News

Papers of ‘extraordinary’ educator, peanut champion given to UGA Hargrett Library

Submitted by cleveland on Mon, 07/24/2017

An extraordinary educator who took over operations of the family farm after his father 's death, Andrew Avery helped create the Decatur County Peanutorama, highlighting the crop and the surrounding county's contribution to its marketing.

Avery’s family has donated his papers to the University of Georgia Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, including correspondence, photographs, printed material, notes, legal documents, plats, and various ephemera.  Of note is the scrapbook documenting farm improvements he made for the Atlanta Constitution's Plant-to-Prosper contest of 1938, which he won, as well as many photographs of schools he was involved with in southwest Georgia.

New website devoted to Georgia historic newspapers available from the Digital Library of Georgia

Submitted by cleveland on Fri, 07/14/2017

The Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) has launched a brand-new website featuring historic newspaper titles from around the state. Georgia Historic Newspapers (GHN), available at http://gahistoricnewspapers.galileo.usg.edu/

Since 2007, the Digital Library of Georgia has been providing access to the state’s historic newspapers through multiple, online city and regional newspaper archives. The DLG’s newest website, Georgia Historic Newspapers (GHN), continues that tradition by bringing together new and existing resources into a single, consolidated website.

Odum School of Ecology is focus of exhibit

Submitted by cleveland on Wed, 07/12/2017

 

Celebrating its 10th anniversary—and the 50th of its precursor, the Institute of Ecology—UGA’s Odum School of Ecology, the world’s first school devoted to the study of ecology, is the focus of an exhibit at the UGA Special Collections Libraries.

The history of the school actually can be traced back to 1940 when Eugene P. Odum came to UGA as a lecturer in zoology.  Often called the “father of modern ecology,” Odum is widely credited with making “ecosystem” a household word. At UGA he led the way in establishing ecology as an academic discipline and was instrumental in founding two off-campus research groups in the 1950s – the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and the marine Biological Institute (now the UGA Marine Institute) on Sapelo Island. 

Following the first Earth Day in 1970, Odum became a major voice in the growing environmental movement.

New Exhibit Explores History of Local Preservation Group

Submitted by Russell Library on Wed, 07/05/2017

A new exhibit on display in the rotunda of the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries examines the history of a preservation non-profit celebrating its fiftieth anniversary in 2017. On display through August 25, Saving Athens: Celebrating 50 Years of the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation looks at the efforts of this local group to protect and preserve the the physical history of the Athens, Georgia. 

Circulation Services Offline From Monday, May 22 thru Thursday, May 25

Submitted by MaryP on Fri, 05/19/2017

All Circulation services provided through the UGA Libraries' current computer system will be taken offline on Monday, May 22, in preparation for our move to a new system. Only minimal Circulation services will be available at the libraries' service points on campus and at remote sites. There will be no access to any online Circulation services (online renewals, requesting, etc.) from Monday, May 22 thru Thursday, May 25. For more information, please call 706.542.3256 or email maincirc@uga.edu.

Summer Reading at the CML

Submitted by amywatts on Thu, 05/18/2017

The end of the school year means the beginning of summer reading programs. Let the Libraries help save you time & money. Borrow what you need! Summer Reading Lists for Local Schools matches the lists with what the Libraries own. The Curriculum Materials Library is in 207 Aderhold Hall and in addition to the titles on the lists we have thousands of other books, from board books for babies to Young Adult lit, which includes a lot of recent movies (The Fault in Our Stars, Everything, Everything, The Hunger Games, Twilight and, of course, Harry Potter for example) so we have something for everyone. And puppets. And fake food. :-)

Gold-digging in Georgia: America’s First Gold Rush

Submitted by cleveland on Fri, 05/12/2017

Gold nuggets, historic maps, photographs, postcards and other artifacts help tell the story of Georgia’s antebellum gold rush – which preceded the frenzy in California by two decades – in an exhibit at the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

Opening June 5, the exhibit features a complete set of Dahlonega Mint coins and illustrates how this  early development of southern industrialization, while profitable, was also destructive as it remade local economies, societies, and environments. In pursuit of wealth, miners ripped apart stream beds and hillsides, cut down forests, and erected miles of wooden flumes and towns of wooden shacks. Public and private mints sprang up to transform precious metal into currency and, with the help of the state and federal governments, speculators obsessed with the prospect of riches drove the Cherokee from Georgia.