Transcribe-a-thon: Freedmen's Bureau Papers

Submitted by amywatts on Tue, 02/13/2018

The UGA Libraries are holding a Transcribe-a-thon in honor of Frederick Douglass's 200th birthday on Wednesday, February 14, from 12pm -3pm in the Main Library Instruction Lab.

We will be joining the Colored Conventions Project and the Smithsonian Institution and over forty other institutions to help transcribe the Freedmen's Bureau papers. No experience necessary. Stop in as long as you can, but expect to be there at least 20-30 minutes. 

"White Ribbon Army: Women’s Crusade Against the Saloon"

Submitted by cleveland on Mon, 01/29/2018

“White Ribbon Army: Women’s Crusade Against the Saloon” takes a look at the Temperance Movement of the 19th century.

The exhibit, in the galleries of the Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library through May, draws material from several collections and is sponsored by the Lucy Hargrett Draper Center & Archives for the Study of the Rights of Women in History & Law (circa 1550-1920).

As the United States became urbanized and industrialized, many became concerned with social issues such as poverty and the perception of declining morals. A series of social and religious reforms, including the Temperance Movement, swept the country.

Augusta Library’s African American Funeral Programs Collection Expanded

Submitted by amywatts on Fri, 01/26/2018

Georgia HomePLACE, the Digital Library of Georgia (DLG), and the Augusta-Richmond County Public Library System are pleased to announce the addition of over 10,000 digitized pages of African American funeral programs to the Augusta Public Library’s Eula M. Ramsey Johnson Memorial Funeral Program Collection.  Spanning 1933-2017 and consisting of over 3,000 programs, the digital collection provides both a rich source of genealogical information and local history about the African American community. Programs are freely available online through the DLGFuneral program

Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color

Submitted by cleveland on Fri, 01/26/2018

The 2018 UGA Women's History Month keynote address will be presented by Andrea J. Ritchie. Her talk is co-sponsored by the Lucy Hargrett Draper Center and Archives for the Study of the Rights of Women in History and Law.

Andrea Ritchie is a black lesbian immigrant and police misconduct attorney and organizer who has engaged in extensive research, writing, and advocacy around criminalization of women and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people of color over the past two decades. She recently published Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color now available from Beacon Press.

Ritchie is a nationally recognized expert and sought after commentator on policing issues. 

She will speak March 1 beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Russell Special Collections Libraries. It is open free to the public.

 

Open Doors: 100 years of FACS

Submitted by cleveland on Wed, 01/24/2018

“Open Doors: 100 Years of Family and Consumer Sciences at UGA” an exhibit on the college’s centennial, also focuses on the admission of women to public higher education, UGA’s role as a land-grant institution, and how the field has grown and adapted over the decades.

The exhibit, at the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries, will be on display through June and includes publications, manuscripts, period clothing from the Historic Clothing and Textile Collection, and photographs of the first women admitted to UGA, food preservation classes, needlework demonstrations, WWII military on the UGA campus and other moments from the past 100 years.