Mining Scholarly Citations in GALILEO Research Databases and Additional Internet Resources

Initial considerations as you plan your search strategy:

1. How have you signed your papers? First and middle initials or only First? If your authorship line has varied, you must search by both occurrences, such as Benjamin, JV OR Benjamin, J (note: most databases will take you inverted name without comma but some require it). If you use a hyphenated last name, I would search it without hyphen and without space.

2. If some papers have a senior author other than yourself, you MUST search that senior author in Web of Science, but not other databases.

3. If your last name has letters that might be inverted and create a typo, you could search both ways Shingle A OR Shingel A.

4. You should look at every cite to make sure it is not a self-cite.

5. It might be more efficient to search authorlastname AND"first 3 or 4 words of the title" where the name and initials occurs frequently for multiple people.

 

An excellent widely-known resource for locating who has cited what scholarly publications is the Citation Index portion of Web of Science which includes citations ("the bibliography") from peer-reviewed journal articles in Science, Social Science and Arts and Humanities.

A brief step-by-step guide is available at Web of Science Tips.

Disciplines in the social sciences and humanities may receive few, if any, matches in citation searches in the above databases because key journals in the speciality fields are not indexed there.

But researchers in the social sciences and humanities now have access to other sources licensed by UGA and GALILEO to track this information, though none as elegantly as Web of Science. Following are step-by-step instructions for digging out the data...and "digging" is not overstating the work you'll have to do, so plan to allot sufficient time for the task.

Luckily, I can report that a number of UGA faculty have been pleasantly surprised by what they unearthed in these additional resources.

Also some additional Internet resources are rich in citations, namely Google and Amazon, which complement the citations you locate via GALILEO databases.

Book resources for citations

Before electronic access to the full-text of book contents, one was largely dependent on serendipity to learn of citations to one's publications. As never before we now have access to citations in books in three different, complementary resources. There is probably little, if any, overlap, so exploit all of them.

Even if Web of Science and other GALILEO resources have provided sufficient evidence of your publications cited in the journal literature, you may find additional cites in scholarly books via the following three sources.

1. A GALILEO resource, NetLibrary, makes book contents searchable for cited authors. Strategy is described lower on this page in Netlibrary's "box".

2. In fall 2003 Amazon introduced the "Search Inside the Book" feature which includes content and bibliographies of selected books (publishers must permit the search).

For strategy, you can search phrases in the Title of some of your works,.perhaps the first 3 or 4 words of the Title in quotes (to indicate the phrase) and your lastname. The Amazon database may be a very rich source of citations but will definitely have to be "stroked" to discover its nuggets. August 2007 update: The author lastname/title words in quotes may not be as fruitful now. Perhaps a better strategy is to search author lastname second author lastname. The matches seem to derive from the chapters and not necessarily the bibliography and the titles don't appear in the chapter/paragraphs.

Amazon Update: 8/2007 They've modified their search results page again...now you get a mix of matches with Excerpt displayed but for other matches you have to click the book link and get the "Search Inside the book" function from the book page bar on left or right..

Amazon update 1/2005: For some reason Amazon has revamped and partially buried the results of the "Search Inside the Book" functionality. Following your results list, look for a link labeled "Only the most relevant results for your search were displayed. Click here to see additional results" If you click that link, you'll see the matches to your search within other books. They'll often display an excerpt in quote marks so you can see the cite in context, and sometimes include the pages.

I don't know why Amazon buried the "click here to see additional results" link, but perhaps viewers were confused by the relationship of the matches.

3. Google has released a beta version of Google Book Search which enables searching the contents of selected books. Strategy could be authorlastname and first 3 or 4 words of title in quote marks to indicate a phrase.

More Internet resources

Google has two more resources to serve the academic community in discovering the impact of one's publications.

In Google Scholar type in "lastname firstinitialsecondinitial" (like "benjamin jv") to locate some of your publications indexed by Google Scholar. Following the bibliographic citation there may be a hyperlink labeled Cited by x number. Click that link to view websources which cite that paper. While some of these citations may also come to your attention using the GALILEO resources, there will usually be a few unique matches (just as you'll find unique matches in GALILEO databases).

In disciplines where there are numerous unpublished meetings, conferences, or presentations, you may find cites to your publications/presentations that are used in class reading lists, etc. at other universities via standard Google. Also, national and international organizations sometimes post selective bibliographies about specific subjects on the website. Usually a search by lastname, if unique, will be adequate. Or you may need to add a keyword (perhaps a word from a title) or possibly "lastname firstinitiallastinitial".

Finally, to incorporate the citations from all sources into your documentation, see my suggestions.

