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Minutes of the University of Georgia Board of Trustees,
1878-1882

 

 

The Minutes of the Trustees of the University of Georgia

 

 

Beginning August 2nd, 1878

 

Wm. L. Mitchell.

 

Secretary.


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University of Georgia

Athens, August 2nd, 1878

            The Trustees of the University of Georgia met in stated annual session in the College Library at 10 o’clock A.M. and were called to order by the Senior Trustee present in the absence of the President and vice-President.

The meeting was opened with prayer by the Chancellor Rev. H. H. Tucker, D.D.LL.D.

Upon calling the roll the following members answered to their names; viz:

Messrs. Mitchell           Miller,              Lewis,

              Hill,                Brown,             Toombs,

              Yancey,          Jackson,           Pierce,

              Crawford,      Billups,             Hall,

              Barrow,          Thomas,           Cobb,

              Harris,            MacIntyre,       Stephens,

              Sheer.

And during the session the following members appeared and took their seats, viz:

Messrs. Vason, Beckwith, Lawton, and Colquitt.

            The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

Dr. Miller took the chair and called upon the Chancellor for the annual communication, which he read as follows:

                                    To the Honorable

The Board of Trustees of the

                                    University of Georgia.

Gentlemen - The celebrated John Randolph, having once previously offended his constituents by some of his votes and speeches in Congress, was informed by friends that the excitement against him was so intense, that he would incur the risk of personal violence if he appeared among the people of his district.  Notwithstanding this, he made an appointment to address his fellow-citizens, at a given time and place.  A seething multitude of enraged people assembled, no to hear him but

 

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Chancellor’s Report

to crush him.  Suddenly he appeared before them, and by a strange magnetism awed them into silence, and began his address by saying:  “When I was a little boy, my mother taught me this:  ‘that the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.’  And it is my conviction, after many long years of observation, that the fear of man is the height of folly.”  The sequel of the story need not be told, for the wisdom that his mother taught him, and the experience which his knowledge of the world gave him, and the honesty & courage of his manly heart, made him invincible.  I’ll not know that there is anything in the present circumstances parallel to those just related of the statesman of Roanoke, further than this:  that grave and important statements are to be made, which ought to be made in the fear of God, and not in the fear of man.  That which I feel it my duty to say, I shall say, gentlemen, in a spirit regardless of consequences, but, at the same time, with due respect for those who may differ with me in opinion, or who may question the correctness of my statements.

The number of students in the various Departments has been as follows:

Franklin College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 70

State College of Agriculture, etc. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  40

Law Department _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  6

Total in Athens _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 116

At Dahlonega _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 304

In Medical Department _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _50

Total Number in all Departments _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _470

                        There has been a steady decline in most of the Departments for several years past, and it is worthy of remark that every year the character of the decline is the same; that is, the heaviest falling off is in the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, and the lightest has been in Franklin College.  The reason of this I stated last year, and will now only repeat that the public had formed expectations of the State College which could not possibly be realized.

 

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August 1878

Supposing at first, that an almost illiterate boy could be transformed in a few months by means of what is called practical education into a scientific agriculturist or engineer, the people sent in their patronage to this College like a flood.  Discovering their mistake, and that a student of very low grade of culture could learn no more here than he could at a common academy, at one-fourth the expense, a strong reaction took place in the public mind, and the people not only discontinued their patronage, but were led to underestimate the real merits of the institution.  First, they expected too much; now they give credit for too little.  It will probably take several years for the public mind to adjust itself to the facts; which are, that valuable and thorough instruction may be, and is, given in this Department; and that, on the other hand, no short-hand method has been discovered by which a lad wholly untaught can be manipulated into an educated and scientific man in the course of two or three years.  I repeat the very words of my last report, when I say, that a certain amount of general culture is necessary to fit a man for anything.  Special education can be begun only when a reasonable amount of general education has been completed.  When people learn this; when they learn that a youth must be at least fairly if not thoroughly trained in such preliminary education as can be obtained at a good academy, before he is qualified to pursue to advantage the higher studies of this College; and that even then, at least three years more will be required to complete a fair scientific education; and that after all this, several years of schooling in the great world itself will be necessary to teach the student practical wisdom, and how successfully to apply his theories; I say, when the people learn all this, they will be prepared to appreciate that most excellent department of the University known as the State

 

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Chancellor’s Report

College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts.  Until then the people are doomed to disappointment; and until then the Department will probably continue to decline in public favor.  Even what I have now said will, perhaps, make the Department more unpopular for a time than ever. But occupying the position that I do, at the head of the highest institution of learning in the State, I feel it my duty to teach the public no less than the students; and to lay a broad and solid foundation in sound truth, on which this valuable Department may grow up to usefulness and glory.  Its early and temporary prosperity was based on false grounds; of course such a superstructure, built on utter misconception, must fall to ruin.  Let the people learn the real merit, and the real purpose and scope of this Department, and send their sons to it properly prepared to profit by its extraordinary and most splendid advantages; & let them cease to expect the semi-miraculous results heretofore vainly hoped for; and let them learn to realize that thorough-breds can be had only by thorough training; and the result will be that this identical institution, which is now the subject of so much cavil and complaint will be, as by right it should be now, the pride and boast of every intelligent citizen of Georgia.

                        Corroborative of the truth of my remarks is the fact that the largest patronage the State College ever had was in the second year of its existence.  In the third year, which was before the present administration was inaugurated, and while the institution was in first hands, the decline began; just as I think it ought to have done.  I risk nothing in saying that the great majority of the students in attendance at that time made a mistake in coming here, and would have done better if they had remained at home, and would have done better if they had remained at home, and attended the ordinary schools in their respective neighborhoods.  While here, they were instructed mostly by Tutors in the merest rudiments of education; and they could have received such instruction just as well, or better, at home.  In two short years the good sense of the people discovered the

 

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August 1878

Mistake, and they wisely withdrew their patronage.  Perhaps, if suitable steps were taken, this patronage might be regained; but having seen one bubble burst, I am by no means inclined to blow up another.  The State College is really a magnificent institution; its officers are accomplished and it appliances superb; but it is wholly unadapted to the wants of ordinary school-boys; and if its patronage can be increased only by enticing lads of this class to attend.  I shall hope that there will be no increase.  The truth is, there is very little demand in Georgia for thorough scientific education; and while the institution retains its present and proper character, its legitimate patronage must necessarily be small.  Its past popularity was largely fictitious; the delusion has vanished; and we may rejoice that we are coming now to a foundation of solid facts.

Franklin College has suffered a much smaller decline. It is an old institution; its character is known and understood; and as no new and wild expectations have been raised, none have been disappointed.  As to the general decline in the number of students in all Departments, I can only repeat the same old story, but none the less true for being old.  Continued and increasing financial depression affects all the higher and more expensive institutions of learning.

The Controller Generals’ report for 1877 shows a decline of more than ten millions of dollars in the value of taxable property in the State of Georgia since the report of 1876; and, taking into account the fact that certain articles are taxed in 1877 which were not taxed in 1876; the decline in value for one year is more than eleven millions of dollars.  Nor is the enormous loss in one year distributed evenly among the people; it falls chiefly on the very class whose patronage we might expect.  Nor have we seen the worst. The financial failures in the State of Georgia, for the first six months of 1878, are larger by far than during the same

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chancellor’s Report

period in 1877.

To ignore such palpable and far-reaching facts as those just stated in accounting for our diminished numbers, would show a strange degree of unfairness or thoughtlessness.  I take it for granted that the mere mention of these facts will suffice to give them due weight.

Still, it may be replied that other institutions have not suffered in like manner.  A careful examination of the facts will show, I think, that this is a mistake.  There has been a general decline in the patronage of the higher institutions of learning; we are simply sharing the common misfortune.  True, there are some apparently exceptional cases, and these can be easily accounted for.  Our own Department at Dahlonega may be cited as an example. Its patronage has been largely increased. Does any one suppose that that Department is held by the public to be superior to the Departments at Athens?  Or that it is equal to them? Or that it is in reach or in sight of them?  By no means; it is cheaper - a fact in which there is immense attraction; and it is well known that in elementary branches, and also in some that are higher, a student can be satisfactorily taught.  Many persons in their poverty have abandoned the idea of giving their sons such superior advantages as can be had at Athens, and send them to a cheaper place, where after all, they can learn as much as they have time and ability to learn.  A large number of students there, are of such a class, that if we had them here, we should be obliged to organize them into grammar school classes, just as was done here in the second year of the life of the State College, which is the only year in which (in the sense of large numbers) it ever prospered.  The tide has simply turned, and the flood that came here during that single year now flows appropriately to Dahlonega.

Emory College, in a neighboring county, is another exception.  But the distinguished and gifted gentleman who presides over that institution has made much personal effort to obtain students; effort of a kind which

 

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August 1878

would not be expected of any officer here.

Denominational colleges have an advantage over us in this respect; what would be proper and successful with them, would be neither proper nor successful with us.  By such means as this, perfectly legitimate under the circumstances, but from which our conditions debar us, Emory college has been sustained.

Mercer University has had an agent in the field, scouring the State in all directions, and making personal appeals at innumerable firesides; but, notwithstanding this, and notwithstanding its handsome endowment and its huge constituency, the number of students has declined from 150 in 1874-5 to 108 in 1877-8; and that, too, although it has a city of perhaps three times the size of Athens from which to draw local patronage.

The University of Virginia, greatly renowned, reports 363, which is a great falling off from its former years; but examination of the catalogue shows that the number of what we should call college students is about 115 or 120, a number nearly the same as ours.  Yet that University is held up as a great success and ours as a great failure!  Washington and Lee University reports 116, and Davidson College, N.C., with its handsome endowment, reports 81!  The University of Mississippi reports an attendance of 471, which looks large indeed beside our meagre (sic) report of 116.  But the catalogue of that institution shows that 260 of the 471 are attendants at a grammar school; and when these, and a number of irregulars and 35 law students are deducted, the startlingly large number of 471 dwindles down to 143!  With equal propriety may we include as part of our attendance the students at Dahlonega and Augusta; and if so, we can show an attendance of exactly 470, which comes within one of the great number in Mississippi.

 

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Chancellor’s Report

The vast number of students said to be at Vanderbilt University has excited the astonishment of many.  The number reported is 405, and it is the fact that four hundred and five names are actually printed in alphabetical order in the catalogue!  The same document shows, however, that one hundred and ninety-two of the 405 are in the “Medical Department,” which is nothing more than the Medical College at Nashville, which was an old, well established institution many years before the corner-stone of Vanderbilt was laid.  Thirty-one of the 405 are members of the “Law Department,” and this too, like the Medical Department, existed long before the University was thought of, and both are mere attaches (sic) of the University, or rather the University is an attache (sic) to them, for they have the prestige of seniority and of independent existence. Fifty-three more of the 405 are in the “Theological Department”; ministers of the gospel, and really not college students at all; when all these spurious figures are deducted, the collapse that takes place reduces the huge number of 405 down to the not very astonishing figure of one hundred and twenty-nine! So, when the touchstone of analysis is applied, we see that Vanderbilt, with all the charm of novelty, and with all its millions, and with all its really magnificent appointments, far surpassing anything at the South, and with all its other varied attractions, shows a number of students very little larger than ours, which is so much ridiculed!

An examination of the catalogues of many of the institutions said to be marvelously prosperous would show, I think, that the case last under consideration is a specimen case; and that when the bottom facts are reached, there is not so much difference between their success and ours as people, catching up idle rumors, have been led to suppose.

Considering certain difficulties with which we have had to struggle, the only surprise is that we have done so well. The frightful evil which I mentioned last

 

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August 1878

year, namely, that the institution seems to be in a state of continuous real or threatened revolution, still exists.  I do not know that I can excuse myself any better now than in my Report of last year, and, therefore, quote from that document the following language:

“The great decline in the number of students is not owing wholly to financial causes.  It arises partly from the fact that public confidence in the institution is shaken by the perpetual changes made in its management.  This begets a feeling of unrest, disquiet and suspicion.  Where everything is unstable it is natural to suppose that something is wrong, and radically wrong.  A line of policy is no sooner adopted than it is set aside, and another is put in its place.  There is too much legislation.  In innumerable instances it matters but little what the law is, so it is only permanent.  If wholesome regulations were adopted, once for all, or at least for a decade, and if these were left untouched, things would soon adjust themselves to each other, and confidence would be restored.

“It is believed, too, that the Faculty are mere tenants at will, - liable to be displaced at any moment, either with cause or without; and every year speculation is rife as to who will compose the Faculty for the succeeding year.  The friends of certain parties hope to find places for them in the Faculty by displacing others, and this makes every officer a target for the shafts of the envious; many things are said, the object of which is merely to empty a chair that it may be filled by another, but the effect of which is to damage the whole institution.  If this out-cry is ignored, then the public are led to believe that the institution is not properly officered; if it is listened to, then a role of never-ending change is inaugurated, and the management of the institution

 

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Chancellor’s Report

passes from the hands of the Trustees to those of anonymous, and, of course, irresponsible writers in the newspapers.  While an officer is here, a cry is made by interested outsiders to have him dismissed; when he is dismissed or made so uncomfortable that he resigns, a cry is made by his friends to have him back.  Thus it is that the officers are more like the lodgers at a hotel, then like citizens with a domicil(sic).

“The people seeing this uncertainty in the tenure of office, suppose it to arise from a want of confidence in the officers, and, consequently, they too lose confidence, & are unwilling to patronize the institution.  The only remedy for this, is for the Board to see that the chairs are filled by suitable men, and to let the public understand that no changes will be made.  Indeed as a choice of evils it would be better to retain a small proportion of incompetent officers, rather than that the whole institution should be racked by perpetual earthquakes.  But this is not necessary.  The Board can always judge of an officer by his work.  If he does it well he should be retained at all hazards, and in spite of any clamor that may be raised against him. If he shows himself to be incapable, or negligent, or unadapted to his position, he should be promptly displaced, without regard to the displeasure which such action might give to his friends, and however numerous his friends might be.  The public should learn that the decisions of this Board are unaffected by outside influences, and that they are supreme and final.”  It may be a mere repetition, in substance, of what has been said in this extract, but I cannot refrain from saying further, that the position in which the officers are supposed to be placed inviting attack, and encouraging war upon them, the result has been that ceaseless war has been waged; the war has always been merciless, frequently scandalous, and sometimes unscrupulous.  An officer could so far unbend his dignity as to reply to scurrilous attacks, nor to

 

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August 1878.

attacks of any kind; and hence column after column of this kind of literature has been launched upon the public, and people have imagined because it was not answered and contradicted, that it could not be.  This has been kept up for four years.  Is it any wonder that the institution has suffered.  The wonder is that it has been able to stand at all!  Such perpetual dropping would wear away a rock.  Yet the very men who have so industriously kept up this ceaseless cavil are left to be frequently making the anxious inquiry, “What can be the matter with the State University?”  And our very best friends, by frequently making the same inquiry, and by injudicious defense, though with good intentions, sometimes do us great damage, so that we often exclaim, “Save us from our friends!”  And many times have we thought that if all the world, including alike friends and foes, would only bless us with the charity of silence, and let us alone, we should ask no more.

It is an evidence of the intrinsic merit of the University, and of its wonderful resistive however, that it has been able to withstand the combined effect of convulsions within and ceaseless attack from without.  Its friends and enemies seem to have combined to open upon it a destroying fire in front and in rear, and yet it still lives; and has power and vitality enough, if it were only let alone for a season, to recuperate entirely and recover all its former prestige.

If your honorable body will put the faculty on a solid foundation, and take some pains to make the public understand that you have confidence in them, and that you intend to retain them, and protect them, and sustain them, I have not the shadow of a doubt that

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

the number of students would be speedily increased.  If you cannot conscientiously give such support to the present Faculty, then I earnestly recommend that you remove all of them, including myself, or so many of them as may be necessary, and fill their places with more suitable men.

                        A great misfortune that besets the Faculty is, that they have not sufficient control over the domestic affairs of the institution.  I give the same illustration of this that I have been in the habit of giving.  Over and over for years past, the request has been made that the giving of medals in and by the Societies be prohibited.  Untold disorders spring from this insignificant source, absolutely uncompensated for, by any good result whatever.  The Faculty are, and always have been, unanimous in their disapprobation of it.  Yet it has been continued, and the Faculty have been held responsible for the demoralization that it produced.  I am happy to say that this evil has worked its own cure.  Its consequences became so damaging that the students themselves abolished it of their own accord.  But they have the right to restore it, and when its evils have been forgotten, they may do so.  I do not ask that any action in this particular case be taken; but I do ask that all laws and parts of laws which deny to the Faculty the complete control of the everyday life of the institution be repealed.

I am also of the opinion that the presiding officer of the Faculty ought to be a member of the Board of Trustees, or, at least, that he should be allowed to occupy a seat with them and participate in their deliberations.  The Faculty who know, or who ought to know, more about the institution than all the rest of the world together, are absolutely excluded from it councils; and the Trustees, who are with us only three or four days in the year, and that, too, not when the institution is in working order, but on a holiday occasion, legislate on subjects concerning which

 

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August 1878.

They have little or no information.  It is not surprising that much of this legislation should be exceedingly embarrassing to the Faculty, and injurious to the best interests of the institution.  It would be a miracle if it were not so.  True, the Chancellor is permitted to make an annual report, but experience has shown that many of his suggestions are either overlooked or misunderstood, or, without careful inquiry as to their value, set aside.  The Faculty need a living advocate to be present with this body, to explain and urge their views.  My distinguished predecessor, Dr. Church, was a member of this body, and the president of it.  At that time the Trustees and the Faculty were happily “en rapport.”  Such, I think, has never been the case since that day; and the institution can never be in healthy condition until these two bodies are in such relation to each other that they can act in concert.

In my report of last year, I expressed my disapprobation of what is known with us as the “University System,” and called attention to some of the many evils with which the introduction of that system, some years ago, has afflicted us.  I also recommended a return to the old and well known system called sometimes the “Curriculum system,” and sometimes the “College system.”  I suggested, at the same time, that three parallel curricula might be established in such a way as to satisfy the demands of those who desired varied education, and yet avoiding the difficulties and confusion into which the “University system,” so called, had plunged us.  To my great gratification, your honorable body appointed a committee to take the matter into consideration, instructing said committee to confer with the Faculty on the subject.  At the request of the chairman of that committee, the Faculty presented to him a statement of their views, which may be found in the printed document herewith

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

submitted.  An examination of that paper will show that there are two reports, one from all the Faculty except myself, the other from myself alone.

On one print there is quite a divergence of views, but on the essential point there is no difference of opinion whatever.  The evils complained of by me are admitted; the remedies suggested by me are accepted.  It is agreed by all, that we should have a system of close curricula, exactly such as you, gentlemen of the Board, were accustomed to in your own college days.  All the new-fangled notions, which have been our scourge for the last seven years, are expurgated.  True, we shall have six courses of study instead of one, and the student can select which he will of the six, but, having done this, he has no further option.  It is as if six trains of cars were drawn up at a depot, the traveler buys his ticket and selects his train.  After that he is in the hands of the conductor.  In the working of this plan, after it gets fairly on foot, I think there will be no difficulty, and I think it will remedy all, or nearly all, the evils complained of in my last report.  The plan proposed by the Faculty is precisely the plan proposed by me in that report, except that six curricula are prescribed instead of three.  I question the wisdom of this, and, if I had been supreme and alone in the premises, I should have limited the number to three, but in deference to my honored colleagues I yield this point, and accept the six curricula.  It is, after all, a matter of minor importance.  The real point, in fact, the only point in issue is, whether we shall, or shall not have a system of fixed curricula.  On this point the Faculty and myself are a unit.  When this is said, substantially all is said.  The difference between the plan on which we have been working, and that which we now propose, is in substance about this: that in the former case the Faculty adjusted themselves to the wishes of the students; now the students

 

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August 1878.

must adjust themselves to the wishes of the Faculty.  The institution passing over from the control of boys to that of men, must, I think, by greatly benefitte(sic).

