"Maggie Growls": Women's History Month Movie

MAGGIE GROWLS is a documentary film portrait by Barbara Attie and Janet Goldwater of the amazing, canny, lusty, charming and unstoppable Maggie Kuhn (1905-1995), who founded the Gray Panthers in 1970 after being forced to retire from a job she loved. Her outrage and determination fueled a political chain reaction that forever changed the lives of older Americans, repealing mandatory retirement laws and proving that "old" is not a dirty word. Out of what political activist Ralph Nader called "the most significant retirement in modern American history," Maggie created one of the most potent social movements of the century - one that was committed to justice, peace and fairness to all, regardless of age.  (via PBS.org)

Equality Under the Law: History of the Equal Rights Amendment, an exhibit on the history of the Equal Rights Amendment will be on display in the galleries of the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library Jan. 19-May 12. 

The exhibit documents the rights of women under the law from the 17th century to present with a focus on the state of Georgia. Highlights include original suffrage pennants and letters from Susan B. Anthony; the origins of the National Women's Party; ephemera from the ERA campaign at the local, state, and national level; and materials from the anti-ERA movement and Phyllis Schlafly. Materials in the exhibit are drawn from the  Lucy Hargrett Draper Center and Archives for the Study of the Rights of Women in History and Law, circa 1550-2050.

This is event is co-sponsored by the Institute for Women's Studies. 

 

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Special Collections Library