General/Multi-Subject Databases

Web of Science (contains ISI Citation indexes)

This is the premier resource for citation indexing and the most efficient place to begin. It indexes the contents of more than 14,000 scholarly journals in all disciplines, but there is better coverage in the biological and physical sciences, than in social sciences and arts and humanities. But I think it is the best place to begin.

Please see my detailed description of exploiting this resource.

Academic Search Complete (EBSCO)

Contains the full-text of many articles on all subjects. This search technique will locate articles by someone'slastname cited in articles which have full-text.

  • Choose Advanced Search for multiple input boxes with drop-down field designators. You can also increase the results displayed -- click Preferences; Increase Display from 10 to 50 and click Apply.
  • For an article by a specific author, type someoneslastname and select Default Fields. Unfortunately, you'll have to skip over any articles written by that person but in the following instructions you'll be able to extend the search to seek additional matches in full-text.
  • In the section Limit your results, check the box Full Text since you must examine the full-text to know which publication is cited, and also verify that it indeed the author you seek) and also check Scholarly Peer-reviewed journals if you want.
  • For Published Date: choose a range representing the year(s) one has published, for example:
    90 to 01
  • And farther down in "Expand your search to" section, check box Search within fulltext articles (this is the most important part of your search strategy).
  • Your results will contain not only articles authored by someone'slastname but also articles in which someone'slastname has been cited. For the latter, click on the html icon.
  • When the full-text displays, click Ctrl-F (Mac :click apple-f) to get the popup window for Find in Page. Type in someone'slastname and click Find button. The page will scroll to the first occurrence of the name and it will be highlighted. Click Find Next to continue moving through the document to its bibliography.

Caveats:

  • Since someone'slastname may be a common last name and retrieve many articles, you may include more specificity..but be aware you may eliminate some matches if you don't use the exact character string.
  • You might consider adding a word from the title of someone'slastname article. Occasionally you could consider the name of the journal but with so many journal titles abbreviated in bibliographies that might not be a safe search.
  • For an article by author someone'slastname, type someone'slastname and select All fields AND awordfromsomeone'sarticletitle and select All fields ).
  • Note: This is an imperfect search since someone'slastname may appear in any field such as subject or author or where you hope, full-text. If you add a second term it may appear in the title of the citing article or in subject or keywords, ie. any field. But since the option to search the full-text is in addition to a default search in All Fields there is no way to limit your search just to the full-text.
  • For another strategy to find citations to a specific paper with co-authors , type
    someoneslastname in All fields
    AND
    someoneELSEslastname> in All fields
    also (alert: you may need to change the default OR to AND before your last term) coupled in All fields.
JSTOR
  • Type lastname in the search box (distinctive last name so I didn't bother with initials, etc.) and select to search it in full-text (not as author).
  • select disciplines/journals to search (required):
    for example, choose Business and Economics journals
  • x items matched the search. The results are presented 10 items at a time. Some of the matches are for articles with xxxxxx as author but some list papers written by others which cite xxxxxx. . .
  • When you look at the article *live* in JSTOR, each first page image will have hot links to each page where your name is mentioned, ie. in the text, as well as the bibliography. . .This is a nice feature. . .but doesn't remain visible when one downloads the articles. So you might want to look at the pages online.
  • Be aware, JSTOR has a "moving wall" so it typically doesn't have the last several years of most journals since that would put it in direct competition with some of the other database vendors (ranging, in most cases, from 2 to 5 years). Information at their website provides more explanation.
NetLibrary

Contains the contents of more than 15,000 scholarly books in electronic, searchable form. And the bibliographies are searchable!

  • Use Advanced Search screen.
  • To locate a name in the text or bibliography, type first and last name in quotations (to search it as a phrase)
    "ralph jones" in Full Text box.
    Or you can type only the last name if it is fairly unique, especially if the author typically uses initials instead of a first name. Or type lastname,initial.initial. with no spaces. Your strategy may be driven by the Style usually adopted by in-text citations and bibliography in your discipline. Some disciplines would not use ralph jones as a typical in-text style.
  • Type range of years in Publication Years box to focus the search on appropriate years, such as 1997-2001.
  • From your matches, Select a book. When its screen appears, select the option Browse this book online.
  • The term you matched will be itemized (numbered) on the left and the first occurrence will be highlighed in red in the right frame.
  • Click Go to view the next match if there is more than one and to determine if the person is the one you are searching. Continue clicking Next to arrive at the bibliography to see exactly what item is cited.
  • Click Back tab (in book page display, not browser toolbar) and then. . .
  • Click Return to Search Results mid-screen on right side to select another book from your results.

Social Sciences Databases

CINAHL (Nursing Literature Index)

Nursing journals often carry articles relating to social work and education along with ones on nursing so this resource is relevant to several disciplines.