                        The resolution of your honorable body under which this action of the Faculty was taken, is as follows:

                        “Resolved, - That the subject of a return to the curriculum system and the abandonment in whole or in part of what is known as the University system, shall be referred to a select committee of five, to report thereon at the next annual meeting, consulting the Faculty as to said report.”  With the text of the this resolution before me, I have taken the affirmative, and have argued in favor of a return to the curriculum system, and of the abandonment of what is known as the University system.  My esteemed colleagues, it appears to me, have lost sight of the text, and have argued to show that the curriculum system and what is known as the University system, are substantially the same thing; or, at least, that the former can be so administered as to make it identical with the latter, and they urge that it be so administered.  That is, (according to my view) they retain the name while they change the thing.  Here is where I differ with them; I would change both the name and the thing. If it be possible to get rid of the name I think it would be wise to do so, for the name is associated with nothing but confusion and disorder.  If the name be retained, the suspicion will still linger in the minds of the people that the chaos which that name once described still remains, and the sooner it is understood that the reign of confusion has ceased, the better it will be for us.  It is unfortunate indeed, that changes in the University should be so frequent, but in my opinion, nothing would be more

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

popular just now, than a new departure; and the more complete our departure is, in name as well as in fact, from the quagmire in which we have been floundering for the last seven years, the more popular it will be.  This whole subject, however, is discussed in the printed document above referred to, where both sides are fairly represented; and to that document I most earnestly ask your careful attention.  Both parties are willing to rest the case on the argument there set forth.  But whatever may be the decision of the minor issue there discussed, I shall always feel that the most valuable and important act of my whole professional life, was that in which I called attention to the evils of our so-called University system, and inaugurated the present movement, which, whatever may be my destiny, I know must result in benefit of incalculable value to the University of Georgia.  To have been its chief officer is comparatively a small matter, for that position may have been occupied unworthily(sic); but to have been its benefactor, whether so recognized or not, is matter of thankfulness and joy.

At the last meeting of this Board, the following resolution was passed:

                        “Resolved, that upon the certificate of the President of the North Georgia Agricultural College that a young man there graduating has undergone a satisfactory examination in all the studies required by the University of Georgia for a Bachelor’s degree in any named department, such graduate shall be entitled to receive such degree from the University.”

                        In consequence of this resolution a certain correspondence took place between President Lewis and myself, which best explains itself, and which is herewith submitted.  The meaning of the resolution, as I interpret it, is that the certificate of the President of the North Georgia Agricultural College must show that students who have actually graduated at Dahlonega, have made attainments exactly the same

 

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August 1878.

in variety and in degree as those who graduate at Athens.  Under present conditions this is manifestly impossible; and, consequently, when I was applied to by President Lewis to confer the degree of Bachelor of Arts on some eight or ten young gentlemen who had pursued their studies at Dahlonega, I declined doing so.  The Board of Trustees, however, of the Department at Dahlonega, in the exercise of a right conferred on them by law, did confer the degree of Bachelor of Arts on these young gentlemen; and called on me, as the presiding officer over the University in all its Departments, to sign the diplomas awarded, and to deliver them.  Having advised with the Professor of Law, I decided that it was my duty to comply with this request; and I, accordingly, in my official capacity, did sign the diplomas, and did deliver them.  But the diploma was not the diploma of the University of Georgia; it was the diploma of the North Georgia Agricultural College, and I did not act in the premises under the resolution above quoted.  I would have taken the same action if that resolution had never been passed, which, as matters now stand, is likely to remain a dead letter for some years.

I beg to call your special attention to that resolution, and to the misunderstanding which arose from it; and I would respectfully suggest that it would be well either to repeal it, or to pass another explaining or modifying it, so as to prevent the occurrence of trouble in future.  I think that if the interpretation put in it by me were declared to be the true meaning the result would be all that could be desired.  It would be well, however, to specify that in ascertaining that attainments of the students at Dahlonega the same examination papers must be used which are used in Athens.

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

It appears to me that the expenses of the University, in many particulars, might be greatly reduced, & that the money thus saved might be judiciously applied in other directions.  For example, there are five officers, to wit:  the Chancellor, the Professor of Ethics, the Professor of Belles Lettres, the Professor of History and the Professor of English Literature, whose duties could be discharged by three men, or, if a fourth were needed, the place could be filled by a tutor at a very small salary.  Three would probably suffice, and the salaries of the other two might be saved.

                        The President of the State College has an extra compensation of two hundred and fifty dollars.  This expenditure is wholly unnecessary.  One presiding officer is far better than two, however excellent the two may be.  If the law requires that the State college shall have a President as a district officer, let the Chancellor be elected to that office, without extra pay, and thus save the two hundred and fifty dollars.  It is proper for me to say, that the relations between President Charbonnier and myself are, and always have been, and I doubt not always will be, of the most agreeable character.  I have never seen a man in my life with whom I could work more harmoniously; and if the State College must have a President other than the Chancellor, and if I had the power to select one, Col. Charbonnier would be my first choice.  But it is needless to waste two hundred and fifty dollars; and this is worse than wasted, for the reason that one chief officer is better than two.

                        The office of Inspector of Public Buildings is also a needless one.  The duties attached to that position might and ought to be discharged by the Chancellor, and that without extra pay; and thus two hundred and fifty dollars more might be saved.

The Overseer of the Agricultural Farm is paid a salary of one thousand dollars, besides which he has his house rent free.  It is no part of his duty to instruct students, nor has he ever instructed one.  His only duty

 

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August 1878.

is to oversee a farm, so called, of thirty acres, half of which, or more, is under cultivation.  It does appear to me that one thousand dollars and house-rent is an enormous price to pay for a mere overseer of a thirty acre farm.

An inspection of the Treasurer’s books will show that more than eighteen hundred dollars has been expended on this farm during the present year, in addition to the salary above spoken of.  True, a part of this was for a new roof on the building, and a part was for an extra amount of fencing; the rest was for current expenses.  Taken altogether, the outlay has been enormous, and if any benefit whatever has accrued therefrom to any of the students, I am not aware of it.

                        Besides all this, the Professor of Agriculture receives a salary of two thousand dollars, and while it is true that he has taught geology and natural history, yet, as a matter of fact, no student has studied Agriculture this year.  As to the management of the farm, I am not a competent judge; but I am informed that land ought to be broken up in the autumn, or, if not, then in January or February or March.  If I am correctly informed, no plough was put into the ground on the University farm untill(sic) about the middle of April.  The cotton, I suppose, ought all to have been planted by that time, and the corn long before.  The growing crop is said, by judges of such things, to be very poor, perhaps the poorest in the neighborhood; and this, I suppose is just what might have been expected.

My opinion is worth very little on agricultural matters; but the glaring facts which I have stated, & the immense expenditure which has been made, are enough to attract the attention of any one, and I have felt that I would not be discharging my duty as presiding officer of the University without bringing them to your notice.  Possibly, I may have misstated the facts; I hope it may be so, though I have not done it

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

intentionally.  Possibly, I may have done injustice to some; if so, I shall be in haste to repair the injury as soon as possible; but I must express my conviction that many hundreds, if not several thousands of dollars have been wasted during the past year on the Agricultural Department; and my further conviction, that not one iota of benefit has been received from it by anybody.

I trust that the whole subject will be carefully investigated, and if I am found to be in error, I shall promptly acknowledge it, and make my humbles apologies.  If the evils I have complained of be real, I doubt not that they will be speedily remedied.

The duties of the Professor of Greek have been admirably discharged by that most excellent and faithful officer, Professor Waddell.  But I feel bound to say that the University of Georgia is probably the only institution of equal pretentions(sic) in the United States, or in the world, which has only one Professorship of Ancient Languages.  I earnestly recommend the re-establishment of the chair, and the election of a suitable person to fill it.  The increased expense need be no objection, for some of the thousands expended in other directions might, in my opinion, be better appropriated in this way.

The chair of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy is also vacant.  Professors Charbonnier, White and Little, have discharged the duties of this chair, and deserve thanks for their able and efficient services.  But that this temporary arrangement should be made permanent, is a thing not to be thought of.

In this connection it is proper to say, that I believe the Professorship or Engineering is unnecessary for the present, as a distinct chair, and, as such, might be dispensed with.  It might be combined with the Professorship of Natural Philosophy, provided that an adjunct Professor were appointed to assist in the two departments.  This adjunct Professor might be had for a thousand dollars, and thus half of a Professor’s salary might be saved, and the duties of the two Departments would be just as well discharged.  I do not

 

(21)

August 1878.

say this arrangement would always be wise, but only that it is so under the present circumstances.  If the Board will appoint a committee to consult with the Professor of Engineering, I think it will be found that his views coincide with mine.

I do not see why, with a good economy, a suitable corps of instructors cannot be sustained by the present income of the University, exclusive of tuition fees.  I, therefore, repeat the recommendation of last year, that free tuition be given to all; requiring, however, an annual payment of ten dollars, half of which for the increase of the library, and the other half for the repair of the buildings.

Much has recently been said about the desirableness of establishing another Agricultural College at Milledgeville, and yet another at Thomasville.  From what I have already said on the subject of Agricultural Colleges, it may be well inferred, that in my opinion, such institutions are not needed.  One really first-class institution of the kind, such as we have here, is all that the State can support; indeed, even one is more than could be largely supplied with properly prepared students, even if board and clothing were bestowed gratis as well as tuition.  The number of young men who really desire thorough scientific education is small; not a great many could be induced to take it on any terms.  Hence the people seem to be calling for what they really do not need.  But if by Agricultural Colleges they mean good schools, I am free to say that we can scarcely have too many of them.  And if your honorable body can do any-thing to encourage and foster the establishment of such schools, I am sure you will do it.

I should be happy indeed to see the initiative in this direction taken by the University, especially as in this case the schools established would be its feeders and not its rivals.

 

(22)

Chancellor’s Report.

Financial help the University is not able to give, especially if the plan of free tuition be adopted.  Our funds, if scattered in all directions, would be of little service to any body, while, if concentrated here, they suffice to support one grand institution.  Certainly it would not be wise to fritter away a splendid endowment into nothingness; certainly it would be a cruel thing, indeed it would be barbaric cruelty, to destroy a magnificent institution like this, in order to build a half dozen academics on its ruins.  It would be like the vandalism that pulls down solemn temples to obtain materials for less noble purposes.

                        But if the moral power of this University, and of its Trustees and friends, were brought to bear upon our Legislature, a system of high schools, possibly one in each Congressional District, might be established as parts of the University, and under the supervision of your honorable body, which greatly promote the educational interests of our people.

                        I have no matured plan to suggest, but, simply call attention to what has been said in regard to Milledgeville and Thomasville, in order partly to show my sympathy, partly to give some direction to the movement, and partly in the hope that some abler mind may be led to propose something that shall be practicable and satisfactory.  Any plan which will build up, without pulling down, will be a blessing to the community; while, on the other hand, any plan which pulls down, in order that it may build up, not only will do no good, but will, at last, accomplish in full the errand of the destroyer.

It may not be amiss for me to say, in this connection, that the term Agricultural College, as applied to such schools as the people need, is a misnomer, and, like all other misnomers, is a misleader.  In the first place, such schools are not in any sense agricultural.  Practical agriculture can-not be taught at such a

 

(23)

August 1878.

school, nor, indeed, as I think, at any school; and the sciences which underlie the subject of agriculture are altogether too deep, and too broad, and too high for the capacity of boys at school.  All that such boy can do is to learn the beginnings of knowledge, and these are exactly the same for all classes of people, whether farmers, lawyers, doctors, merchants, mechanics, manufacturers, or anything else.  To call a school of this kind agricultural is simply to use a catch-word to take the popular ear, and to furnish a pretext for the use of funds intended for other purposes.

In the second place, such schools are not colleges; it is not possible to supply them with the appliances of a college, and if they were so supplied, the appliances would be of no use, for the students are not sufficiently advanced to be able to appreciate them.  As already said, the State does not produce suitable students in sufficient number to afford a large supply even to one real college, much less to a dozen.  If these mere academics are called colleges, of course they must confer degrees, and boast of their alumni, etc.  Thus are the people misled.  These so-called graduates are soon found to be not at all superior to those who are not graduates, and thus what is supposed to be education is brought into contempt, and the real graduate, who has received a bona fide degree from a real college, is also held at a discount.  Thus the counterfeit, while not lifting itself up, does pull the genuine down.  I protest against all pulling down, and against all counterfeits, and against all misnomers.  We need no more Agricultural Colleges, and certainly we shall have no more of them in fact, even if we should be unwise enough to have them in name.  But some first class academics, where students can be prepared for the most excellent college which we have, are greatly needed;

 

(24)

Chancellor’s Report.

and to encourage the establishment of these at Milledgeville, Thomasville, or elsewhere, has been the object of the foregoing remarks.

Since this Board last met the angel of death has broken its circle.  I cannot close my address without pausing for a moment to pay a tribute to the memory of the Hon. William Hope Hull.  Modest, but wise; unostentatious of merit, but pure; of noble impulses, of genial presence, of few faults, let us hope that, through the merits of the Redeemer, he has been accepted of God; and while we lament his loss, let us hope that God, from His great treasure-house of excellence, will supply his place with another, whose counsels may be as true, whose labors as efficient, and whose character as excellent and engaging.

It is also proper for me to mention, which I do with a very sad heart, the death of my esteemed friend & colleague, Professor George Bancroft.  He was a good officer, and a good man.  He did his duty faithfully and well; he died in the faith, and I have no doubt that his glorious eulogy has been pronounced by the Judge of all the earth.

In conclusion, it affords me the greatest pleasure to say, that during the year the students have usually been quiet, orderly, attentive and industrious.  Occasions of discipline have been wonderfully rare; and if our record could be compared with that of other colleges, I have no doubt that our friends would be exultant with pride and joy.  There have been two little ebullitions of juvenile folly, but these have been sporadic, neither preceded nor succeeded by other disorder, and I have been assured by some of those engaged in them, but nothing was intended more than what was supposed to be harmless sport.  Where I have spoken highly of our students I never meant that they were angels; I have only meant that as college students they will compare favorably with any that I ever saw or ever heard of; and, if it be

 

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August 1878.

thought that this eulogy is too high, all I have to say is, that I and they invite investigation.

In the Faculty, as in all deliberative bodies, differences of opinions have occasionally arisen, but they have always been discussed with dignity and courtesy; and whatever plans have been or may be adopted, there is nothing in the way of hearty and unanimous co-operation.

Commending the University to God, and praying that He will so guide its affairs as to make it a blessing to the State and to the world, I have the honor to be, gentlemen of the Board of Trustees,

                                                                        Your obedient servant,

                                                                                    Henry H. Tucker,

University of Georgia, July 24, 1878.                                        Chancellor.

 

----------Supplementary Report, ----------

of Chancellor.

To the Honorable

                        The Board of Trustees of the

                                                University of Georgia.

Gentlemen,

            The report which has been already presented, was prepared some days ago in order that it might be printed in time for your use.  Events have transpired since then which require official notice.

                                                The Faculty recommended that the following degrees be conferred.

Master of Arts.

William F. Brown.

Bachelor of Arts.

                                    Richard D. Callaway,                Nicholas B. Chennault,

                                    Charles L. Floyd,                      John J. Huguley,

                                    Daniel I. McIntyre,                   Thomas S. Mell,

                                    William L.C. Palmer,                James G. Russell,

                                    George G. Sale,                        James B. Shields,

                                    Paul B. Trammell,                     Benton H. Walton.

 

(26)

 

Chancellor’s Supplementary Report.

Bachelor of Chemical Science.

                                    George H. Jackson,                  Richard J. Mosely,

                                    L. Robert Coates,                     William D. Dearing.

 

Civil Engineer.

Bliss Woodward.

Bachelor of Engineering.

                                    Benjamin M. Gross,                  T. Foster McFarland,

                                                            Moses Michael.

Bachelor of Laws.

Philip W. Davis,                        Thomas W.H. Harris,

Alva C. Lowrey,                       George D. Thomas,

                        Henry H. Tucker Jr.

 

I beg leave also to submit the following Reports, which explain themselves, and to which I respectfully call your attention.

1st, The Report of the President of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts.

2nd, The Report of the Professor of Law.

3rd, The Report of the Librarian.

                        In the haste of preparing my former report for the printer, I omitted to mention several things which I beg to mention now.

A small portrait of Dr. Josiah Meigs, the first President of this University, exquisitely painted on wood, has been presented to the University by Mrs. Catharine Gresham of the County of Greene.  I was obtained from her for the University by the efforts of my excellent friend the Rev. Dr. John Jones of Atlanta who has written in a letter to Dr. William L. Mitchell a history of the picture, including some items of interest in the biography of Dr. Meigs.  I respectfully suggest that the portrait be placed in suitable position in the Library Room of the University; that the thanks of the Board be tendered to Rev. Dr. Jones, and that his letter be spread on the records of the institution; and that some suitable acknowledgement be made to Mrs. Catharine Gresham for her beautiful &

 

(27)

August 1878.

valuable donation.  I beg to say too, that if that acknowledgement were to take pecuniary shape, it would be very acceptable to the excellent and venerable lady; though in justice to her, I must say that she has asked for nothing, and has given no hint that she desires or expects anything.  Still I think it would be becoming if the University should show some appreciation of the generosity of a high-born woman in reduced circumstances.

                        Three years ago I suggested to the Board the propriety of employing Miss Kate Milledge, an excellent artist, to paint for the University a Portrait of her illustrious grandfather Governor John Milledge, the erliest (sic) benefactor of the University and one of its chief founders.  I also made an argument sustaining my views; but in the press of business, what I then said was over-looked.  I beg now to call attention to the subject again, and to request that a Committee be appointed to negotiate with Miss Milledge, and that bounds be prescribed within which the Committee shall have power to act.

In discharge of my official duty I have employed the Rev. James O. Branch of Savannah, to preach the Commencement Sermon.  I request that the usual appropriation be made to defray his expenses.

 

 

 

 

                        Just as I was about to close the Report I received information that the Campus is again in a most deplorable condition on account of scarcity of water.  There is one well which I am informed will probably yield a good supply of water if it were blasted five or six feet deeper, I beg that the subject may be taken into consideration.

                        Respectfully submitted,

                                                H.H. Tucker

                                                            Chancellor.

 

(28)

Chancellor’s Supplementary Report.

To the Honorable

                        The Board of Trustees.

Gentlemen,

            By a strange oversight I neglected in my former Report, to state that since the death of Professor George Bancroft, his duties, which were by no means light, have been faithfully discharged, chiefly, by Professor Rutherford.  A class in Arithmetic has been taught by Professor Lumpkin.

