Special Collections News

Georgia's Music Business: Past, Present, Future

Submitted by cleveland on Fri, 03/16/2018

Rodney Mills and Michele Caplinger share observations of the changing face of the Georgia Music scene with the director of the UGA Music Business Program, David Barbe.

The April 12 program will begin at 4 p.m. in the auditorium of the Russell Special Collections Libraries, followed by a small reception with a display of artifacts from the Georgia Music Hall of Fame collection.

Mills served as chief engineer at Lefevre Sound Studios, engineered and produced at Atlanta’s Studio One before forming his own recording company. He has earned over 50 gold and platinum records for engineering, producing, and mastering and was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame in 1996.

Campus and Community Partners Host 4th Annual School Lunch Competition

Submitted by Jan Hebbard on Mon, 02/19/2018

Local chefs will once again take on the School Lunch Challenge March 24, creating tasty dishes that meet USDA School Lunch Challenge Logorequirements for the National School Lunch Program. Attendees will have a chance to sample the creations at the cooking competition from 12-1:30 p.m. in the cafeteria of Whitehead Road Elementary School.  

Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color

Submitted by cleveland on Fri, 01/26/2018

The 2018 UGA Women's History Month keynote address will be presented by Andrea J. Ritchie. Her talk is co-sponsored by the Lucy Hargrett Draper Center and Archives for the Study of the Rights of Women in History and Law.

Andrea Ritchie is a black lesbian immigrant and police misconduct attorney and organizer who has engaged in extensive research, writing, and advocacy around criminalization of women and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people of color over the past two decades. She recently published Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color now available from Beacon Press.

Ritchie is a nationally recognized expert and sought after commentator on policing issues. 

She will speak March 1 beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Russell Special Collections Libraries. It is open free to the public.


Open Doors: 100 years of FACS

Submitted by cleveland on Wed, 01/24/2018

“Open Doors: 100 Years of Family and Consumer Sciences at UGA” an exhibit on the college’s centennial, also focuses on the admission of women to public higher education, UGA’s role as a land-grant institution, and how the field has grown and adapted over the decades.

The exhibit, at the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries, will be on display through June and includes publications, manuscripts, period clothing from the Historic Clothing and Textile Collection, and photographs of the first women admitted to UGA, food preservation classes, needlework demonstrations, WWII military on the UGA campus and other moments from the past 100 years.

2018 class of the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame announced

Submitted by cleveland on Thu, 01/11/2018

 Five authors comprise the 2018 class of Georgia Writers Hall of Fame inductees:  Michael Bishop, Tayari Jones and Cynthia Shearer will be admitted at the November ceremony; Furman Bisher and Frances Newman will be honored posthumously.

The University of Georgia Libraries began in 2000 the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame to honor Georgia writers and to introduce the public to the library’s rich collections for research into Georgia literature and cultural history.The ceremony will be held in November, part of the UGA Spotlight on the Arts festival. 

Vintage Microphone Collection Now an Online Exhibit

Submitted by amywatts on Mon, 01/08/2018

Photo of a Western Electric microphoneThe James U. Steele Vintage Broadcast Microphone Collection is one of the most comprehensive collections of American made microphones from the first half of the 20th century and it's now available to view online

Since the birth of broadcast radio in 1906, the microphone has been the centerpiece of emerging technologies that allowed the human voice to be heard live by vast audiences. Many microphones became icons of the radio and television industry, including the RCA 44 and 77 series microphones which seemed ubiquitous in the early television era, and the Shure 55 series, dubbed “The Elvis Microphone” for its frequent appearance on stage with Elvis Presley.