Special Collections News

"A Rush to Judgment" Explores Overlooked Piece of the Warren Commission

Submitted by Jan Hebbard on Mon, 11/13/2017

When: 4:30-6:30pm, Thursday November 16th.

Where: Auditorium of the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries at the University of Georgia
 

What happens when the documents that preserve our collective history are lost or excluded from the official record? A panel discussion Nov. 16 takes up this question and more in the context of U.S. Sen. Richard B. Russell’s role on the Warren Commission which investigated the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

2017 Ga Writers Hall of Fame events announced

Submitted by cleveland on Thu, 10/19/2017

A scholar of southern culture and two poets will come together Nov.  5 to discuss their craft and more at the Author Discussion Series, a moderated panel discussion and  prelude to the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame induction ceremony Nov. 6.

Moderated by Hugh Ruppersburg, University Professor Emeritus, of the UGA English department, the discussion will take place at 5 p.m.  in the auditorium of the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries. A reception will follow.

The U.S. in the First World War: Richard Shawn Faulkner – “Mud, Blood, and Dysentery: The Doughboy’s Life in Battle”

Submitted by cleveland on Mon, 09/25/2017

Richard Shawn Faulkner will give a talk on “Mud, Blood, and Dysentery: The Doughboy’s Life in Battle” as part of The U.S. in the First World War, a lecture series commemorating the centennial of the entrance of the United States into World War I, sponsored by the department of history and the Willson Center and the UGA Libraries. Faulkner will speak at 7 p.m. Oct. 26 in the auditorium of the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries.

The U.S. in the First World War: Chad Williams – “World War I, Black Soldiers and the Birth of the New Negro”

Submitted by cleveland on Mon, 09/25/2017

Chad Williams will give a talk on the wartime experience of African American soldiers in World War I and the rise of the New Negro as part of The U.S. in the First World War, a lecture series commemorating the centennial of the entrance of the United States into World War I, sponsored by the department of history and the Willson Center and the UGA Libraries. He will speak Oct. 19 at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries.

Chad Williams is associate professor of African and Afro-American studies at Brandeis University. He is the author of Torchbearers of Democracy: African American Soldiers in the World War I Era and co-editor, with Kidada E. Williams and Keisha N. Blain, of Charleston Syllabus: Readings on Race, Racism, and Racial Violence, published in 2016 by the University of Georgia Press.

 

The U.S. in the First World War: Lynn Dumenil – “Modern American Women and World War I”

Submitted by cleveland on Mon, 09/25/2017

Lynn Dumenil will give a talk on “Modern American Women and World War I” as part of The U.S. in the First World War Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries. This is a lecture series commemorating the centennial of the entrance of the United States into World War I, sponsored by the department of history and the Willson Center and the UGA Libraries.

Odum School of Ecology presents “Darwin, Odum, and Ecological Challenges for the 21st Century” on Sept. 14

Submitted by cleveland on Wed, 09/06/2017

  The Odum School of Ecology kicks off a celebration of its tenth anniversary—and the fiftieth of its precursor, the Institute of Ecology—with a lecture, discussion and pair of exhibitions at the Richard B. Russell Special Collections Library on Sept. 14 at 4:30 p.m. Featured speakers include Betty Jean Craige, University Professor of Comparative Literature Emerita and Director Emerita of the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts; David C. Coleman, Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus of Ecology; and James W. Porter, Meigs Professor of Ecology Emeritus.

“Spirited: Prohibition in America" Opens at Richard B. Russell Library

Submitted by cleveland on Fri, 08/18/2017

During the era of Prohibition Americans could no longer manufacture, sell, or transport intoxicating beverages. Spirited: Prohibition in America, a new exhibition opening Sept. 1 at the UGA Special Collections Libraries explores this tumultuous time in American history, when flappers and suffragists, bootleggers and temperance lobbyists, and legends, such as Al Capone and Carrie Nation, took sides in this battle against the bottle.

 

Visitors will learn about the complex issues that led America to adopt Prohibition through the 18th Amendment to the Constitution in 1919 until its repeal through the 21st Amendment in 1933. The amendment process, the changing role of liquor in American culture, Prohibition’s impact on the roaring ‘20s, and the role of women, and how current liquor laws vary from state to state are among the topics addressed.

 

Covered With Glory: Football at UGA, 1892-1917

Submitted by cleveland on Wed, 08/16/2017

 The formative years of UGA’s football program is the focus of a new exhibit, “Covered With Glory: Football at UGA, 1892-1917” this fall at the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

Rarely seen artifacts and photographs from UGA’s earliest gridiron heroes are featured. Visitors will learn about: coaching legend Glenn ‘Pop’ Warner, the first UGA football coach to coach for more than one year; ‘War Eagle’ Ketron, who overcame parental objections to become one of Georgia’s greatest players of the 1900s; and Herty Field, the campus site of so many early battles.  The tragic story of Von Gammon, a UGA football player whose death during a game against the University of Virginia in 1897 nearly ended the UGA football program, is highlighted.

Papers of ‘extraordinary’ educator, peanut champion given to UGA Hargrett Library

Submitted by cleveland on Mon, 07/24/2017

An extraordinary educator who took over operations of the family farm after his father 's death, Andrew Avery helped create the Decatur County Peanutorama, highlighting the crop and the surrounding county's contribution to its marketing.

Avery’s family has donated his papers to the University of Georgia Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, including correspondence, photographs, printed material, notes, legal documents, plats, and various ephemera.  Of note is the scrapbook documenting farm improvements he made for the Atlanta Constitution's Plant-to-Prosper contest of 1938, which he won, as well as many photographs of schools he was involved with in southwest Georgia.