  • On the Advanced Search screen, search someoneslastname in RT_References Text field.
  • In the resulting matches, you can scroll to the Bibliographic References and select your reference. Or, you can use the Ctrl-F or apple-F Find in Page feature, to jump through the text to your specific word (since this is not a fulltext database and the references appear immediately after the citation/abstract/etc. it may be just as easy to scroll and spot the name which will be BOLD).
Education Full Text

Provides access to full text (including bibliographies) of many articles in Education journals (same database without fulltext is named Education Index).

  • Use Advanced Search page.
  • Input someoneslastname and select Text in the dropdown box.
  • Click the html icon.
  • Click Ctrl-F or apple-F to bring up the search box. Enter someoneslastname and Click Find.
Ethnic NewsWatch

Contains the full-text of articles in important journals in multicultural studies. The EthnicNewswatch search engine provides an input box for Words in Articles which indexes the bibliographies that accompany the article text.

  • In the search box labeled Words in Articles, type someoneslastname. Note: do not type it in the Author/Byline box because that will point to the name in the author field only and not the full-text where the bibliographic citations are contained. Click Submit Search.
  • Click the first title in Summary of Search Results. When the full-text appears, click on the HITS option on the left side of the screen to highlight your search term in the full-text article in red. The HITS option is a streamlined version of the Find in Page function of your web browser; HITS is more efficient to use than Find in Page when it is available.
  • Use the Forward arrow on the top or bottom of the screen to move to the next record.
GenderWatch

Full-text of articles in important women's studies journals appear in GenderWatch . The GenderWatch search engine provides an input box for Words in Articles which indexes the bibliographies that accompany the article text.

  • In the search box labeled Words in Articles, type someone'slastname. Note: do not type it in the Author/Byline box because that will point to the name in the author field only and not the full-text where the bibliographic citations are contained. Click Submit Search.
  • Click the first title in Summary of Search Results. When the full-text appears, click on the HITS option on the left side of the screen to highlight your search term in the full-text article in red. The HITS option is a streamlined version of the Find in Page function of your web browser; HITS is more efficient to use than Find in Page when it is available.
  • Use the Forward arrow on the top or bottom of the screen to move to the next record.
PsycINFO
  • Click References tab to get a new search window.
  • Type someone'slastname someone'sfirstinitial in the box labeled Author on the References search screen. (Important : you will get "no matches" if you type in someone's firstname instead of someone'sfirstinitial.)
  • Click search.
  • Mark reference with matches (one at a time? see below)
  • Click Find Citing Articles button to match citer(s) with cited article.
  • If you are keeping track of what paper is cited by whom, I personally think it is easier to navigate the matches one at a time -- go from cited article to the one or more articles which cited it.
  • Another strategy is to check all of the references and then click Find Citing Articles. Then you'll have to click on All Citations and scan them to see which paper is cited in that source.

Sociological Collection (EBSCO)

  • On the Advanced Searchscreen, search someoneslastname and initials in TX All Text.
  • In results, click ctrl-F (Mac apple-F) for popup Find box, type in someoneslastname and click Find if an .html. If full-text is a .pdf, click binoculars icon for popup Find box.

Worldwide Political Science Abstracts (Cambridge)

  • On the Advanced Search screen, search someoneslastname and initials in References (RE=) field.
  • If that produces too many matches, you may search a few words from the paper's title, although make sure to change dropdown to References (RE=) field and *not* Title.
  • In your results, you may click View Record to see if the bibliography contains the author/publication you seek.
  • Remember to search for the First auhor of the paper.

Business Databases

Business Source Complete (EBSCO)

Contains the full-text of many articles on business subjects. This search technique will locate articles by someone'slastname cited in articles which have full-text.

  • Click References tab to get a new search window.
  • Type someone'slastname in the box.
  • Click search.
  • Mark reference with matches (One at a time? see below).
  • Click Find Citing Articles button to match citer(s) with cited article.
  • If you are keeping track of what paper is cited by whom, I personally think it is easier to navigate the matches one at a time -- go from cited article to the one or more articles which cited it.
  • Another strategy is to check all of the references and then click Find Citing Articles. Then you'll have to click on All Citations and scan them to see which paper is cited in that source.

Humanities Databases

Grove Music Online

Bibliographies accompany the authoritative articles on music and musicians.

  • Click Bibliographies.
  • Enter authorfirstname authorlastname in search box

International Index to Music Periodicals

Contains the full-text of many articles on music subjects. This search technique will locate articles by someone's firstname lastname cited in the full-text of the articles.

  • Click Search option.
  • Bullet Articles with full text under Search For...
  • In Keyword box, enter authorfirstname authorlastname or if the last name is distinctive you can enter only authorlastname
  • On the matches page, click the Page Image or full-text link and Find (ctrl-F or apple-F) the name in the text