With this exception, the whole burden of extra duty has fallen on Professor Rutherford alone.

                                                                        I have the honor to be

                                                                        Gentlemen,

                                                                                    Your ob’t. s’v’t.

                                                                                                H.H. Tucker

                                                                                                            Chancellor.

 

                        The Chancellor’s Reports with the accompanying documents viz:

The Report of L.J. Charbonnier President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, The Report of Wm. L. Mitchell Professor of Law, and The Report of Wm. M. Brown Librarian were laid on the table and ordered to be referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline when appointed.

                        Mr. Thomas Chairman of the Finance Committee and Mr. Harris Chairman of the Committee on Buildings made their annual Reports which were laid on the table for the present.

The Board then adjourned to 5 o’clock this afternoon.

 

                                                                                                August 2nd 1878. 5. P.M.

The Board met according to adjournment. 

Mr. Vason appeared and took his seat.

Petitions in relation to the Library were presented by Mr. Jackson and by Mr. Stephens and referred to the Committee on the Library.

 

(29)

August 1878.

Mr. Yancey Chairman of the standing Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture submitted his Report which was adopted and is as follows:

                                                                        To the Honorable Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia,

                                                                        Your Committee on Experimental farm, in Department of Agriculture, report;

                                                                        That while the amount of extra labor for the year 1877 was only $14.25, that item for 1878 to date has been $95.45.

This increase of expenses has been reasonable, and is justified by a necessity, which will not arise in the future.

Professor Pendleton resigned the chair of Agriculture & Horticulture, and Dr. Little was elected his successor early in 1877.

Professor Pendleton having left no record of the manner & amount of manure applied to the numerous and respective plats of ground, for several years, no scientific value could be attached to the results of the various crops produced on such plats.  Hence it becomes necessary to make the experiments on other ground which had not been cultivated for a number of years, and upon ground which had to be cleared, each of which pieces would approximate to uniformity.  Four acres of wooded land was cleared, and thoroughly grubbed; and thirteen acres of an old and unfenced field, well matted with Bermuda grass, and tramped by cattle, for many years, in grazing.  These pieces of ground required more than trible(sic) the labor to prepare them for cultivation, and to cultivate than the former regular farm, and a duplication of the horse power usually used on the farm.  An additional expense had to be incurred for lumber, post, nails and work in fencing the 13 acres of old field land.  This expense, and cost of extra labor and farm tools, blacksmithing, and repairing of wagon, present a total expenditure of $225.65.  The wages of the regular labor $200.00.  Making a total of $425.65.  From the present outlook of the growing crops,

 

(30)

Reports of Agriculture & Apparatus.

there will be sufficient income, at fair market prices, after reserving a year supply of grain for the farm horse, to reimburse the Treasury for the above expenditure.

                        For the next year there should be, after meeting all ordinary expenses, sales of the products of the farm sufficient to pay into the Treasure from $200 to $300.

                        There are about 60 cords of wood, of the clearing referred to, on hand, much more than is necessary for next winter’s use, and the surplus may be sold.  The Committee will not ask the usual appropriation, to meet the necessary expenses of the farm, occurring through winter, spring, summer and fall months, before the sales of products can meet them, as the Professor of the chair of Agriculture and Horticulture can retain in his hands a sufficient sum to meet absolute expenses.

                                                                                    {Ben. C. Yancey, Chairman.

                                                                                    {Dav. W. Lewis.

 

                        The standing Committee on Apparatus submitted their report which was laid on the table and subsequently taken up and adopted and is as follows:

                        The Standing Committee on Apparatus beg leave to submit their report:

                                                            The Committee in a body made a personal examination of each Room in Moore College and found every Instrument and Appliance in good order, properly arranged, and ready for use in illustration & experiment.

 The Department under the eyes of Professors Charbonnier and White are very attractive and well worth a visit from every member of the Board and every Alumnus of the University, and every intelligent citizen of Georgia.

The Apparatus of Natural Philosophy has been properly arranged and systematized during the year, and when enriched by a judicious out-lay of the money on hand, will be as complete as most of our best endowed American Colleges and Universities.

The Committee is assured by Professors Charbonnier and

 

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August 1878.

White, that so soon as all the funds generously granted by the Legislature of 1875 are expended they will have a suitable Book, in which will be recorded each piece of Apparatus and other things of permanent value for the use of the Committee, or any member of the Board so that by a yearly examination in detail, it will be an easy matter to ascertain the presence and condition of every article, and to hold the Professors to a rigid accountability!

            The Committee submit the following resolutions and ask their adoption:

                        Resolved, That it is a source of sincere gratification to the Board of Trustees to know that the Departments of Civil Engineering and of Chemistry filled respectively by L.W. Charbonnier and H.C. White are so complete in all their appointments and so ably officered by those gentlemen of science, genius and high culture.

                        Resolved, The the thanks of this Board are due to Professors Charbonnier and White for the cheerful and efficient service rendered by them in performing the duties of the Professorship of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy when it became vacant by the non-acceptance of Col. C.C. Jones and they are hereby thanked.

                                                                                                Respectfully submitted

                                                                                                            Wm. L. Mitchell

                                                                                                                        Chairman

August 2nd. 1878.

 

Wm. L. Mitchell, Chairman of the Prudential Committee submitted an abstract of the proceedings of said Committee since the last annual meeting of the Board which was laid on the table but subsequently taken up and adopted as to such points as require our action viz:

--- 1st. Lot number 3 negotiated to Mr. R.L. Bloomfield for $100.00 was authorized to be sold to him for that

 

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Prudential Committee’s Abstract.

sum, and the President of the Board authorized and requested to execute to him a quit claim deed there for.

---- 2nd. Scholarships were granted to Martin Institute of Jefferson, Jackson County, to the Richmond County High School, and Rome, Male High School and also to the Milledgeville High School, as such scholarships have heretofore been granted other institutions, viz:

                        To each of said Schools three Scholarships, one annually, for the Sophomore Class in the Department of Arts, so that each of said Schools will have a Scholarship to reward their best schollar (sic) every year in perpetuo.  He must be their best schollar (sic).

---- 3rd. The arrangement made with Professor Waddell to allow him to erect at his own expense four rooms with the right to remove them at pleasure, was confirmed.

 

 

 

                                    The Memorial from the Citizens of Cuthbert was referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline when appointed.

Mr. Cobb Chairman of the Standing Committee on the Library submitted his report which was laid on the table

                                    The Standing Committee on Laws and Discipline was appointed by the chair, and consists of Messrs. Toombs, Chairman, Stephens, Pierce, Billups & Brown.

                                    The Board then adjourned to 10 o’clock tomorrow morning.

 

                                                                                    August 3rd. 1878, 10 A.M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Mr. Lawton appeared and took his seat.

The resignation of Mr. Jenkins was read.

The Committee of five of which Mr. Stephens is Chairman, reported, and their report was referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline, without reading.

Mr. Lewis presented the Memorial of the City of Milledgeville which was also referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline.

Mr. Lewis was appointed to invite the Delegates from Mil-

 

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August 1878.

-ledgeville to appear before the Board at this time; whereupon Mr. Crawford and Mayor Walker appeared.

Mr. Crawford advocated the establishment of a College by the Trustees of the University of Georgia at Milledgeville, by Legislative grants as detailed in a bill to be passed by the next Legislature and which bill was referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline.

                        On motion of Genl. Lawton

                                                                                                Mr. Jenkin’s resignation was declined, and his excuse for absence accepted.

Excuses were also made and accepted for Messrs. Hammond, Screven, Seward and Gresham.

                        Mr. Jackson moved to go into the election of a Trustee to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Mr. Hull; which motion prevailed and the Board proceeded to ballot and upon counting out the votes it appeared that His Excellency Alfred H. Colquitt was duly elected.

                        Mr. Toombs Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline reported back to the Board Mr. Stephen’s report as chairman of the Committee of five, and moved its adoption, and it was unanimously adopted, and is as follows:

                        The Committee on Laws and Discipline, to whom was referred the report of the Committee of five appointed at the last session of this Board to whom was referred the following resolution, viz:

                                    “Resolved, That the subject of a return to the curriculum system and the abandonment in whole or in part of what is known as the University system, shall be referred to a select committee of five, to report thereon at the next annual meeting, consulting the Faculty as to said report:”

                                                            beg leave to report, that your committee recommend the adoption of the report of said Committee of five, herewith reported back, and that your Committee be, and is hereby instructed to put the

 

(34)

Report of the Stephens.

recommendations of said Report in the form of a fundamental statute of this University.

                        Mr. Stephens Chairman of the Committee of five read the Report referred to above and which was unanimously adopted and is as follows:

                                                                                                The Committee of five to whom the following resolution ---

                                                “Resolved:  That the subject of return to the Curriculum System, and the abandonment in whole or in part of what is known as the University System, shall be referred to a select Committee of Five, to report thereon at the next Annual Meeting, consulting the Faculty as to said report.” ---

                        was referred at the Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees who have had the same under consideration, and have given it mature thought and reflection.  Two of the Committee, early after the adjournment of the Board at the last Annual Session, visited the University and conferred with the Faculty upon the entire subject.  The evils of the existing system, in the opinion of your committee, were great and glaring.

At first they found considerable diversity of opinion among the Faculty, both as to the existence of any radical evils in the system, and as to the proper remedy - if papers which have been submitted to the Committee on behalf of the Chancellor and the Professors - referred to in his present Annual Report.  The Committee has been exceedingly gratified at the unanimity of the Chancellor and Professors which has been attained on this important subject, and therefore recommend the adoption of the following resolutions:

                        Resolved, That the evils of the system adopted in 1870 are so great as to call for prompt reform.

                        Resolved, That the said system be abandoned & the Curriculum system as now recommended by all the Professors and sanctioned by the Chancellor - as set forth in schedules “A” and “B”, in the papers referred to herein before - be adopted in lieu of the same in this University.

 

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August 1878.

Provided that the graduation of a student and the degree which shall be recommended to be conferred in the Curriculum pursued by him shall be in accordance with the joint judgement of the Faculty, upon the general average of the standing of the student in the whole course, and shall not depend upon the judgement of any one Professor in any department.

 

                        The following are the papers referred to in the foregoing Report of Mr. Stephens,

                        The Faculty of the University of Georgia to the

                                                            Hon. Alex. H. Stephens,

                                                              “     Benj. C. Yancey,

                                                              “     A. R. Lawton

                                                              “      Jos. E. Brown.

                                                                                    Committee.

Gentlemen: -

                        In response to a request of the Honorable Board of Trustees for an expression of opinion, as to the advisability of making any change in the system upon which the Institution is at this time conducted, the Faculty of the University of Georgia, have, individually and as a body, given the matter careful consideration and serious thought, and now in special session met, beg to present to the Board, through your Committee, the following, as an expression of their views.

  1. The Faculty are of opinion that the one course “College Curriculum” system, under which the Franklin College was formerly conducted, is not suited to the present development and extensive scope of the State University.

A return to that system, they believe would seriously impair the efficiency of the University, and, indeed, prove fatal to its existence as a high grade Institution, working in harmony with modern ideas regarding liberal education.

2.   The Faculty are further of opinion that any advance

 

(36)

Curriculum of University Systems.

towards the free and pure University system (as that of Virginia and the Continent) would, at this time, be inexpedient, as unsuitable to the educational condition of our people and not necessary to their present requirements.

  1. As the system under which the University is at present organized, and which was adopted by the Board of Trustees in 1879, is a modified form of both the “Curriculum” and the “University” systems, occupying a position intermediate between the two; and as the combination of Curriculum and selection which it presents, permits the prosecution of the highest and most extensive orders of education, and is, at the same time, perfectly adapted to the character of work which is required of the University by its patrons, the Faculty are of opinion that a rigid adherence to the Curricula of the present established Courses would render any change in the existing system at this time unnecessary.

In support of this opinion the Faculty would respectfully call the attention of the Board of Trustees to the following considerations which have led to its adoption.

  1. The main differences between the old “College” system and the present, (so called) “University” system are:
  2. The existence, at present, of several parallel courses of study, through which students may obtain degrees of graduation; whereas, formerly, but one uniform course was recognized.
  3. The requirement, at present made, that the student shall obtain a certificate of proficiency in each of the studies belonging to his proper course; whereas, formerly, but an average proficiency in all of the studies was required.
  4. The permission now accorded to students to select, at the beginning of the Junior year, the course of study (but not the studies themselves) which they may wish to pursue; when as, formerly, with but one, uniform course,

 

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August 1878.

no such selection could be exercised.

  1. As a result of the above, the present independence of each Department or School of the University, whereby increased proficiency in each is secured at the same time that mutual adaptability & harmony in the several courses of study are preserved.
  2. While the old “A.B.” course - in the working of which the venerable Franklin College graduated many Alumni - is, therefore, preserved in the present organization in all of its integrity and unchanged - save in the matter of increased proficiency as above noted - the expansion into the State University, with the addition of new School Departments, has required the creation of new courses of study and new graduation degrees.  This requirement has simply been met by the expansion from the old “College” to the present modified form of the “University” system.
  3. The Schools of Modern Languages and of History and Political Science, and several new Schools of Natural Science are the special outgrowth of the University organization.  These Departments are deemed of paramount importance to an Institution which professes to furnish opportunities for instruction in all recognized branches of higher education.  Under the old organization no provision was made for these Departments in the regular course.  In the present system they are provided for by the arrangement of several courses, in some of which the Modern Languages and Natural Sciences replace the Classics of the “A.B.” course.  Thus opportunities are offered for the attainment of a collegiate education through several distinct channels.
  4. The creation, in 1870, of the State College of Agriculture & Mechanic Arts as a co-ordinate Department of the State University, with distinct educational objects & purposes - in part prescribed by law - and its incorporation into the organization under the one Faculty and officers, found the then existing system

 

(38)

Curriculum & University Systems.

inadequate to comply with the requirement of the new Institution.  A change was, in consequence, imperatively demanded.  Under the working of the present system the peculiar demands of the State College have been readily met & no serious difficulties have been experienced in the harmonious conduct of the new and the old Institutions.

  1. In view of the foregoing facts, the Faculty believe that it could be impossible to return to the former one - course, “College” system and at the same time to retain the present organization of the State University - give to each School even a very moderate proportion of the schedule and provide for the attainment of an academic degree within the period of time (4 years) usually considered proper for a college course - without such overcrowding of labor upon the students as would, undoubtedly, be, in every way, injurious.  Such return would also necessitate the complete severance from the Academic Department of the State College, and, with it, of the School of Modern Languages and several Schools of Natural Science and the erection of these into a distinct Institution with a separate Faculty and separate Officers.
  2. The Faculty would call attention to the fact that - as hereintofore asserted - the present is not a “University” system, in the sense that such is employed in the German Universities or in the University of Virginia in this country.  It is a modified for of this.  It is a University system, in that several distinct Academic and Professional Degrees are conferred & several corresponding courses of study presented.  It is essentially a Curriculum system offering, not a close, one course Curriculum, but several Curricula.  Indeed, our system is, in no sense, a copy, but an original one, though eclectic, adapted to the genius of our people, and constructed to meet, according to the times, the wants of the class of students why usually apply to us for instruction.  While it maintains, intact, the time honored College Curriculum,

 

 

 

 

 

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it adopts those features of the University system, modified, which make it possible to meet all the demand for scientific instruction, and rejects all those that can by any possibility work injury.  The Faculty respectfully ask the attention of the Board of Trustees to the following particulars, illustrative of the above assertions.

  1. For the Freshman classes of the several courses, and, in great part, also, for the Sophomore classes, our system prescribes a close Curriculum which is, essentially, the old College classical course.  Students thus receive a momentum tending to impel them in a line towards the “A.B” degree.  Thus, the system not only retains and endorses the disciplinary studies, but exerts a special influence in their favor.
  2. Those entering the Junior class have, according to the system, the privilege of choosing, it is true, but not so much the studies they will pursue as the degrees they will seek to secure.  The Faculty, with the sanction of the Board of Trustees, have presented close curricula, terminating in appropriate degrees.  From these the student can select one, and the system holds him rigidly to the studies of the one thus selected.
  3. Unlike the Virginia and the European University systems, this subjects students to examination upon all prescribed College exercises, and enforces such attendance by all the means found efficacious by the old time Colleges, keeps a record of standing in the daily recitations and in the frequent examinations that are held, and requires that monthly reports be made to parents of the attendance of their sons upon University duties and of the degree of proficiency in their studies - that, thus failure to “rise” on the part of the student may be prevented, or, if not, that he and his parent may have fair and

 

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timely warning of it.

In this connection, the Faculty beg to say, that the present standard of admission to the University, should not, in their opinion be changed.  It is neither too high, nor too low.  It is not higher than is attainable by an ordinary student in a good preparatory School or Academy, and it is not lower than that of other Colleges of high standing.  While for a time, perhaps, a rigid adherence to this standard may diminish the number of students in attendance, it will ultimately result in increasing their number, because it will stimulate the teachers and pupils of the preparatory Schools to greater effort, and will secure patronage by establishing public confidence in the maintenance of the high standard of education which has been adopted.

The system thus employs all those methods and appliances which are usually efficacious to secure persistent application to duties and proficiency in studies, and thus it is adapted to students of the age of those who usually come to us.

The combination, as above set forth, of Curriculum with a certain freedom of selection, is believed by the Faculty to be, at this time, the best arrangement, both for the students and for the University.

  1. While we claim that the independence of each University School and a stated proficiency in each study of a course, are features which greatly increase the efficiency of the Institution, it is but candid to admit that the system gives great power to one man, which may be abusively used; but experience we think has shown that such danger can be easily obviated, and those of us who have misgivings on this point are willing to waive them and unite with the others in the recommendation that the system be preserved intact.
  2. The Faculty deem it but fair to state that - owing to several causes, among which may be enumerated:

1st. The imperfect preparation for the regular courses of

 

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many students who apply for admission to the University:  the necessity on the part of many of limiting their time of attendance to one or two years only, and the great desire on the part of these and their parents that they should be permitted to devote their attention to special departments to the exclusion of others:

2nd. The great disinclination of the Faculty to close the doors of the Institution to any worthy student, or oppose an obstacle to his desires;

3rd. Radical changes which, within the past few years, have occurred in the organization of the Faculty itself;  They have not, of late, insisted upon so rigid adherence to the strict curricula as might, perhaps, have otherwise been required.  They have in a number of instances granted permission to individual students to select certain studies and to make such changes in the order of their studies as were not contemplated by, or provided for, in the regular schemes of the course Curricula.  This has occasioned a certain degree of irregularity, and given rise to some confusion in the working of the regular schedule.  The facts have ever been present to the minds of the Faculty as a possible evil and a source of regret.  Attention has recently been forcibly called to the matter, and the magnitude, and the dangerous tendency of the evil pointed out.  It has not been found possible to guard privileges - originally accorded for what were regarded as praiseworthy purposes - from a certain measure of abuse, and some dissatisfaction has arisen in the Faculty with the present working of the schedule.

The matter has, therefore been recently made the subject of serious thought and discussion by the Faculty and, through a committee appointed for the purpose, they have arranged a satisfactory and harmonious schedule, embracing all departments and adapted to all the regular course Curricula.  It has been found necessary to make a few changes in the requirements for certain degrees and in the status of certain others.

