University of Georgia Libraries, Special Collections  
 
     
 


EVENTS

Upcoming Events
Past Events

Upcoming Events

Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow Program Series
January-March, 2014

On August 6, 1945, a specially-equipped American B-29 Superfortress dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. On August 9, another atomic bomb fell on Nagasaki. For most Americans, the immediate reaction to the atomic bomb was relief: it had ended the war. But as the United States celebrated, it also braced itself for the uncertain future of the Atomic Age. For the next two decades, the looming threat of Atomic war dominated American society.

Inspired by the ongoing exhibition Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965 on display in the Harrison Feature Gallery, the Richard B. Russell Library will host a series of eleven public programs to spotlight some of the most significant events of the time period and invite attendees to reflect on life in America during the Atomic Age.

All events in the series are free and open to the public. All events will take place on the 2nd floor exhibit level in the new Richard B. Russell Building for Special Collections Libraries, Georgia’s newest cultural destination. Dates and descriptions for individual events are listed below. For more information, please contact russlib@uga.edu or call (706) 542-5788.

The Alert Today Program Series was made possible with contributions from several UGA campus partners including The Center for International Trade and Security, The School of Public and International Affairs, the Department of History, the Department of English, and Film Studies

To learn more about the Richard B. Russell Library, visit:
http://www.libs.uga.edu/russell

Thursday, January 30, 2014, 7:00-9:00PM
Film Screening, Fail-Safe (1964)
Location: Auditorium (Room 271)
Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

This film series will explore cultural manifestations of nuclear anxiety and the Cold War politics of the time period. Each film in the series is curated and introduced by Christopher Sieving (UGA Department of Theatre and Film Studies). Light refreshments provided during intermission; doors open at 6:30PM.

More About The Film…
Fail-Safe (1964): American planes are sent to deliver a nuclear attack on Moscow, but it’s a mistake due to an electrical malfunction. Can all-out war be averted? Starring Walter Matthau and Henry Fonda. (Run Time: 112 minutes)

Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 5:30-7:00PM
Community Forum, America's Role in the World
Location: Large Event Space (Room 285)
Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

Since the end of the Cold War, the United States has gone from being one of two “superpowers” to being the leading world power, but there are signs that American dominance is eroding as countries like China and India grow and prosper. And new threats have emerged – pandemics, resource depletion, climate change – that no one nation can solve alone. What does all this mean for our national security and our relationships with the other nations of the world? Join us for this deliberative discussion where we weigh the benefits and tradeoffs of three approaches to this issue using an NIF issue guide. Light refreshments will be served.

Saturday, February 8, 2014, 2:00-3:30PM
Monster Movie Matinee, Them! (1954)

Location: Auditorium (Room 271)
Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

The atomic age inspired a host of science fiction movies that guessed at what new technology and the space race might bring. Join us as we screen three classic films from the 1950s exploring aliens, atom bombs, and the threat of communism on Saturday afternoons - our Monster Movie Matinee!. Series curated by Dr. Christopher Sieving (UGA Department of Theatre and Film Studies); Introduction by Dr. Christopher Pizzino (UGA Department of English)

More About The Film…
Them! (1954): The earliest atomic tests in New Mexico cause common ants to mutate into giant man-eating monsters that threaten civilization. Starring James Whitmore, Edmund Gwenn, and Joan Weldon. (Run Time: 94 minutes)

Saturday, February 15, 2014, 2:00-3:30PM
Monster Movie Matinee, The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)

Location: Auditorium (Room 271)
Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

The atomic age inspired a host of science fiction movies that guessed at what new technology and the space race might bring. Join us as we screen three classic films from the 1950s exploring aliens, atom bombs, and the threat of communism on Saturday afternoons - our Monster Movie Matinee!. Series curated and introduced by Dr. Christopher Sieving (UGA Department of Theatre and Film Studies).

More About The Film…
The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951): An alien lands and tells the people of Earth that they must live peacefully or be destroyed as a danger to other planets. Starring Michael Rennie and Patricia Neal. (Run Time: 92 minutes)

RESCHEDULED
Original date: Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 5:30-7:00PM
NEW DATE: Thursday, February 20, 2014, 5:30-7:00 PM
Panel Discussion, Nuclear Anxiety and Civil Defense in Popular Culture
Location: Auditorium (Room 271)
Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

This event will feature a panel discussion focused on the cultural impact of the atomic bomb addressing how films, fashion, and comics of the time period were inspired and shaped by both the technology and anxiety of the nuclear age. Featured speakers will include: Kirk Willis, (Department of History); Christopher Pizzino (Department of English); José Blanco F. (Historic Clothing and Textiles Collection, College of Family and Consumer Sciences); and Christopher Sieving, (Department of Theatre & Film Studies). Light refreshments will be served.

