Hargrett Rare Book & Manuscript Library

"White Ribbon Army: Women’s Crusade Against the Saloon"

Submitted by cleveland on Mon, 01/29/2018

“White Ribbon Army: Women’s Crusade Against the Saloon” takes a look at the Temperance Movement of the 19th century.

The exhibit, in the galleries of the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library through May, draws material from several collections and is sponsored by the Lucy Hargrett Draper Center & Archives for the Study of the Rights of Women in History & Law (circa 1550-1920).

As the United States became urbanized and industrialized, many became concerned with social issues such as poverty and the perception of declining morals. A series of social and religious reforms, including the Temperance Movement, swept the country.

Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color

Submitted by cleveland on Fri, 01/26/2018

The 2018 UGA Women's History Month keynote address will be presented by Andrea J. Ritchie. Her talk is co-sponsored by the Lucy Hargrett Draper Center and Archives for the Study of the Rights of Women in History and Law.

Andrea Ritchie is a black lesbian immigrant and police misconduct attorney and organizer who has engaged in extensive research, writing, and advocacy around criminalization of women and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people of color over the past two decades. She recently published Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color now available from Beacon Press.

Ritchie is a nationally recognized expert and sought after commentator on policing issues. 

She will speak March 1 beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Russell Special Collections Libraries. It is open free to the public.

 

Open Doors: 100 years of FACS

Submitted by cleveland on Wed, 01/24/2018

“Open Doors: 100 Years of Family and Consumer Sciences at UGA” an exhibit on the college’s centennial, also focuses on the admission of women to public higher education, UGA’s role as a land-grant institution, and how the field has grown and adapted over the decades.

The exhibit, at the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries, will be on display through June and includes publications, manuscripts, period clothing from the Historic Clothing and Textile Collection, and photographs of the first women admitted to UGA, food preservation classes, needlework demonstrations, WWII military on the UGA campus and other moments from the past 100 years.

2018 class of the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame announced

Submitted by cleveland on Thu, 01/11/2018

 Five authors comprise the 2018 class of Georgia Writers Hall of Fame inductees:  Michael Bishop, Tayari Jones and Cynthia Shearer will be admitted at the November ceremony; Furman Bisher and Frances Newman will be honored posthumously.

The University of Georgia Libraries began in 2000 the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame to honor Georgia writers and to introduce the public to the library’s rich collections for research into Georgia literature and cultural history.The ceremony will be held in November, part of the UGA Spotlight on the Arts festival. 

Papers of Thomas Carr, principle in Yazoo land fraud, digitized

Submitted by cleveland on Fri, 12/08/2017

 

The Yazoo land fraud was “one of the most significant events in the post–Revolutionary War history of Georgia,” according to its entry in the New Georgia Encyclopedia written by Chris Dobbs. “The bizarre climax to a decade of frenzied speculation in the state's public lands, the Yazoo sale of 1795 did much to shape Georgia politics and to strain relations with the federal government for a generation.”

2017 Ga Writers Hall of Fame events announced

Submitted by cleveland on Thu, 10/19/2017

A scholar of southern culture and two poets will come together Nov.  5 to discuss their craft and more at the Author Discussion Series, a moderated panel discussion and  prelude to the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame induction ceremony Nov. 6.

Moderated by Hugh Ruppersburg, University Professor Emeritus, of the UGA English department, the discussion will take place at 5 p.m.  in the auditorium of the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries. A reception will follow.