 

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Though not regarded as strictly germane to the question at present before them, the Faculty take this occasion to lay before the Board of Trustees, through your Committee, the appendix (A.) to this report, which sets forth the scheme regarded by them as proper for the regulation of the Academic and University Degrees, and which, in comparison with the present scheme (see Annual Catalogue, 1877, pages 7-9) will exhibit the few changes in those particulars which are designed to be made.  To these, they respectfully ask the sanction of the Board.

And that your committee may have information as to the perfect harmony and smoothness with which the several Curricula, so modified, may be conducted, they further present an appendix (B.) embracing the condensed schedule of hours for each Department and each Curriculum which the Faculty have recently adopted.

The Faculty have, further unanimously adopted resolutions which it is designed, shall appear in the next Annual Catalogue, to the effect that all students shall be held rigidly to the Curricula of the courses of their selection, & that no changes of studies shall be at any time permitted, and no change of course within the collegiate year.  By these measures the Faculty confidently believe that all danger of confusion and complication, incident to the evil above mentioned, can be averted.

It is proper to add that the majority of the Faculty are of decided opinion - and, in view of the previous sections of this report, deem further argument unnecessary to sustain the position - that the evil mentioned is to be, in my wise, attributed to any peculiarity of, or defect in the system upon which the University is organized, but is, in whole, due to the causes heretofore enumerated in this section.  And the extreme case with which measures have been introduced to correct the evil and secure general satisfaction within the system itself and without change in its integrity is - it would appear - but an additional proof of the perfect adaptability of the present organization to the needs of the Institution.  They, therefore, recognize no necessity for a change in the system at

 

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this time.

Those of us who think otherwise, and are inclined to discredit the system by reason of dissatisfactions which have arisen in its working, are content, now that measures have been adopted which the evils of which they complain may be corrected and satisfaction secured.

  1. The Faculty have above noted only such points as are connected with the practical working of our own University and relate to its own peculiar needs and requirements.  They have not thought it necessary or proper to present arguments - well known to and appreciated by the Board - such as are generally employed in discussing the respective merits of the “College” and the “University” systems, viewed as distinct from any special Institution.

They need but refer to the circumstance that the wisdom of the Board in adopting the present system, has been amply endorsed, by the fact that nearly all of the State and leading Institutions throughout the country have adopted or are rapidly adopting similar systems for their conduct.

                        The present organization of the University of Georgia is, therfore, in perfect harmony with the leading ideas regarding modern liberal education.

                                    University of Georgia, Jan. 8th, 1878.

The above report is respectfully submitted to the Hon. Board of Trustees, through your Committee, and in token of their unanimity of opinion, the members of the Faculty have the honor hereto to affix their signatures:

*

Chancellor.

P. H. Mell,

Prof. Metaphysics & Ethics,

Williams Rutherford,

Prof. Mathematics.

Wm. Henry Waddell,

Prof. Ancient Languages

L. H. Charbonnier,

Prof. Engineering.

 

 

 

 

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C. P. Wilcox,

Prof. Modern Languages.

H. C. White,

Prof. Chemistry.

Wm. M. Browne,

Prof. History & Political Science.

Eustace W. Speer,

Prof. Belles Letters and Rhetoric.

W. W. Lumpkin,

Prof. English Language and Literature.

George Little,

Prof. Natural History and Geology.

*  Not signing.

 

Appendix A.

 

Requirements for Degrees.

  1. University Degrees.
  2. Master of Arts.

This Degree, the highest honor awarded, will be conferred on those students only, who obtain certificates of Proficiency in ten of the Academic Schools, viz:  1, Latin; 2, Greek; 3, Modern Languages; 4, Belles Letters; 5, Metaphysics and Ethics; 6, Pure Mathematics; 7, Natural Philosophy & Astronomy; 8, Chemistry; 9, History and Political Science; 10, Natural History and Geology.

Note: - The course for this Degree is a five year’s course, beginning with the Freshman Class.

2. Civil Engineer.

This Degree will be conferred on those students, who having passed the examinations required for the degree of Bachelor of Engineering, will complete, in addition, a special higher course in the Department of Applied Mathematics, of Chemistry and of Modern Languages.

3.  Bachelor of Law.

This Degree will be conferred on those students who satisfactorily complete the course prescribed in the School of Law.

 

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4.  Doctor of Medicine.

This Degree will be conferred on those students who satisfactorily complete the course prescribed in the Medical College of Georgia, located at Augusta.

  1. Franklin College Degrees

1. Bachelor of Arts.

This Degree will be conferred on those students who obtain certificates of Proficiency in the Schools of:  1, Latin; 2, Greek; 3, Metaphysics and Ethics; 4, Belles Letters and Rhetoric; 5, History and Political Science; 6, Geology, and Certificates of Merit in ; 1, Junior Mathematics; 2, General Chemistry; 3, Natural Philosophy and Astronomy.

2.  Bachelor of Science.

This Degree will be conferred on those students who obtain Certificates of Proficiency in the Schools of:  1, Two Languages, one Ancient and one Modern; 2, Mathematics; 3, Natural Philosophy & Astronomy; 4, Chemistry; 5, Natural History and Geology, and Certificates of Merit in; 1, Metaphysics & Ethics.

3.  Bachelor of Philosophy.

This Degree will be conferred on those students who obtain Certificates of Proficiency in the Schools of:  1, Two Languages - one of which may be an Ancient Language; 2, Metaphysics and Ethics; 3, Belles Letters and Rhetoric; 4, History & Political Science; 5, Geology, and Certificates of Merit in; 1, Junior Mathematics; 2, General Chemistry; 3, Natural Philosophy and Astronomy.

  1. State College Degrees.

1.  Bachelor of Agriculture.

This Degree will be conferred on those students who obtain Certificates of Proficiency in the Schools of:  1, Agriculture; 2, Natural History and Geology; 3, Chemistry; 4, English Language and Literature; & Certificates of Merit in :  1, French or German; 2, Natural Philosophy & Astronomy; 3, The proper courses in Applied Mathematics, Analytical Chemistry & Industrial Drawing.

 

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2.  Bachelor of Engineering.

This Degree will be conferred on those students who obtain Certificates of Proficiency in the Schools of:  1, Applied Mathematics; 2, Mathematics; 3, Natural Philosophy and Astronomy; 4, Chemistry; 5, Natural History and Geology, (as prescribed in the regular schedule,) and Certificates of Merit in; 1, French or German; 2, The proper course in Analytical Chemistry.

3.  Bachelor of Chemical Science.

This Degree will be conferred on those students who obtain Certificates of Proficiency in the Schools of; 1, Analytical Chemistry; 2, Chemistry; 3, Natural History and Geology; 4, Modern Languages (French and German,) and Certificates of Merit in; 1, Belles Letters and Rhetoric; 2, Natural Philosophy and Astronomy; 3, The proper course in Industrial Drawing.

D.  Honorary Degrees.

Including “Master of Agriculture” - late an Academic Degree - are conferred by special vote of the Board of Trustees.

The Faculty would recommend that students should not be permitted to enter the University until they have attained the age of sixteen years, without special permission of the Faculty.

Very few boys younger than this, even when they have the best means of preparation, are sufficiently mature, mentally, to comprehend the purpose of desire the full advantage of a Collegiate Education, or sufficiently mature, normally, to bear without injury the sudden transition from the restraints of home or of a properly regulated Academy, to the comparative freedom and self government, necessarily exercised by University Students.  The tendency to complete education when it ought to be commencing is false in theory and practice, and equally pernicious to moral, mental and physical health.

 

 

 

 

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Appendix, B.--- Condensed Schedule.

Showing the number of hours per week in each School required in the Degree Curricula. (Click Here For Scan of Table)

 

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POSTSCRIPT.

It is to be regretted that the above, presented by the Professors, differs from the views of the Chancellor which follow; but nothing is more common than for men honestly to differ.  Without, then, admitting that the criticisms on our paper by our distinguished associate are correct or formally attempting to reply to any position in his, we have the honor to comply with the request of the Committee of the Board of Trustees by transmitting to their Chairman the above as our mature views as to the best system of organization for the University of Georgia.

                                                                                                THE PROFESSORS.

 

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To Messrs. A. H. Stephens, Ben. C. Yancey, A. R. Lawton, and Joseph E. Brown, Committee, & c.

Gentlemen: - The following is a copy of the Resolution of the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia under which you were appointed, and in compliance with the provisions of which, the Faculty have expressed their views on the subject therein indicated, to-wit:

“Resolved: - That the subject of return to the Curriculum System, and the abandonment in whole or in part of what is known as the University system, shall be referred to a select Committee of five, to report thereon at the next Annual Meeting, consulting the Faculty as to said report.”

I have thought proper to withhold my signature from the document which accompanies this, and which has been signed by my esteemed Colleagues of the Faculty.  My reasons for so doing, will appear in the following pages:

Before stating the points on which I differ with my Colleagues, I will name the particulars in which I agree with them.

  1. I concur in the opinion expressed by them, that it is expedient at this time to have more than one Curriculum of study.
  2. I most heartily agree with them in the opinion that “any advance towards the free and pure University System would be unsuited to the educational condition of our people.”  On this subject, there can be but one opinion among those who have given the subject fair consideration.  The experiment which we have been making for the last six years, (disastrously as I think,) must have convinced the most ardent advocate of the University System, “free and pure” that however excellent the thing may be in itself, it is wholly unadapted to the wants of the people of Georgia, and that any attempt to establish it here would result in mortifying failure.  We indeed, have not had the University System in its fulness (sic); but we have

 

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had enough to convince everybody that we want no more.  I therefore heartily indorse the expression used by my Colleagues that any advance in this direction would be inexpedient.

  1. I agree with my brethren of the Faculty that there has been with us, “a certain degree of irregularity and some confusion.”  I however, should use stronger language.  I should say, that there has been a very great degree of irregularity, and most distressing confusion.  But irregularity and confusion even in the smallest degree, are not to be tolerated in an Institution like this.  The perfection of order is indispensable.  The facts which the Faculty refer to, have been with me as with them, “a source of regret.”  I should say, of the profoundest regret.  I had reference to these facts, in the Report which I had the honor to make to the Board of Trustees last August; and it is this part of my report, to which the Faculty allude; when they say (page 7 at the top,) that “attention has recently been forcibly called to the matter, and the magnitude and dangerous tendency of the evil pointed out.”

I agree with my Colleagues, that, “it has not been found possible (italics mine) to guard certain privileges from a certain measure of abuse.”  I agree in the statement that “some dissatisfaction has arisen in the Faculty with the present working of the schedule.”  I should say the intensest (sic) dissatisfaction.

I suppose there may be good reasons why my Colleagues and myself, while agreeing as to the facts, would differ in the strength of the expressions used by us respectively, to describe them.  In the first place, the present state of things came upon them by degrees; they have thus in a measure become accustomed to it, and while not very patient under the discipline, they have learned to endure.  The facts came upon me all at once; I had never seen such “irregularities” and such “confusion” before, nor did I dream that such things could exist; and being suddenly placed in position where I was to a

 

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great extent responsible for regularity and order, I was overwhelmed and confounded.

In the second place, while my esteemed Colleagues are doubtless interested, just as I am, in the general welfare of the whole Institution, yet each of them is, & I am sure ought to be; particularly concerned about his own Department.  So long as he can get that to working well, he fells(sic) that his chief duty is discharged; his duty in other directions, being if not merely collateral, and if not less imperative, yet less of a burden on his mind.  With me the case is diferent (sic); different, simply because I am in a different position.  To me all Departments are alike.  I take equal interest in each; I look on the Institution as a whole; I see all the trouble; I feel it all; my Colleagues carry each his own burden; I carry all their burdens. By no means do I imply, that any one of them is, in the slightest degree wanting in public spirit, or in any other honorable and excellent trail; I only mean that it is not possible for one who is not a presiding officer, to feel the responsibility of one who is.  Perhaps any one of them, if he occupied my stand-point, would regard the situation just as I do.  They have stated the facts correctly in the merely positive terms they have used; perhaps if they stood where I do, they could be inclined as I am; to resort to superlatives.  They may think that I am mistaken in this; if so, I reply that no man can know what he would do, or how he would feel under given circumstances, until he is tried.

  1. Having said this much, it is scarcely necessary to add, that I agree with my brethren of the Faculty in the opinion that change of some kind is necessary.
  2. It affords me the greatest pleasure to say, that on the whole, I acquiesce in the remedy proposed, by my Colleagues, for the evils of which we all complain.  They propose in Appendix A. three degrees for Franklin College, and three for the State College; with one post-graduate degree

 

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in each.  I should be much better pleased, if the number of degrees were reduced by at-least one half.  In my report of August last, I recommended the fusion of the two Colleges into one, and the establishment of three, and only three courses of study.  I am still of the opinion that the plan proposed by me, if it were practicable, would be highly expedient.  But the decision of the Board is, that certain legal difficulties, render the fusion of the two Institutions impossible.  Of course I accept their decision, and have nothing more to say on that subject.  But as I myself recommend three courses of study for one College; it could seem that I am bound to allow six courses for two Colleges.  I yield to the force of this mathematical argument; but I will say in yielding that I regard it as a misfortune, that so many courses should be presented by our Institution, which though consisting of two distinct Departments, is yet essentially, and for most purposes a unit.

I furthermore believe that even with the two Colleges as we have them, side by side, it would be better to have three courses of study instead of six.  Still, I yield; I yield partly to the logic which shows that two Colleges ought to have twice as many degrees as one; partly to the opinions and wishes of my Colleagues; and I heartily unite with them in recommending that the course proposed in Appendix A, be adopted.  I have been led by the arguments of my Colleagues, to hope, if not to believe, that the plan will work smoothly and satisfactorily; but if on trial it be found to produce results at all like those of the last few years, I shall hope to see it abandoned.

In regard to the post-graduate degree of A. M. I have some misgivings.  If it were described as a post graduate degree; if it were distinctly stated that no student could begin the course of study marked out for it, without previously taking one of the College degrees; and if no special course were necessary except one of

 

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the six laid down, I should be perfectly satisfied.  But if a course is to be built up from the bottom, thereby increasing the number of courses to seven instead of six, I think we shall be apt to see some of the “confusion” which we experience under the present system.  The Faculty however consider that the points just made by me, though not distinctly expressed, are clearly implied, and several of the most experienced among them, have assured me that no separate Curriculum for this degree, except as a post graduate degree, will be required.  With this understanding I am satisfied with the degree as set forth in Appendix A.  Should experience show that it is liable to the objections above mentioned.  I shall hope to see a new arrangement made.

The post-graduate degree in the State College, to-wit, the degree of Civil Engineer, is described as I would have it, and to this I have no objection.

  1. By far the most important change recommended by my Colleagues, is expressed in very few words, and occupies so small a part of their report, that it will scarcely be noticed; but in fact, it means more than all the rest that they have said.  In it is the germ of revolution.  It is in the form of a resolution adopted by them, (bottom of page 7) that every student shall be held rigidly to the course of his selection; that no change of studies shall be permitted at any time, and no changes of course within the Collegiate year; it is moreover implied if not expressed by the word rigidly as above used, that no student can select the order of studies pursued by him.  He must take the whole course prescribed for one year; neither more nor less and can substitute no study for any other.  By this it will be seen that the old fashioned, time honored system of strict Curriculum from beginning to end, is adopted; and this will relieve us of many, if not of most of those enormous evils, which have been the scourge of the Institution for the last six years.

 

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An almost illiterate, or half educated boy cannot dictate to the Faculty what course he will pursue; a whimsical student cannot select such studies as suit his wild fancy; an unstable and fickle minded youth, having tried one course and finding it not to suit his taste or his caprice, cannot by petition to the Faculty or otherwise change his course; an indolent student cannot shirk from labor by selecting for himself what he may suppose to be an easy course.  Abuses are next to impossible.  Six rigid courses are marked out by wise men, all of them experts.  Each of these courses is good, some however being much better than others, but all are equal in the amount of labor required.  The student may select either of these six courses, and beyond that he has no choice.  The element of time is also introduced; the student is under no temptation to telescope four years into three, or three years into two.  He must take exactly as much study as is good for hi and no more.  He will have neither more nor less than any other student.  Having taken his course, it will require exactly a year to finish it; thus the length of time required to finish a given amount of work will be judged of by the Faculty, and not by an inexperienced boy.

In other words, the college is put back exactly to where it was fifty years ago, in every respect except one, and that is that there are six courses of study instead of one course.  Three I think, might be an improvement; six I believe to be twice too many.  Still as already said, I acquiesce in this; and to the change above described, which deprives the student of all control over his education, except to select one of the prescribed Curricula, and which puts him after this selection is made, entirely under the control of the Faculty, I agree with all my heart.

The change just described is so radical and so important, being in fact a complete change in the whole genius of the Institution, it ought not in my

 

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opinion to depend on a mere resolution of the Faculty.  True, after we once again get back to the smooth and harmonious working of things which existed before the University system was introduced, when there were no jarrings and jostlings, and no friction, I think the present Faculty at least, will be under no temptation to return to the condition from which we are just about to emerge.  Still, the fundamental law of the Institution ought to rest on the authority of the Board of Trustees.  I therefore most earnestly recommend, that the resolution of the Faculty be shaped into law, and enacted by authority of the Board.

I said in a former paragraph that there is only one point of difference between the plan now proposed by the Faculty, and that which existed years ago.  This is practically true, or if not, it is at least a very close approximation to a strict statement of the facts.  There is one other point, in which there seems to be a difference, but it is more in seeming than in reality.

Formerly, the student graduated on the average of his standing in all his studies.  Now, he must receive a certificate from each Professor.  It has been wisely objected to this, that it gives too much power to one man.  An eccentric officer might defeat the graduation of the best student, or in fact of a whole class; each and every officer having the power of absolute veto over all the rest, a veto from which there is no appeal.  This certainly seems to be a dangerous power, and one which it is not safe to trust in the hands of any man.

Practically however, it seems to give no trouble.  The understanding among the members of the Faculty is, that if a students’ general standing is good, no one officer will interpose insuperable objections to his graduation, unless in case of gross deficiency; and in that case he could scarcely expect to graduate

 

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under any system.  Several cases have actually occurred within the last three years, where students deficient in one or more Departments, have been allowed to graduate, just as they would have done when graduation was based on average standing.  Hence while it is true that technically, and in mere form, the independence of Schools is maintained, the final results are nearly, if not exactly what they always were.  Under the circumstances, it can scarcely be claimed that this is a feature of the University system; but if it be, then I unite with other members of the Faculty, in waiving my objections to it, for the present at least.  It may be said in favor of the plan, that its tendency is to prevent the student from neglecting one department, with the hope of retrieving himself in another; and I must admit that in this respect, the results have been good.

Thus far, gentlemen of the Committee, I have said nothing, certainly I have intended to say nothing which contravenes any view presented by the majority of the Faculty, yet, there seems to be a great difference between their report and mine.  The reasons of this, I think are as follows:

1st  The facts spoken of by them in mild terms, have been described by me in strong terms.  But there is no contradiction.  Perhaps if we were to exchange places; we might exchange forms of expression.  I might use the mild terms, and they the strong; but in no case, could there be any difference as to the facts.

2nd  Facts which they have spoken of in general terms, or have barely alluded to, have been set forth by me more fully and in detail, and thus a different impression is produced.