Thursday, February 20, 2014, 7:00-9:00PM
Film Screening, The Manchurian Candidate (1962)
Location: Auditorium (Room 271)
Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

This film series will explore cultural manifestations of nuclear anxiety and the Cold War politics of the time period. Each film in the series is curated and introduced by Dr. Christopher Sieving (UGA Department of Theatre and Film Studies). Light refreshments provided during intermission; doors open at 6:30PM.

More About The Film…
The Manchurian Candidate (1962): A former Korean War POW is brainwashed by Communists into becoming a political assassin. But another former prisoner may know how to save him. Starring Frank Sinatra and Angela Lansbury. (Run Time: 126 minutes)

Saturday, February 22, 2014, 2:00-3:30PM
Monster Movie Matinee, Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956)

Location: Auditorium (Room 271)
Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

The atomic age inspired a host of science fiction movies that guessed at what new technology and the space race might bring. Join us as we screen three classic films from the 1950s exploring aliens, atom bombs, and the threat of communism on Saturday afternoons - our Monster Movie Matinee!. Series curated and introduced by Dr. Christopher Sieving (UGA Department of Theatre and Film Studies).

More About The Film…
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956): A small-town doctor learns that the population of his community is being replaced by emotionless alien duplicates. Starring Kevin McCarthy and Dana Wynter. (Run Time: 80 minutes)

Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 7:00-9:00PM
Storytellers & Scholars: Life in the Atomic Age

Location: Large Event Space (Room 285)
Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

Inspired by the storytelling format of the popular radio show This American Life and co-sponsored by the Georgia Museum of Art, the Russell Library will host an event showcasing selected scholars, community members, and archival footage. The chosen theme: Life in the Atomic Age. Featured scholars will include Shane Hamilton (Departmet of History), Janice Simon (Department of Art History), Mark Reinberger (College of Environment and Design), and Callie Holmes (Oral History and Media Archivist, Russell Library). Light refreshments will be served during the event.

RESCHEDULED
Original Date: Wednesday, February 12, 2014, 5:30-7:00PM
New Date: Thursday, March 6, 2014, 5:30-7:00PM Panel Discussion, Nuclear Threats Then & Now
Location: Auditorium (Room 271)
Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

This event will feature a panel discussion focused on American attitudes toward nuclear culture in the wake of 1945 atomic bomb blasts and draw comparisons/contrasts to the current state of nuclear threats worldwide. How did the US government attempt to calm, warn, and protect citizens then? How do they approach these goals today? Light refreshments will be served. Featured speakers will include: Jeffrey Berejikian (School of Public and International Affairs); Loch Johnson (School for Public and International Affairs); William Keller (Center for International Trade and Security); Igor Khripunov (Center for International Trade and Security).

RESCHEDULED
Original Date: Thursday, February 13, 2014, 7:00-9:00PM
New Date: Thursday March 6, 2014, 7:00-9:00PM

Film Screening, Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
Location: Auditorium (Room 271)
Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

This film series will explore cultural manifestations of nuclear anxiety and the Cold War politics of the time period. Each film in the series is curated and introduced by Dr. Christopher Sieving (UGA Department of Theatre and Film Studies). Light refreshments provided during intermission; doors open at 6:30PM.

More About The Film…
Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964): An insane general starts a process leading to certain nuclear holocaust that a war room of politicians and generals frantically try to stop. Directed by Stanley Kubrick and starring Peter Sellers. (Run Tim: 95 minutes)

Friday, March 7, 2014, 9:00AM-4:00PM
First Person Project Interview Day

Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

This March the First Person Project, an oral history series documenting the experiences of everyday Georgians, invites participants to tackle the topic of security.

Inspired by the Russell Library’s ongoing exhibition, Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb, 1945-1965, the First Person Project hopes to capture stories that get to the heart of what security means to you. What makes you feel safe and secure as an individual, member of a family or community, or as a citizen living in the 21st century? Exploring the other side of the coin, what stories from childhood or adulthood best describe your fears – how you have confronted them, how they might have shaped you. How do these stories of security and fear intertwine?

Six sets of partners will be accepted for this First Person Project session, scheduled for Friday, March 7th between 9:00am and 4:00pm. Each audio recording session takes one hour to complete. Photographs will also be taken for each session. The Russell Library will archive the interviews to add to its documentation of life in post 20th century Georgia and will provide participants with a free digital download of the recording and photographs. A $10 donation is suggested for each participant pair.

For more information, or to reserve an interview slot, call (706) 542-5788, email russlib@uga.eduor visit http://www.libs.uga.edu/russell/fpp/fpp_splash.html


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Past Events

Ready, Steady, Vote!
September-November, 2012

Could your election season use a little non-partisan entertainment? Ready, Steady, Vote! a program series focused on getting citizens in the mood for the 2012 election season, was hosted in the fall of 2012. A combination of film screenings, community forums, debate watch events, and stump speeches, Ready, Steady, Vote! events took place on the 2nd floor exhibit level in the new Richard B. Russell Building for Special Collections Libraries, Georgia’s newest cultural destination.

 

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