the Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, introduces the new annual Food, Politics, and Power Lecture series.

Jacob Baynham and The Georgia Review Win National Magazine Award

Submitted by Camie on Thu, 06/04/2020

The Georgia Review was delighted to learn that Jacob Baynham’s essay "Jerry's Dirt," printed in the Fall 2019 issue, has won a National Magazine Award in the Profile Writing category of the 2020 National Magazine Awards for Print and Digital Media, administered by the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME). The “Ellies” awards ceremony was held virtually on May 28.

Jacob Baynham, a freelance journalist and essayist based in Missoula, Montana, has written about criminal justice for The Christian Science Monitor and about parenting for Outside magazine, and has reported internationally for Newsweek, theSan Francisco Chronicle, Slate, and other publications. “Jerry’s Dirt” chronicles the remarkable life of fiction writer Jerry McGahan, Baynham’s late father-in-law.

Spring 2020 Issue of The Georgia Review Focusing on U.S. Census Now Available

Submitted by amywatts on Wed, 04/01/2020

Coinciding with Census Day, April 1, the latest issue of The Georgia Review, Spring 2020, is now available for purchase. In honor of the decennial count, a crucial institution of the American democratic process, we are publishing a Spring issue that presents authors’ and artists’ explorations in various genres of what it means to attempt representation of the diverse communities that comprise the United States.

Winter 2019 Issue of The Georgia Review Now Available

Submitted by Camie on Wed, 01/08/2020

The latest issue of The Georgia Review, Winter 2019, is now available for purchase. Featuring 250 pages of original poetry, fiction, essays, and book reviews, some of the issue’s highlights include a tribute to the late Toni Morrison, an innovative poetry project presenting the words of Hong Kong protesters, a new story by novelist Tiphanie Yanique, an essay by conservationist Susan Cerulean, and an art folio of work by Atlanta-based artist Michi Meko. The Winter issue is the first curated by new editor-in-chief Gerald Maa, who took leadership of the Review after the July retirement of longtime editor Stephen Corey.

Living Texts: a Symposium on the Book

Submitted by cleveland on Thu, 02/16/2017

Folksinger, scholar, and creative writer Dianne Dugaw, professor of English and Folklore at the University of Oregon, will give the keynote address at the Spring Book Symposium, "Living Texts" Feb. 23.

The symposium begins at 9:30 a.m. with UGA faculty participating in a roundtable discussion on "Making Archival Material Come Alive in the Classroom."

At 11 a.m., Dugaw, the author of books and articles on early modern and 18th-century literature and culture, especially exploring gender and sexuality in folksongs, literature, and history, will speak on "Fighting and Sailing Women in Anglo-American Prints, Songs, and History (1600--present)." 

A workshop with participants examining and discussing rare books will take place at 2 p.m. following a lunch break.

All events take place in Room 277 of the Russell Special Collections Libraries.