3rd  The radical change which they propose, is so briefly expressed as scarcely to be noticed, while I have made it very conspicuous; and thus a wholly different complexion is given to the two reports.

These differences are simply those of degree; yet they are important; so much so that I could not con-

 

 

 

 

 

 

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-scientiously agree to the document prepared by them; and I suppose they would be equally unwilling to subscribe to what I have written.

There is between us however, a difference of another character, a difference not merely of degree; I scarcely know whether to call it a difference in matter of opinion or in matter of fact.  The state of the case is this:

1st  I attribute the evils which all admit, to the existence of the University system so-called, which has been in operation here for six years.  The majority of the Faculty, attribute these evils to the manner in which they themselves have administered the system.  They take the blame upon themselves; I put it on the system.

2nd  They believe that the changes propose, and to which I agree, are changes not in the system, but merely in its administration.  To me on the contrary, the changes appear to be nothing less than fundamental in the system itself.

In consequence of these differences the general tenor of all that they have said, produces the impression that they are making a labored argument in favor of the University system as we have it; and I am sure that the tenor of what I have said, must be to the effect that I hold that system in the highest possible esteem.  Yet we agree as to the evil, and we agree as to the remedy.  The difference appears to be about names rather than about things; and it would seem that with only such a difference as this we ought to be able to work together in harmony.  So indeed we can.  I shall most heartily co-operate with the majority of the Faculty in carrying out the - what shall I call it?  I should call it the new system; they would call it a new administration of the present system.  By whatever name it be called there is no contention among us, nor is there likely to be.  As the Faculty have acceded in substance, to the plan proposed by me in my report of last August, perhaps I ought not to complain of their nomenclature.  Nor

 

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would I, if I thought that no harm would come of it.  But I think it important that things should be called by their right names.  A misnomer is sure to be a misleader.  If we really have abolished the University system, no good can come from saying, as we do virtually by retaining the name, that we have not done it.  It puts us in a false position; it excites false expectations; it fills our minds with a false ideal; and we shall be always trying to work up to a false standard; it is in short a misstatement of the fact, and no misstatement of fact, ever yet resulted in anything but harm.  On the other hand, if we have not abolished the system we ought not to say directly or indirectly that we have done it; and hence in this case the name ought to be retained.  In either case, the name, which is virtually a statement of fact, ought not to correspond with the fact.  Hence the question is not one of mere phraseology and therefore unimportant; it is a question of fact, the wrong decision of which, might lead to much trouble.

What then is the fact?  Opposite answers to this question are honestly given by the majority of the Faculty, and by myself.

In support of my view that the evils complained of, are the outgrowth of the system, I have to say in the first place, that the evils were never heard of until this system was introduced.  This is prima facie evidence, at least, that the system is the cause of the trouble.  In the second place, the members of the Faculty, most of them highly experienced officers, have done their best for six years to get the thing to working smoothly, and have not succeeded; and the inference is strong that if such a body of men, cannot make it a success in that length of time, it cannot be done at all.  Finally, that the trouble is inherent in the system itself, appears from its acknowledged features.

 

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August 1878.

For example, we have as the Trustees seem to suppose, a former class; it appears to me, and I think also to some of the Faculty, if not to all of them, that we have no particular class that can be called Juniors, but that we have various Junior classes, and also various Senior classes; while the University system as it is explained by its advocates, teaches that we have neither Junior nor Senior classes, but only Senior and Junior studies.  If we have a Junior class, the Faculty themselves do not know who are Juniors, nor yet do the students.  In 1875 we came near having a rebellion among our best students, because the Faculty awarded Junior honors to some whom the students did not regard as Juniors.  The Faculty were divided on the question, and finally decided by a close vote, that if a student had four Junior studies, he should be allowed to compete for Junior honors; though other Juniors have eight studies, thus making the honors accessible to one student, on half the terms required of another.  This is the case to this day; nor do I see how under the present “system” the crying injustice can be remedied.  It was possible until two years and a half ago, for a student to compete for honors in two different classes, and to speak on one day as Sophomore, and on the next as a Junior.  For this last anomaly, a remedy has been found, in the law prohibiting more than 18 recitations per week, - a law which is in direct antagonism to the whole genius of the University system.  It is possible even now, for a student to compete for Sophomore or Junior honors, for two or three successive years.  It is possible even now, for a student to be Freshman in one class, Sophomore in another, Junior in another, and Senior in another; and the system is so contrived, as to encourage the presence of these nondescripts.

Much of this, if not all of it, arises from the fact

 

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August 1878.

For example, we have as the Trustees seem to suppose, a former class; it appears to me, and I think also to some of the Faculty, if not to all of them, that we have no particular class that can be called Juniors, but that we have various Junior classes, and also various Senior classes; while the University system as it is explained by its advocates, teaches that we have neither Junior nor Senior classes, but only Senior and Junior studies.  If we have a Junior class, the Faculty themselves do not know who are Juniors, nor yet do the students.  In 1875 we came near having a rebellion among our best students, because the Faculty awarded Junior honors to some whom the students did not regard as Juniors.  The Faculty were divided on the question, and finally decided by a close vote, that if a student had four Junior studies, he should be allowed to compete for Junior honors; though other Juniors have eight studies, thus making the honors accessible to one student, on half the terms required of another.  This is the case to this day; nor do I see how under the present “system” the crying injustice can be remedied.  It was possible until two years and a half ago, for a student to compete for honors in two different classes, and to speak on one day as Sophomore, and on the next as a Junior.  For this last anomaly, a remedy has been found, in the law prohibiting more than 18 recitations per week, - a law which is in direct antagonism to the whole genius of the University system.  It is possible even now, for a student to compete for Sophomore or Junior honors, for two or three successive years.  It is possible even now, for a student to be Freshman in one class, Sophomore in another, Junior in another, and Senior in another; and the system is so contrived, as to encourage the presence of these nondescripts.

Much of this, if not all of it, arises from the fact

 

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Curriculum & University Systems.

that the system is incongruous.  When it was first set on foot, all Commencement honors were abolished except for the graduating class, as under the circumstances they ought to have been, for this is just what the system required.  But this innovation was not satisfactory, and the old-fashioned Commencement exercises were re-introduced; and the new and the old systems did not fit each other; they could not be made to work together, and they never have done it, and they never will.

As may be inferred from what has been said, the system is hard to understand.  More than one officer has worked under it for years without understanding it; and a thing which is so hard to be understood is sure to be variously understood; & variously misunderstood; and such a thing as this may fairly be called unintelligible; and can be of not practical use, and must give rise to just such a jumble of experiences as we have had; and ought to be abolished, and as I think is I abolished by the plan now proposed.

I admit that for several years past, there has been a great improvement in our operations.  But the reason of this is, that one by one, the University features have been dropped off, and the College has been gravitating back to its original healthy condition.  The greatest improvement took place, when at my suggestion the number of recitations per week, which a student might take was reduced to eighteen.  This was a half mortal stab to the University system.  Previous to that change the student could take as many studies as he pleased; and was actually encouraged to do two years work in one, and some of them actually took 25 or 30 recitations per week.  All this was in full keeping with the genius of the new system, and put a premium, as any one must see, on systematic cramming the superficial learning, besides

 

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August 1878.

Leading to the ruin of the students health.  The action of the Board in prohibiting the number of recitations per week to exceed 18, changed all this; it introduced directly, the element of time, and thus swept away half of the University system.  The action now recommended by the Faculty, will in my opinion, sweep away substantially, the other half.

            This leads me to say in support of my opinion that the change proposed by the Faculty is a change in the System, and not in the administration; that, we shall have an absolutely close Curriculum for every student.  We shall not encourage the student to get through college as soon as possible, but will detain him as long as he ought to stay.  We shall not have some students completing a course in two years, while another student will complete the same course in one year.  All who take the same course will get through in exactly the same time.  It was the pride and boast of the University system, that the element of time was wholly eliminated.  I quote from page 38 our latest Catalogue (Art. V.)

“The time spent in College, is not an element necessary for a degree, but qualification alone, as shown in the examinations.  The time required to complete any course, will depend alone, upon the preperation(sic), diligence and ability of the student.”

            Under the new regime, the element of time is one of the principal factors.  We shall not have some students taking 15 recitations, some 16, some 17, some 18, and some 20 or 30 or more.  All will have exactly the same number, 18 neither more nor less.  There will be no difficulty in deciding who is or who is not, a Junior or a Senior.  There will be no variation in the order in which studies may be taken as is now allowed. (See page 16 of the Catalogue.)  Students will not petition the Faculty as they do now almost every week, to drop Mathematics,

 

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Curriculum & University Systems.

or Greek, or something else, and “take up the study next year”; and there will be no substitutes of one study for another.  There will be no conflict of hours such as we now have, where a student is due at two different places at the same time; conflicts which the most skillful Engineers of College schedules have to this day found it impossible to avoid.  Our whole course ever since I have been in the Institution, has been strewed with the wrecks caused by these inevitable collisions.  There will be no more of this.  It will not be necessary as it has always been heretofore, for the Faculty at the beginning of every year, to spend from one to two or three weeks, taxing mortal ingenuity to its utmost to arrange a schedule for daily work.  One schedule unless there should be a change in the organization of the Faculty, will last for a decade.  We shall have no features incongruous with each other.  The system will be harmonious with itself.  It is not hard to understand; there can be no differences of opinion about it; it is not eclectic; it is not original; it is not new; it is nothing but the old College system, with several courses instead of one.

                        With a fixed standard of admission to every class, whether the student expects to graduate or not; with fixed Curricula; with fixed amount of study, uniform throughout; with fixed order of study; and with fixed length of time, the same for all; the student after selecting his course, having no control of anything, and the Faculty having complete control of every thing; it appears to me that there is not a shred of the University system left, except the base fact that we have several courses instead of one, each terminating in an appropriate degree.  This solitary fact is not enough to fasten the name of “University system,” on the plan herewith proposed.  A knife with a new handle can a new blade, might have fastened on its side the plate from the

 

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August 1878.

old knife, inscribed with the owner’s name; and this might settle question of ownership, but not a question of identity.  I protest against the old name being fastened to the new system, for it is in this case a delusion both as to ownership & identity; so at least it appears to me.

            But admitting for argument’s sake that the rigid system which we propose, is the identical system which we have had and under which we have suffered, and that the only change is in the mode of administering it; the results will be as wholly different as if it were changed; and a man who had no special fancy for the name, & who looks at things rather than at words, would say that it is changed.  Imagine a finger-post pointing due North, and bearing the inscription “20 miles to St. Ives.”  It would be the same finger-post; that is, the wood, and the nails, and the paint, would be the same; but the effect on the mind of the traveler, would be just the opposite of what is was before. 

Our system heretofore, has pointed to irregularity, disorder, and “confusion”; under the new regime it will point to regularity, order and harmony.

            In this case, there is no wood, and there are no nails and paint to retain identity; the working of the system is the system.  When the working is wholly different, all is wholly different, all is wholly different; there is no material substance, as in the case of a wooden post, to remain the same; the subject matter is purely ideal; and when the ideal is changed, there is nothing left to be changed; all is new.

If a picture could be presented of our Institution as it has been, showing all the facts of its inside life in panorama; and if another picture could be placed beside it, showing it in like

 

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Curriculum & University Systems.

manner, as I think it will be, on the plan now proposed; no man looking at the two pictures, and knowing nothing except what he could see, could ever be made to believe that the two systems are the same.  The difference, would be much like the difference between a seething mob and a regularly organized and well appointed army.  They are not the same.

                        I am sorry that the majority of my esteemed Colleagues cannot see this matter as I do.  I cannot understand why it is that they do not; but I give them the same credit for sincerity and honesty of purpose, which I am sure they accord to me.

I am not quite so much alone however, as I seem.  At least two of my professional brethren agree with me; probably not in all that I have said, but in the general view presented.  They affixed their names to the Report of the majority it is true; but could not be induced to do so, until the following paragraph was inserted, and which may be found on page 8 of said Report, to wit:

(The majority having said that they recognize no change in the system but only in its administration.)  “Those of us who think otherwise, and are inclined to discredit the system, by reason of dissatisfactions which have arisen in its working, are content, now that measures have been adopted by which the evils of which they complain, may be corrected, and satisfaction secured.”

To this paragraph I assent.  Occupying the position they do, they have in these few lines said enough to define themselves, and to show where they stand.  I have felt it my duty to say more; for if there are conflicting views in the Faculty, I am sure gentlemen, that you would be pleased to have them both fairly presented; and the Faculty themselves, while differing with me on some points, desire that I should be heard.

 

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August 1878.

It appears to me furthermore that my views coincide with these of the Honorable Board of Trustees.  I beg you gentlemen of the Committee to refer again to the Resolution of the Board under which you were appointed.

“The subject of a return to the Curriculum system, & the abandonment in whole or in part of what is known as the University system, shall be referred to a select Committee &c.”

Are there not two systems spoken of?  Is not one described as the “Curriculum system”, and the other as the “University system?”  Are not these two systems placed in clear antithesis to each other?  Is it not manifest that the Trustees consider them the opposite of each other?  If the Curriculum system is the same as the University system, then the above Resolution is meaningless and absurd.  It is not to be supposed that the Trustees, have said that which means nothing.  They have drawn a certain distinction and a very wide one; and that is the very distinction on which I insist.

What my Colleagues now unanimously recommend, I heartily agreeing with them, is a system of close Curricula; and the language of the Resolution above quoted shows that in adopting this we shall return to what we once had, but now have not; and in the language of the Resolution again, it will be an “abandonment of the University system.”  Thus the view which I have maintained in my previous argument, is shown to be exactly the view entertained by the Board in passing the Resolution which is the basis of the present action.

This whole investigation has sprung from statements made by me, in the Report which I had the honor to make to the Board of Trustees last August.  Whether I erred then or not; whether I am mistaken now or not; of one thing I shall always be glad, and that is, that I have been the means of setting the present

 

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Curriculum & University Systems.

inquiry on foot.  Whatever the result may be, I shall always feel that I have been faithful in the discharge of duty; and if the result should be as I hope and believe it will be, - the correction of great evils, the inauguration of a great reform, the advancement of the cause of sound learning, and the promotion of the usefulness and glory of the University of Georgia, I shall feel that the effect has been the chef d’oeuvre of my professional life.

                                                            I have the honor to be, gentlemen,

                                                                        Your obedient servant

                                                                                    Henry H. Tucker,

University of Georgia, Feb. 1, 1878.                                         Chancellor.

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                        Mr. Brown in behalf of the Committee on Laws and Discipline submitted the following Statute:

                                                            The Report of the Committee of five appointed at the last meeting of this Board with the amendments proposed by the committee on Laws and Discipline as adopted by this Board be, and the same is hereby enacted as a fundamental Law of this University.

                        The Board then adjourned till 5 o’clock this afternoon.

                                                                                                August 3rd 1878, 5 P. M.

Board met according to adjournment.

                        The Committee on Laws & Discipline reported on the Milledgeville Memorial which had been introduced in person by Samuel Walker, Mayor of the City of Milledgeville & C. P. Crawford, together with a Bill of Legislative action recommending the same; which Report was adopted.

The Memorial and Bill are as follows:

                                                                                                Athens, Ga. Aug. 3rd. 1878.

To the Hon. Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia,

            Gentlemen,

 

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August 1878.

We have been sent by the City of Milledgeville, to ask your cooperation, in the establishment of a Military & Agricultural College, in that once honored borough, through Legislative action.

To that end, we ask that you name a time & mode, (whether orally or in writing) when you will receive communication from us on this subject.

We could briefly remind you, that besides the 250 acres of “Reserves” on and along the River, the State owns, within that City 60 acres of land, embracing the State House Square, the Mansion Lot, the Penitentiary Square, and the Government Square,” upon which nearly a million of dollars have been expended, in the past, and which are unmarketable to any private use, and valueless to the State, except for this purpose.  Our City proposes to add two hundred acres of city lands worth $10,000.00 for an Experimental Farm.

We ask that all this property be vested in your Hon. Body, with power to sell any portion thereof, at your discretion, except the Capital, Mansion, & Farm grounds; that you be required to organize and operate therein a College, embracing Military, Agricultural and Normal Schools, free to the white children of the State, on compliance with regulations; and that the expense of repairs, equipment and annual current maintenance be bourne(sic) by the Treasury of the State.

In view of the enormous sum, annually collected for the Public Schools and of the fact that, with the exception of $8000.00 given to the University of Atlanta, not a dollar is applied to higher or collegiate education - and in view of the peculiar circumstances of this case, we think this solicited annual charge upon the Treasury is too moderate for refusal.

                        Hoping that your concurrence may bring speedy success, in this behalf to, the honor & blessing

 

 

 

 

 

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Milledgeville College.

of the State.

            We are respectfully &c.

                                    Sam Walker, Mayor.

  1. P. Crawford.

 

An Act to establish the Middle Georgia Military & Agricultural College.

By it enacted, &c.

  1. The State House Square and appurtenances, the Executive Mansion & premises, the Penitentiary Square & appurtenances, the Government Square adjacent to the Central R.R. Depot, and any and all other real property of the State of Georgia, situate in the city of Milledgeville are hereby donated to and vested in the Trustees of the University of Georgia, with the powers & for the purposes herein after set out.
  2. Said Trustee of the University of Ga. Shall have power to sell any portion of the above donated property, except the State House & Square, & the Executive Mansion & premises, at their discretion and under such regulations as they may prescribe, and apply the proceeds of sales to the equipment of the College hereinafter provided for.
  3. Said Trustees shall, without needless delay, proceed to organize in the above donated property, a College which shall be styled the Middle Georgia Military & Agricultural College, & shall be a Department of the University of Georgia.
  4. The sum of $        (blank) is hereby appropriated from the Treasury of the State to be drawn by Executive Warrant to be expended by said Trustees in enclosing the old State House Square & otherwise fitting the above donated property for College purposes.
  5. The Governor is hereby required to draw his warrant annually, upon the Treasury of the State for the sum of $            (blank) which sums are hereby appropriated therefor, to be expended by the said Trustees in and for the annual current expenses of main-

 

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August 1878.

-taining said College.

  1. Tuition in said College shall be free to all white males & females, provided a Matriculation and Library fee, not exceeding ten dollars per annum, may be exacted, & grades of scholarship may be prescribed by the Faculty, under direction of the Trustees, as conditions of admission.
  2. The course of instruction in said College in addition to Military training shall be specially directed to Military training shall be specially directed to preperation(sic) (1) for the higher classes at Athens, (2) the business of practical Farm life & (3) for the profession of Teaching & (4) Military.  A certificate of proficiency warranted by the Faculty, shall be sufficient license to teach in the State Schools.
  3. Said Trustees may accept such land within the corporate limits of Milledgeville, not less than two hundred acres, as may be donated by said City, said Trustees to select said land and establish thereon, so soon as practicable, and Experimental Farm, to be operated in connection with the College.

 

 

Messrs. Cobb and Billups were appointed a Committee to invite distinguished strangers to seats on the stage during the public exercises in the Chappel(sic).

                                    Mr. Yancey submitted a resolution in relation to an address to the people of Georgia which his on the table for the present.

                                    Mr. Lewis submitted the printed report of he North Georgia Agricultural College which was read by Mr. Yancey & then referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline.

                                    Mr. Speer moved that the thanks of the Board are due to Lieutenant Joseph

 

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Professorships.

