Events - Programs

"From Georgia to California and Back: The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of Southern Gold Mining"

Dr. Drew Swanson, professor of history at Wright State University, will speak on "From Georgia to California and Back: The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of Southern Gold Miining" in conjunction with the exhibit "Gold-digging in Georgia: America’s First Gold Rush." A reception will follow.

This event is sponsored by the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts. 

Lunch & Learn, Use of the Executive Order

Civic Knowledge = Civic Power:
A Weekly Series Focused on How Congress Works (or Should Work)

The powers of the United States Congress are considerable and well established. Congress can collect taxes, coin money, declare war, raise and support armies and a navy, and make all laws necessary and proper to carry out its powers – just to name a few. But understanding Congress cannot be done in a vacuum or just through a listing of powers

Lunch & Learn, A History of the Filibuster

Civic Knowledge = Civic Power:
A Weekly Series Focused on How Congress Works (or Should Work)

The powers of the United States Congress are considerable and well established. Congress can collect taxes, coin money, declare war, raise and support armies and a navy, and make all laws necessary and proper to carry out its powers – just to name a few. But understanding Congress cannot be done in a vacuum or just through a listing of powers

Lunch & Learn, Congress and the Media: Shaping Public Perceptions

Civic Knowledge = Civic Power:
A Weekly Series Focused on How Congress Works (or Should Work)

The powers of the United States Congress are considerable and well established. Congress can collect taxes, coin money, declare war, raise and support armies and a navy, and make all laws necessary and proper to carry out its powers – just to name a few. But understanding Congress cannot be done in a vacuum or just through a listing of powers

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

woman shouting edit!

Wikimedia’s gender trouble is well-documented. In a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of its contributors identify as female. While the reasons for the gender gap are up for debate, the practical effect of this disparity is not: content is skewed by the lack of female participation. This represents an alarming absence in an important repository of shared knowledge.