Garrard for gratuitous services in teaching Mathematics in the North Georgia Agricultural College which motion prevailed.

                        The Board then adjourned to Monday at 10 o’clock A. M.

 

                                                                                                August 5th. 1878 10 A. M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

                        The correspondence of the Secretary with Dr. Potter in relation to the subject of the University High School was referred to the Prudential Committee to report thereon during the present sessions of the Board.

                        Mr. Vason moved that the gentlemen from Cuthbert who represent that City in relation to a branch College there, be heard to day upon the reassembling of the Board at the close of the Sophomore Declaration.

                        The Committee on Laws and Discipline was excused from attendance at the Chapel to day and to meet during the abscence (sic) of the Board.

                        The Board then repaired to the Chapel to attend the Sophomore Declamation.

                        The Board returned to the Library after the Declamation and resumed business.

                        Mr. Toombs Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline submitted the following report viz:

                                                The Committee of Laws and Discipline agreed upon the following professorships to carry out the Six Curricula already reported and adopted.

  1. Professorship of Mathematics.
  2. Professorship of Natural Philosophy & Astronomy to include Engineering.
  3. Professorship of Latin and Greek languages and Literature.

 

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August 1878.

  1. Professorship of Chemistry, Agricultural Chemistry, Mineralogy and Natural History & Geology.
  2. Professorship of History, Political Science, and Modern Languages.
  3. Professorship of English Language and Literature and Belles Letters.
  4. Professorship of Logic, Metaphysics, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy(circled).  Political Economy(written in pencil)
  5. Adjunct Professorship of Mathematics, with a salary of $1000.00
  6. A Tutor in Latin and Greek with a salary of $800.00
  7. The Student shall hereafter occupy the Dormitory Buildings and be under proper survillience (sic), under the direction of the Faculty, provided exceptional cases may be disposed of by the Faculty.
  8. The Chancellor shall be ex-officio President of the Georgia State College of Agriculture & the Mechanics Arts, without salary.
  9. The Chancellor shall perform the duties of a Professorship, provided that a salary shall be annexed to the office of Chancellor. - R. Toombs.

Which Report was adopted except the last clause No.12, relating to the Chancellor.

                        The Committee on Laws and Discipline submitted through Mr. Brown their Report in relation to Mr. Lewis and the North Georgia Agricultural College, which was adopted and is as follows:

                        In the matter of the five hundred dollars appropriated by the Board of Trustees to David W. Lewis, President of the North Georgia Agricultural College to assist him in the discharge of his duties and as President Lewis made arrangements with advanced students to assist him on terms satisfactory to them and as he has paid postage to a very considerable amount for the College and incurred other expenses and as he has

 

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Report on Library.

for years thrown open his private library to the use of the students without charge and as the said sum was not appropriated for the use of the Board of Trustees at Dahlonega, but to said Lewis, your Committee are of the opinion that the matter should be considered as settled.

 

Professor W. W. Lumpkin, Professor of English Language and Literature, resigned his professorship for the purpose of relieving the Board from any embarrassment on his account, which resignation was accepted by the Board.

                        The Board then adjourned till 5 o’clock P.M.

                                                            August 5th, 1878. 5. P.M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Gov. Colquitt appeared and took his seat.

Mr. Cobb Chairman of the Committee on the Library submitted his Report, which was amended and is as follows:

Library.

Aug. 1878

Gentlemen-

                        Your committee beg leave to report that under the efficient management of Prof. Browne the library has been greatly improved in its arrangement and neat appearance and valuable additions have been made for which he is entitled to the thanks of the Board.

                        At the time of our last report there was in the hands of President Charbonnier the sum of $121.61 to be expended for reference books.  By his report herewith enclosed you will find an itemized account of the expenditure and a balance due that gentleman of 28 cts.

There is now on hand of the Library fund the sum of $1257.00.

We find that all the departments are well supplied with reference books and do not need as much as heretofore to keep them up.

 

 

 

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August 1878.

1st.  We therefore recommend that $300.00 of this fund be appropriated for that purpose.

2nd.  We recommend that the sum of $30.00 be paid undergraduates Armstrong and Jones for extra services rendered the librarian.

3rd.  That the sum of Seventy five dollars or so much as may be needed, appropriated to binding periodicals on hand and rebinding &c. of damaged books.

4th.  We recommend that the ballance (sic) of the fund be used for the purchase of books of general information by order of the Faculty.

5th.  We recommend that the suggestion of the Librarian in reference to use of the papyograph for making additions for making additions to the catalogue of books be adopted, except that part recommending a purchase of an instrument, as we have two already in the University we think the purchase of another unwise.

6th.  We recommend that the rule prohibiting books from being removed from the library be repealed so far as the students are concerned.

Whilst we believe the present rule a good one for many reasons yet until we have a librarian who shall devote his whole time to that work we believe it impracticable.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

                                                                                    Lamar Cobb, Chairman.

Library.

Gentlemen,

                        In reference to the petition of the students on the subject of the library.

We recommend that the students be allowed to take out any book they desire for one week, with the privilege of renewing at the end of that time.

1st.  That the Librarian be required to report immediately to the Chancellor the failure to return any book or books at the end of the week, and that it shall then be the duty of the Chancellor to require said delinquent to return said book or books or to pay their value.

 

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The Chancellorship.

2nd.  That it shall also be the duty of the Librarian to report immediately to the Chancellor any student who returns any book or books in a damaged or mutilated condition and upon such report being made the Chancellor shall require the student to pay sufficient amount to repair such injury.

3rd.  It shall be the duty of the Librarian to keep the Library open each day (Sundays excepted) from 4 o’clock P. M. until 5 ½ o’clock P. M. and on Saturdays from 2 P. M. until 5 P. M.

 

The Chairman of the Committee on Laws & Discipline called up the 12th item of his Report in relation to the Chancellorship viz:

                                                            “The Chancellor shall perform the duties of a professorship, provided that a salary shall be annexed to the office of Chancellor.”

                                                                                    which was debated and during the discussion Mr. Stephens submitted a substitute and moved its adoption, to which Mr. Brown offered an amendment, which being accepted by Mr. Stephens, the yeas and nays were called for and are as follows, upon a motion to lay the substitute upon the table:

           

The Yeas are Messrs. Miller, Mitchell, Hill, Yancey, Harris, Cobb, Lawton, MacIntyre, Pierce, Crawford, Billups, Colquitt, Thomas, Barrow, Toombs - 15.

Vason, Jackson, Brown, and Stephens are the nays - 4.

 

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August 1878.

The Board then adjourned to 8 ½ o’clock tomorrow morning.

                                                                                    August 6th 1878. 8 ½  A. M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Messrs. John T. Clarke and Arthur Hood in behalf of the citizens of Cuthbert appeared before the Board & submitted the following Memorial, accompanied with an argument in favor of the same, by Judge Clarke which was referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline together with the Resolution offered by Mr. MacIntyre in behalf of the Citizens of Thomasville.

MEMORIAL.

To the Board of Trustees,

of the

University of Georgia.

_____ _____

Gentlemen:

            Your Memorialists herein represent, and act by authority of the citizens of Cuthbert, the Board of Trustees of the Randolph Male Institute, and the Board of Trustees of the Bethel Female College, both of which institutions are located in said city.  The Common Council of Cuthbert, by ordinance passed July 24th, 1878, have sanctioned the offer herein made as to said Institute, and the citizens without a dissenting voice concur therein.  The Bethel Baptist Association, under whose supervision the Trustees of said College exercise their functions, did, at a session held last November, authorize, the said Trustees to take this step; and said Trustees, by formal vote, on the ___ (blank) day of _______ (blank), made the offer hereinafter communicated.  The two Boards of Trustees last aforesaid, and the said citizens and City Council unite herein to make a joint offer.  The undersigned individuals are appointed by said Boards and Council, with the amplest powers to negotiate with you, to consumate (sic) details, and to put the entire transaction into whatever shape may meet your approval.

The Trustees of said college hold the following property,

 

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Cuthbert College.

Unincumbered(sic), to wit:  Twenty acres of land in a body, about one mile from the Court-house.  Thereon is a superior wooden building, two stories high, containing a large audience room, or chapel, and four rooms on the first floor, and three rooms on the upper floor; which building was elected and has been successfully used for a Female College, and cost eight thousand dollars.  Around the building is an enclosed yard of about three acres.  The remainder of said land is woods.  Beginning about one hundred yards in the rear of the building, are numerous excellent springs, of superior free-stone water, from which, at small expense, water, in great abundance, can be raised in great quantities into the yard and building.  From these springs runs off, entirely through said land, except the yard, a beautiful branch with cleanly banks.  The site of the building is very elevated and beautiful.

                        The Trustees of said Institute hold, unincumbered (sic), a square ten acre lot, in said city, which at the nearest points, is distant not over one hundred and fifty yards from the yard of said Female College.  This lot lies almost perfectly level, and is mostly covered with a fine oak grove.  When it is a handsome new wooden building, costing seven thousand dollars; two stories high, containing besides several halls, five large apartments below, and three above, convenient in size, shape & arrangement, for the purpose of a graded high school for boys.  These two properties we hereby offer to your Board, to be used for the establishment and maintenance of a free Agricultural or Mechanical College, or school, with such funds belonging to the State as you may be able to control for such purpose.  We desire such an Institution to be placed on the same, or a similar footing, with the like enterprise at Dahlonega.  We are prepared to make such disposition of the titles to said property, as you may deem suitable; and while ready to aid your body, if proper, with our views, as to the organization of such an enterprise, we are not disposed to dictate conditions.  We will be in Athens during your proposed meeting in August,

 

(77)

August 1878.

and, by your leave, and at your pleasure, will be glad to appear before your body, to furnish such further information, explanations, or suggestions, as may be called for.

                        We could respectfully submit a few considerations in favor of your acceptance of our offer:

First.  The property offered is adequate to the purpose proposed.  A small expenditure in repairs would make the buildings first-class in convenience & adaptation.

Second.  Cuthbert is in the midst of one of the best agricultural regions in the State.

Third.  It is one of the most beautiful, best-improved and well kept towns, of its size, in Georgia.

Fourth.  Our community; containing about three thousand inhabitants, is characterized by a high degree of intelligence, order, good morals, and, especially, a profound interest in educational enterprises.  We have a Methodist, Baptist and Presbyterian churches.

Fifth.  The people not only of Randolph, but of all Southwest Georgia, are experiencing a deep and thoughtful concern upon the great practical problems connected with the profitable cultivation of the soil, in all forms and varieties; and upon all the facilities for such education as especially fits men for practical and enlightened farmers & Mechanics.

Sixth.  We confidently claim for Cuthbert, advantages of health rarely to be met with in this climate.  We believe, that, throughout the year, it will compare favorably, in this respect, with any town in Georgia.  It is the highest point west of Macon on the Southwestern Railroad, and about sixteen miles north of the pine flats, which are commonly supposed, by the up-country people, to be characteristic of Southwestern Georgia.  The city is upon very dry and elevated land, remarkably exempt from malarial influence.  We have, in abundance, free-stone water, as pure as any, and of a pleasant temperature, only about three and a half

 

(78)

Cuthbert College.

degrees higher than the best well water of Atlanta, Griffin and Newnan.  Our city is in the midst of a somewhat broken country, with oak and hickory timber.

 

 

 

                        Such advantages, had we the school which we desire, would make Cuthbert a favorite resort for students from all the surrounding and the lower counties of the State, and would, doubtless, bring to us numbers of students from Stewart, Chattahoochee and Muscogee, Webster, Marion and other counties as far up as Bibb.

Seventh.  Board can be obtained here at low rates.  A gentleman of experience in teaching, has, for the entire scholastic year just expired, charged only one hundred dollars for board, room rent and tuition; and claims to find such rates satisfactorily profitable.  While we do not present that as the rate of board reliably to be expected hereafter, we believe, that a near approximation thereto may be anticipated.

Eighth.  We would respectfully urge the claims of South western Georgia to share in the public benefits.  The College established by you at Dahlonega is of no avail to us.  It is so far off, that the expense of travelling to and from it, cuts off patronage from all Southern Georgia.  In fact, but few students go there from below Atlanta.  Out of 374, the total attendance from the Spring Term of 1876 to, and including the Spring Term of 1877, only 22 went from Bill county and counties on level with and below that.  That Institution is sectional in its actual benefits.  This is not owing to the indifference of our people to the advantages offered, but to their poverty.  They are so much concerned about the education of their sons for the great responsibilities of life, that they would place them, in large numbers at school in Cuthbert upon the terms which would be offered.  It is not fair, that our section should be excluded from the equal enjoyment of the funds which ought to be administered for the common good of the State.

It cannot be denied, that there is a widespread and

 

(79)

August 1878.

growing feeling in Southwestern Georgia, that this section has not heretofore been duly considered in distributing the honors and benefits of the State Government.  The people of that section are conscious of having had peculiar difficulties to contend with, since the emancipation of the slaves; and that, in the political triumph, which they have so often made over the large black majorities, they have rendered signal service to the cause of good government, and the honor and welfare of the State.  While we assert for them loyalty and patriotism equal to any section, it cannot be unwise to allay jealousy, by admitting them into a fair share of these public advantages.  Such a recognition as we now ask, would be received by the people of our section, with the most grateful consideration.  It would tend strongly to conciliate the sympathy and support of our people, and their representatives in the Legislature, towards all the educational interests and enterprises under the control of the State.

Your memorialists, therefore, beg you honorable body to accept our offer, and proceed to establish upon said properties, an agricultural, or agricultural and mechanical school or college, to be a branch of the State University, and to be conducted under such regulations as you may devise, and favored with suitable allowances of money from the State educational funds under your control.

                                                Respectfully submitted by your fellow citizens,

                                                                                    John T. Clarke,

                                                                                    Arthur Hood.

 

 

 

(80)

Thomasville College.

To the Honorable

                        the Trustees of the University of Ga.

Twelve months ago it was informally proposed by some of the Trustees to establish a Branch School at Thomasville, Georgia.  The Trustees of Fletcher Institute at Thomasville propose & offer that Institute to this Board as you will see by annexed telegram.  It may be that there is …………in the title to this property as it belongs to the Methodist church.  The offered surrender is complete. The citizens of Thomas County will give fifty acres of land and subscribe enough to erect buildings thereon of it shall be determined that a good title cannot be obtained to Fletcherville.  The people of Thomasville did not move in this matter until the suggestion was made that some of our Trustees informally proposed to establish a school at Thomasville.  I think this informal proposition was made because it was thought that Thomas & the surrounding Counties had sent more students here than any other section of the State so far distant from the University.

            Professor O. D. Scott is in charge of the Fletcher Institute and is anxious for this Board to take charge of the Fletcher Institute and to become an educator either as Professor or President of the Branch school.  The school could be opened this Fall by using buildings of Fletcher Institute if title can be perfected.  The location is best for the school as it is eligibly located and the appointments good, two brick houses.

The action taken by the citizens of Thomasville doubtless induced the action at Cuthbert and while I am willing to aid Cuthbert if it can be afforded, yet under the circumstances I feel and think that the location at Thomasville has the preference.

 

(81)

August 1878.

Prof. Scott thinks he could have as large a school there, as the one at Dahlonega and that he would send many scholars to the University, therefore I desire if the Board cannot now organize a School there that a proposition be made by this Board, to the people of Thomas, when I do not fear but that any reasonable proposition will be accepted.

                                                                        Respectfully submitted,

                                                                                                H. T. MacIntyre.

                                                                                    Thomasville, Ga.

To H. T. MacIntyre,

Care Wm. L. Mitchell,

                                                            Trustees Fletcher Institute tender grounds and buildings for Branch School of University for unlimited time.

                                                                                                R. H. Herding

                                                                                                            President.

Resolved, That the Committee on Laws & Discipline be instructed to take into consideration the practicability of establishing a Branch School of Agriculture at Thomasville Georgia, upon the same terms and conditions as the one at Dahlonega.

                        Upon the foregoing Applications of Cuthbert and Thomasville the Committee on Laws and Discipline submitted the following Report drawn by Mr. Vason and amended and adopted and is as follows:

                                                                        The Committee in the Applications from the citizens of Cuthbert & Thomasville to establish in each city a College as set forth in their Memorials, beg leave to report that they think favorably of said applications; that this board will accept the trust proposed and undertake the execution thereof, as soon as the same are chartered by law; and that provision being made by law and authority given

 

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Chancellorship.

this Board will appropriate such an amount as can be spared for the purpose of aiding in the payment of the salaries for the instructors in said Colleges which may be chartered.

 

                        The Board then resumed the consideration of the 12th item of the Report of the Committee on Laws and Discipline heretofore recorded and Messrs. Toombs and Brown were heard upon the subject when the Board repaired to the Chapel to witness the Junior Exhibition of original speeches.

                        Leave was granted the Prudential Committee to remain in Session during said Exhibition to consider the subject of reopening the University High School.

                        At the close of the Junior Exhibition the Board returned to the Library and adjourned to meet this afternoon after the meeting of the Alumni Society at 4 P. M.

                                                                        August 6th. 1878 Afternoon

Board met according to adjournment.

The 12th item of the Report of the Committee on Laws and Discipline heretofore recorded was then adopted by the following vote:

Yeas - Messrs. Mitchell, Miller, Hill, Toombs, Vason, Pierce, Crawford, Billups, Barrow, Thomas, Cobb, Harris, Lawton. - 13

Nays - Messrs. Lewis, Brown, Yancey, Jackson, Stephens, Colquitt. - 6

 

                        Mr. Yancey presented petitions in favor of Secret Societies which were laid on the table,

Mr. Yancey in behalf of the Prudential Committee submitted a Report on the subject of re-opening the University High School.

 

(83)

August 1878.

Mr. Toombs submitted the two following resolutions which were adopted, and are as follows;

                                    1st. Resolved, That the resolution adopted by this Board on the ______ (blank) day of _____(blank) 1876 making the office of Chancellor of this University honorary and without compensation be and the same is hereby repealed, and that in additions to the duties assigned to the Chancellor by the statutes of the University, he shall perform the duties of Professor of Logic, Metaphysics and Moral Philosophy, and that the compensation of the Chancellor performing the duties herein assigned him shall be twenty five hundred dollars per annum.

 

                                    Resolved, That this Board proceed immediately to elect a Chancellor of the University with the duties and Salary herein assigned to the office.

 

                                    Rev. Patrick H. Mell D.D. LL.D. was nominated by Mr. Hall and upon counting out the ballots it appeared that he was duly elected.

                                    Messrs. Yancey, MacIntyre and Vason were appointed a Committee to wait upon Dr. Mell, the Chancellor elect and personally request his acceptance, of the Chancellorship.

                                    On motion of Mr. Stephens the Degrees as recommended in the Chancellor’s Report were conferred on the students therein named.

 

                                    On motion of Mr. Mitchell the Degree of Doctor of Jurisprudence was conferred in course upon

                                                Hamilton Yancey Esqr. of Rome and Davenport Jackson Esqr. of Augusta.  The Board then adjourned to 8 ½ o’clock tonight.

 

(84)

Chancellorship.

                                                                                                August 6th, 1878, 8 ½ P. M.

Board, met according to adjournment.

Mr. Beckwith appeared and took his seat.

                        Mr. Yancey in behalf of the Committee to wait in person on Dr. Mell the Chancellor elect, reported that they had performed that duty and that the announcement of his election, both surprised and embarrassed him and he desired as much time as could be given him to decide so important a question, stating that he had under his charge three churches which he would have to give up if he accepted the office and that it would require a salary of three thousand dollars to support his large family.

 

            On motion of Mr. Hill the Board unanimously decided that Dr. Tucker perform three duties of Chancellor to the end of the Collegiate year and be paid his salary to October the 1st 1878.

            Mr. Brown moved that the consolidation of the two Professorships of History & Political Science and Modern Languages be reconsidered which was carried.

 

                        The Tutorship was on motion reconsidered and abolished.

                        It was made the duty of the Professor of Modern Languages to assist the Professor of Latin & Greek in these Languages.

                        The Board then proceeded to the election of Professors.

 

(85)

August 1878.

L. H. Charbonnier, was elected Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy and Civil Engineering.  H. C. White was elected Professor of Chemistry, Agricultural Chemistry, Geology and Mineralogy.  Eustance W. Speer was elected Professor of English Language & Literature and Belles Letters.

Samuel Barnett Jr. was elected adjunct Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy.

The Professorship of History and Political Science was abolished, & by the following votes reconsidered.

Yeas - Messrs. Mitchell, Hill, Jackson, Pierce, Crawford, Hall, Barrow, Thomas, Beckwith, Harris, Lawton, Colquitt. - 12

Nays - Messrs. Miller, Lewis, Toombs, Yancey, Vason, Cobb, Speer, MacIntyre. - 8.

 

                        The Board then adjourned to 8 ½ o’clock tomorrow morning.

                                                                                                August 7th, 1878. 8 ½  A. M.

The Board met according to adjournment and resumed the subject of the Professorship of History and Political Science, when Mr. Speer submitted the following resolutions:

                        There shall be a chair of Agriculture and Horticulture, Natural History, and Political Science.

                        It shall be the duty of the Professor to teach these Sciences in the spirit and meaning of the act creating the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts and his Salary shall be paid out of the Landscript fund, which wase(sic) adopted.

                        The words Natural History were on motion stricken out of the Professorship filled by Professor White, and were inserted as provided in the above resolution of Mr. Speer.

                        On motion of Mr. Pierce the Board proceeded to the election of a Professor of Agriculture

 

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Chancellorship.

and Horticulture, Natural History and Political Science, and he nominated Gent. Wm. M. Browne, who was duly elected.

                        Mr. Yancey Chairman of the Committee to see the Chancellor elect impressed up on the Board the importance of adding to his salary before calling upon him for his final answer and Mr. Lawton thereupon moved to add five hundred dollars to the Salary, the Chancellor paying house rent, making his salary three thousand dollars per annum.

                        Upon this motion the Yeas and Nays were required and are as follows:

Yeas - Messrs. Mitchell, Miller, Lewis, Hill, Toombs, Yancey, Vason, Jackson, Pierce, Crawford, Billups, Hall, Barrow, Thomas, Cobb, Harris, Lawton Mac, Intyre, Speer and Colquitt. - 20.

Nays - Mr. Brown - 1.

 

                        Mr. Yancey Chairman of the Committee to see the Chancellor elect, asked leave for his Committee to be absent for the purpose of having a final interview with Dr. Mell, and soon thereafter returned and reported Dr. Mell’s acceptance of the Chancellorship.

                        The Board then repaired to the Chapel to attend the Commencement Exercises where the Degrees were publicly conferred by Chancellor Tucker according to the resolution of the Board already recorded.

                        The Board then returned to the Library and resumed business.

                        Mr. Stephens moved to reconsider so much of the report on the library as provides to pay the two young men therein named $30.00 which motion prevailed.  He thereupon moved to strike out thirty and insert fifty, which was agreed to.

 

(87)

August 1878.

On motion of Mr. Hill, Mr. Samuel Barnett Jr. was made adjunct Professor of Natural Philosophy as well as adjunct professor of Mathematics.

            Mr. Thomas was added to the Committee on Honorary Degrees.

            Mr. Yancey stated the action of the Alumni Society that the State Agricultural Society be allowed four Trustees to represent it in this Board and after full discussion they decided against the motion upon a call of the Yeas & Nays, viz:

The Yeas are Messrs. Lewis, Yancey, Hall, Barrow and Colquitt - 5.

The Nays are Messrs. Mitchell, Miller, Hill, Brown, Toombs, Jackson, Pierce, Thomas, Beckwith, Cobb, Harris, Lawton, MacIntyre and Stephens - 14.

                        Upon the request of Mr. Thomas the board granted to the State Agricultural Society the use of the College Chapel and the rooms of the lower floor of the Library building during its sessions here next week.

                        The Board then adjourned to 5 o’clock this afternoon.

                                                                                                August 7th, 1878, 5 P.M.

The Board met according to adjournment.  Mr. Toombs Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline, made divers(sic) verbal reports all of which were agreed to and are as follows:

1st.  That fifty dollars be paid to Rev. Mr. Branch of Savannah who preached the Commencement Sermon.

2nd.  The Prudential Committee were instructed to get a supply of water for the use of the famalies(sic) and students connected with the Institution.

3rd.  The Same Committee were instructed to improved the Campus & put the buildings in proper order.

 

(88)

Josiah Meigs’ Portrait.

4th.  The thanks of the Board were voted to Mrs. Catharine Gresham for the portrait of Josiah Meigs, the first president of the University of Georgia, with a present of one hundred dollars, and also to Rev. John Jones D.D. for the interest he took in procuring the portrait, and that his letter be spread on the minutes.

The following is the letter referred to, viz:

 

                                                                                    104 McDonough St.

                                                                                                Atlanta, May 30th, 1878.

Col. W. L. Mitchell,

                        Respected Friend,

                                                I visited Green Co. last week; and according to your request, called on Mrs. Catharine Gresham, and obtained from Her, the following statements in reference to the picture (the same presented by her to the University of Ga.) of President Josiah Meigs.  Said Portrait was painted at the instance of Mr. Josiah Meigs, for Mrs. Gresham then Miss Catharine Wingard.

It was painted in Washington wity by a Miss King of Washington.  It was painted in 1824 about one year before (Mrs. Gresham thinks) the death of Mr. Meigs.  Mrs. Gresham as Miss Wingard seems to have been entimately(sic) acquainted with Mr. Meigs and family, and her husband certainly was a favorite of Mr. Meigs, as will appear from the following facts.

Mr. Sterling Gresham at the age of 19, with Mr. Meigs went to Sandusky Ohio, in Government service.  Then to Washington City, and was for years a clerk under Mr. Meigs Commissioner of the Land office of the U. S.  Mr. Gresham married two sisters named Wingard.

Mrs. Gresham thinks President Meigs may have been born on the Island of Bermuda, as he once lived there, and taught school.

 

 

 

(89)

August 1878.

Mr. Meigs came to Connecticut, and was once a Professor or Tutor in Yale College.  He married Clara Benjamin of Connecticut.  They had four Sons:

Charles, who became a distinguished Dr. and Professor of Medicine in Philadelphia; Henry, who became a Layer in N. Y. City; Ezra Stiles (no doubt named after a distinguished president of Yale College) and John Benjamin Meigs.

Their only Daughter named after her mother Clara, was married to John Forsyth of Ga., one of our most talented and distinguished men.

Mrs. Gresham says Dr. Josiah Meigs, was remarkable for loveliness, and amiability in his family, Courtesy, intelligence, and unfeigned consistent piety.  Greatly respected and loved in life, and in death deeply, tenderly mourned and lamented!  His death was a public Calamity, and to his family and his clerks an irreparable loss.

                        The Benjamin family were all Presbyterians, and Mr. Meigs, in all probability through their influence, became a Presbyterian, and was a ruling Elder (I think) at the time of his death.

                        Thus far had I written when I left for my appointment in Madison from which place, I returned on the 3rd, of June last Monday.

                        One more fact gathered from Mrs. Gresham, informed me that, Return Jonathan Meigs, distinguished for his name, and for many years service for the U. S. Government, was a Nephew of President Josiah Meigs..and the history and origin of Jonathan’s peculiar name.  I learned from Revd. Dr. Pratt of Roswell Cobb Co. Ga. Originally of Connecticut. It is as follows:  A Mr. Jonathan Meigs offered his hand in marriage to a certain New England damsel.  She apparently, declined the offer.  He believing her in earnest, bowed and retired, and retreated sadly through the yard, and was in the act of emerging from the premises; &

 

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Dormitory System.

when the voice of his Lady love arrested him, with these hope inspiring words, “Return Jonathan!”  He quickly returned, renewed his suit and was accepted.  Then marriage! and then a man-child, whom in commemoration of the happy recall, they named, Return Jonathan Meigs.

But, you will be saying a truce to the Meigs family!  Allow me to wish that you could have witnessed the earnest affectionate memorial tributes of Mrs. Gresham, to her old friend whose earthly pilgrimage has been closed for more than half a century.  Now generously she resigned the Portrait at my earnest intercession for the University, believing no doubt that the honored name and face would be more sacredly cherished in Athens, than in any other place on earth.

Adieu!  Friend and Instructor of my early youth!  I wish I could meet you at least once a year! Very truly and respectfully Yours

                                                                                                John Jones.

P. S. My kindest regards to all of the members of your family.  I had the pleasure of seeing one of your daughter two months since on the R. R.

 

                        Mr. Toombs submitted the following resolution which was adopted.

                                                            Resolved, That in resuming the Dormitory system the house on Lumpkin St. built to furnish cheap board by being occupied rent free be and the same is hereby appropriated for that purpose, as soon as the rent thereof expires and a suitable occupant can be obtained and that the Prudential Committee be charged with this matter.

 

(91)

August 1878.

The Committee on Laws and Discipline through Mr. Pierce recommend the appropriation of thirty five hundred dollars to the North Georgia Agricultural College to be paid to its President and Professors as heretofore, and moved its adoption which was agree(sic) to.

 

                        Mr. Thomas Chairman of the Committee on finance moved to take up his report which on his motion was adopted, except so much as related to the extra pay to Messrs. Charbonnier and White which on motion of Mr. Brown was refused.

                        The report is as follows:

                                                            The following Report is submitted by the undersigned, in behalf of the Finance Committee.

                        The auditing Committee of the Board have made the customary examination of the Treasurer’s Account for the past fiscal year, from which it appears that the Receipts from all sources were $33,862.61 & the disbursements, including purchases of Apparatus were $38,206.98 for which proper vouchers were exhibited, with a cash ballance(sic) in the hands of the Treasurer of $9,686.79 which an unexpended ballance(sic) of $4,938.92 belonging to the Apparatus Fund, leaving after deducting these two amounts, available for current expenses $3540.37 of which $2757.31 belongs to the Land Script Fund and the remainder $783.06 to the General Fund.

                        The disbursements on account of the State College of Agriculture & the Mechanic Arts were $18,561.79 from which after deducting the income of the Endowment Fund and Sales of Farm products, it will be seen that there was an excess of expenditures over the income in this Department of $504.95

                        The income of the Academical(sic) Department

 

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Report of Finance Committee.

including Library Fees, was $15, 808.77 and the expenditures were $15, 368.77 and the expenditures were $15,368.04 showing an excess of income in this department over expenditures of $437.73.

            The expenditures on account of purchases of Apparatus were $4277.15, for which an itemized statement was submitted by the President of the State College, leaving an unexpended balance on the hands of the Treasurer, belonging to this Fund, as before stated of $4,938.92

                        From the foregoing Statements it appears, leaving out the transactions on account of the Apparatus Fund, that the total disbursements were $67.22 in excess of the total receipts and including refunded tuition $990.70 less than the appropriations, which is deemed a satisfactory result in view of the large diminution of Tuition Fees, which amounted to only $3121.34 net, having fallen below the estimates by the sum of $1878.66.

            The Committee submits the following statement of the Assets of the University which were carefully examined by the Auditing Committee, and which through the Finance Committee                (space) beg leave to report that they found the several amounts to agree with the statements of said assets as hereinafter set forth, that the rates of interest accruing upon the several classes of Bonds is correctly stated, and as the result of their examination it satisfactorily appears that all the interest due to, and collected for the University so far as is embraced in the statements herewith submitted has been collected and accounted for by the Treasurer.             Assets of the University.

I.                                                          Land Script Fund:

Bonds of State of Ga. 8% April & Oct._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $96,000.00

    “       “     “     “    “  7% Jany. & July _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  56,000.00

In hands of the Governor, paying 7% _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  90,202.17

                                                                                          $242,202.17

 

(93)

         August 1878.

  1. Terrell Endowment.

Bonds of State of Ga. 7% Jany. & July _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$16,000.00

    “       “  Ga. R. R. & B’k’g Co. 7% _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 4,000.00

                                                                                            $20,000.00

 

  1. General Funds.

Dept. of State of Ga. Paying 8% April _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$100,000.00

Bonds of State of Ga. 8% _ April & Oct.  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 3,000.00

   “        “  Ga. R. R. & B’k’g Co. Jany. & July 7% _ _ _ _ _  5,000.00

Bond of Clarke County                  “       “    “   7% _ _ _ _ _ _  500.00

Bonds of City of Athens                “       “    “   8% _ _ _ _ _ _ _200.00

                                                                                           $108,700.00

 

As the future of the University depends upon so many contingencies, the Committee in the further discharge of the duty assigned them, to submit estimates of receipts and expenditures for the next Collegiate Year, are somewhat embarrassed in making an estimate of revenue from Tuition Fees on the one hand, as well as of expenditures on the other, in view of the probable legislation of the Board, as indicated at its last Session.

Upon the presumption however, that the Tuition Fees will not fall below the receipts of the past year & the chair of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy will be filled, & the Appropriation to the North Georgia College will not exceed the usual appropriation of $2500.00 under the organization of the University as at present existing, the following estimates are submitted.

 

(94)

Report of Finance Committee.

Income.

Cash Annual Payment by the State _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $8000.00

Interest on General Fund on Bonds _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 641.00

From sale of Farm Products _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 150.00

   “     Rents of Professors Houses _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  1800.00

   “     Room Rents of Students _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  60.00

   “     Library Fees _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 500.00

   “     Terrell Endowments _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  1400.00

 

 

   “     Land Script Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 7914.14

   “     Tuition Fees _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   3120.00

                                                                                            $33585.14

Expenditures

Catalogue _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $300.00

Advertising & Printing _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 400.00

Music _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 120.00

Servants _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _600.00

Postage _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  175.00

Stationary _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 100.00

Insurance _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  200.00

Fuel _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 175.00

Medals _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  20.00

Chemicals _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 100.00

Repairs _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1500.00

Incidentals _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 300.00

Salaries _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  22750.00

                                                                                              $26740.00

 

The proportion of the foregoing estimates to be charged to the Land Script Fund, may be stated as follows:

 

Proportion of Land Script Fund.

Salaries _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$15,000.00

Catalogue _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _150.00

Advertising & Printing _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _200.00

Music _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  60.00

Servants _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _400.00

Postage _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _87.50

                                                                                             $15,897.50

 

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August 1878.

Brought forward _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$15,897.50

Stationery _  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _50.00

Fuel _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 87.50

Chemicals _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _50.00

Incidentals _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 150.00

                                                                                             $16,235.00

            If the above estimate of expenditures to be charged to the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, be deducted from the estimate of total expenditures, it will be seen that the ballance (sic) to be charged to the Academical (sic) Department, will under the present organization (if the Chair of Nat. Philosophy & Astronomy be filled) exceed the estimated income of that department by the sum of $2350.67.  Your Committee therefore earnestly recommend such retrenchment as will reduce the expenditures within the income of that department.

The Committee recommend that the Annual appropriation of $100.00 for a College Post Master be discontinued as unnecessary and that all purchases on account of Stationery & Postage hereafter be made by the Secretary of the Faculty who shall be held responsible for its proper use and distribution.

In conclusion the Committee beg leave to state, that at the last meeting of the Board, the duties of the vacant chair of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy were assigned to Profs. Charbonnier and White, in addition to the duties of their respective chairs, for which extra service, notwithstanding the duties were assigned without additional compensation some substantial recognition should in the opinion of your Committee be made.  It is therefore recommended

 

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Report on Buildings.

that the sum of $350.00 be paid out of the Cash balance (sic) belonging to the Academical(sic) Department, to each of these meritorious officers.

                                                                                    Respectfully Submitted

Athens, Ga.                                                                              S. Thomas

            August 1st 1878.                                                                       Chairman

 

                        Mr. Thomas submitted the following resolution which was adopted.

                                                Resolved, That so much of the estimates of the Finance Committee relates to the several items of miscellaneous expenditures for the next Collegiate year is approved and specific appropriations are hereby made in accordance with said estimates as also for the several departments of both Franklin & State Colleges in accordance with the legislation of the present session of the Board.  Librarian’s fee of $100.00 to be paid out of Library Fund.  On motion of Mr. Cobb the Board referred the petition of students to have secret societies to the Faculty with power to act.

                        The Board ordered the salary of Professor Charbonnier to be paid equally from the Land Script Fund and the General Fund.

                        Mr. Harris Chairman of the Committee on buildings moved to take up his report which was adopted, and is as follows:

                                                                                    To the Board of Trustees,

                                                                                                            The Committee on Buildings report, that the principal repairs on the buildings within the University Campus for the past year have been recovering Prof. Waddel’s dwelling renewing fences on lots occupied by Dr. Billups & Prof. Wilcox.  Plastering & White washing inside the building known as New college mending old and furnishing new blinds for west end of old college, work on Campus fence & Gates and fitting up a room for Prof. Brown, his old room having been occupied by Prof. Little.  The aggregate cost of these repairs has been $863.18.

 

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August 1878.

The condition of the property known as the University High School was fully made known to the board at its last session.  The roof was wholly insufficient to protect the building.  It was impracticable to repair it and the only alternative was to cover anew.  This has been done with Fin, the gutters and pipes renewed and the broken sash and lights replaced, so that the building is now perfectly weather tight. The entire cost of refitting the exterior of this building has been $733.40.  Add to this $863.18 the cost of work done on Campus and the buildings therein, and you have $1596.58 as the total amount expended in repairs for the year just ended.

The interior of the High School Edifice remains as it was at your last session.  Should this property ever again be fully occupied, it will be necessary to make large and extensive repairs.  Besides wood work on Piazzas and steps, considerable Plastering, thorough white-washing & painting would be needed, involving in the whole a cost of not less than six hundred and fifty Dollars.

The outbuildings on the place are in fair order.

                        Pursuant to an order of the Board at its last Session, this property has been advertised for sale, but no bids, or propositions, have been received.

The fine building and grounds attached, known as the President’s Lot, is in general bad condition.  This place is rented to Dr. E. S. Lyndon for a stipulated sum, upon condition that he is to make, without charge to the University such repairs as may be necessary during his occupancy of it.  It is very unfortunate that this property is not occupied as originally designed by the Head of this Institution; as while it has to be rented to outsiders and used for a Boarding house it will be impossible to prevent its abuse, and deterioration.

Whenever it shall again be occupied as first

 

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Report on Buildings.

intended it will require not less than six or eight hundred Dollars to put the place in proper order.

            At a former meeting of the Board, the West end of old college was taken from under the charge of the family occupying the building and thrown open for students who might wish to room there and take their meals elsewhere.  Only two of the rooms have been thus occupied.  Under the circumstances it has been found impossible to protect that end of the building.  Being open with no one living in it, or specially responsible for it, it has suffered very considerable damage.  It would now require $100.00 go put it in good order.

It is respectfully recommended that this end of the building be put back under the charge of the occupant of the other part of it.

The east end of the building has been in possession of P. G. Thompson Esqr. since the last meeting of the Board, under contract to furnish board to students at $12.50/100 per month in consideration of having the use of necessary family apartments free of charge.

Not a single student has availed himself of this privilege during the past year.  The contract with Mr. Thompson expires with this session of the Board.  It is not intended to renew it.

In Dec. last several members of the Board resident here, were addressed by a Committee of the Demosthenian Society representing that their Hall was in such a state of decay as to expose their library and furniture to great damage, that their membership was small and their means so limited as to scarcely enable them to defray current expenses and that they had made repeated efforts to obtain funds for making repairs, without any success.

They further state that they have been informed that the property was their own and it was therefore not incumbent upon the Trustees of the University to aid

 

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August 1878.

them in keeping it in repair, which if true they say would necessitate the mortgaging of their Hall to raise the necessary means, and this would probably be the destruction of the Society.

The Phi Kappa Society it is understood is in much the same condition pecuniarily(sic).  It might be well for the Board to define the status of these Society Halls and the relative rights of the students and the Trustees, to control them.

For the ensueing(sic) year repairs will be needed on Roof and boxing of Library building, Roof of Chapel, Furniture for Professor’s Rooms, Plastering & white washing of both the old & new college buildings, the erection of gates, and the usual incidentals, which will require about $1500.00

The grading on Western division of Campus has not been done for want of funds.

Whenever the means at command will allow it, five or eight hundred dollars might be well expended in the improvement of these grounds & the Fencing inclosing them.

                                                                                    Respectfully Submitted,

                                                                                                Young L. G. Harris,

                                                                                                            Chairman.

 

            Mr. Harris submitted the following resolution which was adopted.

                        “In the event that the University High School Property should be occupied according to the action of the Board

                                    It is ordered that the Prudential Committee have the necessary repairs made thereon.”

 

            Mr. Yancey in behalf of the Prudential Committee submitted the following report which was adopted and is as follows:

            The Prudential Committee to whom was referred the letters of the Revd. Mr. Potter, A. M.

 

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University High School.

Teacher in Kentucky in reference to taking charge of the University High School and the subject of reopening that school beg leave to report the following resolutions:

                        Resolved, That the University High School be reopened as soon as practicable upon the following conditions,

1st.  That beyond putting the building in a tenantable condition there shall be no expense devolved upon the treasury of the University.

2nd.  That the buildings with the furniture thereof with five acres of land be rented free, to some suitable educator who shall conduct the school on his own pecuniary responsibility - the Curricula of studies being adjusted to the Curricula of the University - under the direction of the Board of Trustees to prepair (sic) his students for the Junior Classes of the University: Provided that the Principal selected shall pay annually into the treasury of the University the sum of two hundred & fifty dollars to be expended on repairs under the direction of the Committee on buildings

3rd.  The Principal shall be removable for cause at the discretion of the Board of Trustees.

4th.  That advertisement of this proposition be made for 30 days in newspapers published in Louisville, Ky.  Richmond, Va.  Columbia South Carolina, Atlanta, Ga.  Montgomery, Ala.

5th.  That the selection of Principal be made by the Prudential Committee on the 16th day of September proximo.

6th.  That the lease of said property be for the term of three years unless terminated by removal of the Principal.

                                                                                    Wm. L. Mitchell,

                                                                                                Chairman.

 

 

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August 1878.

Mr. Harris submitted the following resolution which was adopted and is as follows:

                        Ordered,  That the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars be appropriated for the necessary repairs upon the Hall of the Demosthenian Society and a like sum for the Phi Kappa Society, each to be expended from time to time as may be required under the direction of the building Committee of the Board.

 

Mr. Harris renewed the resignation of Mr. Thomas as Trustee which on this motion was accepted.

            The Board then went into an election to fill the vacancy thus created.

            Upon counting the ballots it appeared that Mr. Alder Johnson was duly elected Trustee.

 

The President pro-tem then appointed the Standing Committee as follows:

                                    To visit North Georgia College of Agriculture.

                                    Messrs. Cobb, Billups and Beckwith.

 

Committee on Finance.

Messrs. Yancey, Brown, Crawford, MacIntyre and Lawton.

 

Committee on Library.

Messrs. Cobb, Hall, Davenport Jackson, Pierce, and Stephens.

 

Committee on Buildings.

Messrs. Harris, Seward, Vason, Barrow and Mitchell.

 

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Standing Committees.

 

Committee on Law Department.

Messrs. Cobb, J. Jackson Lawton, Toombs, Mac.Intyre and Gordon.

 

Committee on Agriculture & Horticulture

Messrs. Yancey, Lewis, Barrow, & Screven.

 

Committee on Apparatus.

The Members of the Prudential Committee.

 

                        The Board then adjourned sine die.

 

Wm. L. Mitchell                                               Signed by Order of the Board

            Secretary.                                                         Mark(?) A.(?) Carofier(?)

                                                                                                Vin(?) Prudta(?)

 

 

 

 

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University of Georgia.

Athens, August 1st. 1879.

The Trustees of the University of Georgia, met in stated Annual Session in the College Library at 10 o’clock A. M. and were called to order by the Senior Trustee present in the absence of the President and Vice President.

The meeting was opened with prayer by the Chancellor, Rev. P. H. Mell D.D. LL.D.  Upon calling the roll the following members answered to their names, viz:

Mitchell, Lewis, Yancey, Vason, James Jackson, Crawford, Hall, Barrow, Cobb, Harris, MacIntyre, Stephens, Speer and Davenport Jackson, and during the Session the following members appeared and took their seats; Gresham, Brown, Toombs, Gordon, Screven, Lawton, Cooper and Miller.

Escuses (sic) were made and sustained for the absence of the following members; Messrs. Pierce, Smith, Beckwith, Jenkens and Hammond.

The Minutes of the last Meeting were read and confirmed.  Mr. Lewis took the chair and on motion Messrs. Speer and Yancey were appointed a Committee to invite Representatives of the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega, a Branch College of this Institution and of the Contemplated Branch Colleges, at Cuthbert and Thomasville to appear before the Board and hear the Annual Communication of the Chancellor after which an opportunity would be given them to be heard in behalf of their respective Institutions.

The Chancellor read his Annual Communication which is as follows.

                                                                                    University of Georgia.

                                                                                                August 1st. 1879

To the Board of Trustees

            University of Georgia.

                                    Gentlemen

                                                            I have the honor to present to you this my first Annual Report:

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

Number of Students.

During the Collegiate year now closing, one hundred and forty nine (149.) students have matriculated in the Departments at Athens, viz:  in Franklin College, eighty eight, (88.); in the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, fifty five (55.); and in the Law School six (6.)  But in this enumeration one is counted twice as he successfully attended to the A. B. course in the Senior Class and mastered all the requirements of the Law Department.  Taking care therefore not to count him twice in the recapitulation and adding reports from other Departments we have as the number of students in the University.

In Franklin College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _88

 “ State College Ag. and M. A. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _55

 “ The Law Department _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 7

Total in the Departments at Athens _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _149

In the Department at Dahlonega _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  323

In the Medical Department at Augusta _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _77

Total in all Departments _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  549

 

                        From this it will be seen that there has been a gain this year in the Departments at Athens of thirty three (33); and in all the Departments an aggregate gain of seventy nine (79.)

 

Method of Discipline.

Your honorable Body adopted at its last session, regulations in the following words:  “The students shall hereafter occupy the Dormitory Buildings, and be under proper surveillance under the director of the Faculty provided exceptional cases may be disposed of by the Faculty.”

Resolved, That in resuming the Dormitory system, the house on Lumpkin street, built to furnish cheap board by being occupied rent free, be, and the same is hereby appropriated for that purpose as soon as the rent thereof expires, and a suitable occupant can be obtained can that the Prudential Committee be charged with this matter.”

 

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August 1879.

The Prudential Committee agreed with me that it was impossible to carry into effect this legislation,

  1. Because the Board reconsidered its action providing for the election of two young men as Adjunct Professors or Tutors who could room in the Dormitories and keep order at night - finally retaining only one; and (2) Because the house on Lumpkin Street was occupied by a tenant whose lease would not expire until the end of the calendar year, and it would not have been wise, if possible to have attempted to inaugurate such a system in the middle of the Collegiate year, violating the implied agreement with the students that they were at liberty within certain prescribed limits, to make their own arrangements of Board and Lodging; and disquieting and perhaps pecuniarily (sic) injuring the keeper of the College Boarding House, by compelling him to remove from a house in which he could lodge a large number of students into one in which he could accommodate but a few, and it would by no means follow that his boarders would accompany him to a new place of residence.

It seemed to the Prudential Committee then, and to me, that we were under the necessity for the present Collegiate year to adhere to the old system.  Should the Trustees desire again to inaugurate the surveillance and Dormitory system, I respectfully direct their attention to the necessity of arranging all the essential details of such system.  Should the Board still adhere to this plan, I will to the best of my ability, and in good faith, endeavor to carry it out.  Candor however, require me to say that it is not the system which I would from choice adopt and administer.

The design of every wise plan of College Government is to secure as results

  1. Orderly Deportment in the students.
  2. Protection to their Morals.
  3. Diligence and Proficiency in study and
  4. Cultivation of their manners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

Does the Dormitory System, tend to aid in the attainment of these results?

In my opinion it tends to stimulate to disorder rather than to repress or prevent it, because,

1st.  It brings large numbers together of the same class of people and of about the same age, with no infusion of counteracting and conservative elements.  In Normal society, class modifies class:  the two sexes place each other reciprocally on their good behavior and different ages and occupations and modes of thought, and habits of life, and interests, and plans, infringe (crossed out and replaced with impinge in pencil) upon each other and constitute potent factors in working out the problem of individual and public character and conduct.  But in crowded Dormitory buildings the idiosyncrasies of student character would find nothing to counteract them, but every thing to stimulate and invigorate them; and the vicious and disorderly would find the materials to operate on, gathered together within their reach and prepared for their manipulations by the very genius of the aggregation.

2nd.  Again, the system tends, in my opinion to stimulate disorder, because it is avowedly repressive.  It virtually announces to the students that the authorities have and can have, no confidence in them; and that it is their intention to govern them by vigilance and espionage and the arts of the detective chiefly if not alone.

The issue tendered is, of course, accepted by the students, and to normal state between Teachers and Pupils is that of antagonism.  The students on their part cordially reciprocate the implied expression of confidence withheld .  No social relations exist between them and the Faculty. Indeed, for one of their number to cultivate terms of intimacy with any member of the Faculty is to lose cast with his fellows and to be treated by them as one who has treasonably gone over to the enemy.  With war virtually declared and lines of battle virtually drawn - with nine men on one side pledged to enforce order and one hundred and forty nine one the other, tempted to resist and thwart

 

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August 1879.

such irritating and unnecessary use of force; the natural result ought not to be doubtful.  Vigilance will be met by vigilance; and one hundred and forty nine young men can, to say the least, be just as vigilant, adroit and untiring as nine old men.  Blows inflicted by one side will be certain to provoke and secure the return of characteristic blows of the other.  A successful raid now by the governing power will be perpetuated, at unexpected times, and in unexpected places, annoyances public and private, that college-boy genius stimulated by the quasi state of war, is competent to invent and execute.  “College smiles”, tin-pan serenades and pistol fusilades (sic) make night hideous; while gates and fences, and vehicles, and merchants’ signs mark the ravages of war.  On the other hand, an unsuccessful raid to make a reconnoisance (sic), to abate a nuisance, or to capture a prisoner, provokes merriment, & fun reinforcing resentment, intensifies the difficult and multiplies the disorder.  Temptations will be plied to induce the officer to make the abortive effort over again; and numberless baits will be thrown out and ingenious expedients offered to entice to impracticable enterprises.  The result will be if the officer makes no effort at all he will be an object of contempt - if he makes what must inevitably be abortive attempts, he becomes the butt of ridicule.

3rd.  The objections to the system already mentioned are greatly enhanced by the fact that those who administer it at the most difficult and dangerous times are young and usually inexperienced men - earnest perhaps, but in discreet who provoke more disorder than they prevent or suppress.

In a system so favorable to chronic disorder, moral character must be jeopardized and studiousness in a degree sacrificed.

In this connection however let me make an admission and assert a principle as well.  The ordinary noises

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

in a large Dormitory filled with students furnish a condition of things favorable to efficient mental development and practical attainment in knowledge.  This is a noisy world; and the educated man who is not trained to control his attention and pursue lines of thought in the midst of confusion and tumult, to say the least, is not fit to be a leader of men.  Orderly noises then in a College Dormitory - such as the slamming of doors; the moving of chairs; the falling of books; the sound of foot-falls; and the subdued hum of voices - are not unmixed evils, but may subserve a valuable purpose towards culture and training in habits of self-control.  Consequently there is some compensation, for advantages lost, if, the students occupy the College buildings, not as dormitories controlled by surveillance, but as students’ homes governed by the power of influence exerted not only by the Faculty, but by refined and virtuous families placed in authority there.

But chronic conflicts and disorderly noises compromise directly, or indirectly, every occupant of the dormitories under surveillance, and furnish a state of things not at all favorable to studiousness and mental progress.  Those engaged in the disorders for the time being, neglect their books; and those not actively compromised have their curiosity excited so that they watch the progress of the riot or the fun, and wait to see what will be the issue of the disorder.

While correct deportment among the students, their morals and proper habits of study will not be promoted by the Dormitory system; their manners in my opinion would suffer the herding of either sex by itself, away from the refining influences of home and the correcting influences of the other sex.

But we have not here the means and appliances for an efficient enforcement of the Dormitory plan.  The system in this country- where it was not adopted from necessity because localities did not furnish

 

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August 1879.

lodging facilities for students - was copied from the monastic institutions of Europe.  There the buildings are so constructed as to make it possible for the authorities to carry on espionage and surveillance with some efficiency.  The group of buildings pertaining to each college is surrounded by a high wall not easily scaled.  At a certain hour of the night, according to the regulations, the great gate of this wall is locked.  After that time, the officer can go his rounds and have some hope that all he finds in the cloisters are prisoners for the night; and he can have the grim consolation of knowing that all disorders perpetuated afterwards will perhaps be monopolized by the college community and not advertised abroad.

But here the machinery is not provided by which to enforce the system.  When, as he goes his rounds at night, the officer’s back is turned upon the doors of the students’ rooms, all the occupants are virtually at liberty, if so disposed, to go where forbidden pleasure or mischief leads them.

But if the system were free from the objections I have cited, it would be difficult - perhaps impossible - for us to administer it successfully; because all the Colleges in this country, so far as I know, have abandoned it, and public opinion is against it.  I have reason to know that we lost some students because it was reported that the system would go into operation last October.  Certain it is I had many communications from parents informing me that they could not send or return their sons here, if they were forced to lodge in the College Dormitories.  But I may be asked, shall all college government be disbanded and the young men be permitted to do as they please?  Shall college officers be released from all responsibility for the morals and the deportment of the boys - not men in this country - committed to their care?  Better abolish all the institutions in the country rather than

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

that the youth in them for want of restraint should go to ruin.  The question is not whether the University can dispense with college government, but which is the best and most effective form of it.  With great deference and respect I venture to state to your honorable Body, what I consider to be

The true system of College Government.

It is that, in my opinion which relies upon and employs influence chiefly, rather than, authority; which seeks the confidence of the young men and gains their hearts; which inspires them with self respect; and seeks to control them by making them control themselves. 

The system I advocate would avoid antagonisms, and secure kind social relations between Professors and students, by inspiring mutual confidence and respect among all the members of the College community.  It would segregate the students as much as possible by scattering them among the families of the town - subjecting them to the home-like influences of the household, and the conservative influences, daily exercised, of virtuous female society.  Of course, this implies that there is nothing of just authority to be sacrificed, or any thing of College law to be ignored or disregarded, for the College Faculty or officer that permits students with impunity, to trample under foot, college law, or to fail to come up to college requirement, is contemned and despised and cannot possibly be a party to administering the system of influence that controls men, which for that reason is a method of intentional government.  Impotency, and indifference that takes its ease, are in no danger of being mistaken for the thing to which I refer.  But pretension and bluster and ostentations (sic), self-assertion enter in no respect into that influence which controls men.  He is the best manager of men, who while doing it does not seem to do so, but who, a genuine man himself, and unselfish, brings himself and his processes in harmony with human

 

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August 1879.

nature in general, and with the peculiarities of those with whom he has to deal, and then without ostentation, - if possible - without self consciousness, furnish the occasion, and implies the impulse, to men to make them manage themselves, -- according to his notions.

Let the College authorities then gain the hearts of the young men, and command their confidence, and there will be no intentional disorder, by day or by night, single or in combination.  This state of feeling existing, there will be no danger excepting that which may result from personal vices, contracted at the University or brought there from home.  This is a specific danger and difficulty to be met by a specific qualification in the college officer, and by a specific treatment in the administration of college discipline.  The Faculty must make themselves acquainted with the character and habits of every student, and must be able to discover at once the first departure from the path of rectitude.  The student should find himself arraigned immediately after the commission of any vicious act or the performance of any thing tending in that direction; and thus be convinced that he can not proceed in this way with impunity.  No doubt, it is difficult to thus make discoveries, but it is not impossible; and he who finds it so, should not hesitate to conclude that his talents fit him better for any other position than that of administrator of college discipline.  Certain it is, that it is easier to make such discoveries under the system I advocate, than under that against which I am arguing.

When a young man pursues a course so vicious or insubordinate as to make it necessary ultimately to sever his connection with the University, I would if possible subject him to two reformatory processes before the final act:

1st.  When the young man is detected in his first aberration then an opportunity is given to the college

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

Officer to wield a personal influence over him that may tend to reform him and to secure his permanent continuance in the right way.  For college discipline should never be vindictive, or retributive, but simply corrective.  When a parent commits his son to a college officer, the latter should treat the boy, exactly as he would wish another to treat hi own son in like circumstances.  If the young man goes estray (sic), he should be plied with a discipline intended and calculated to correct and reform.  With gentleness and kindness, the boy should be shown his wrong and his danger.  If he gives evidence that he realizes them and promises in satisfactory tone and terms to abandon forever the wrong way, let the officer frankly accept the pledge and promise to keep his secret, divulging it not even to the Faculty, - provided that they have not themselves discovered it, and in that case pledging them also to secrecy.  But let him frankly inform the culprit that the slightest aberation (sic) in the same or a kindred direction will make it necessary for his conduct, with all the incidents and the aggravations of it, to be reported to his parents.

And this brings me to the second reformatory process I would use in college discipline.

2nd.  Should the young man be detected in repeating the offence, or indeed in the perpetration of any disorder, let the officer, gently but firmly, decline to accept any more promises as a reason why he should proceed no further.  Let him with manner at once kind and frank say to the offender that his parents must be informed as to all the facts of the case.  Indeed, it has been, according to my experience, that it is best to read to the young man the letter of information about to be sent to his parents; for the officer would say nothing against the student behind his back.  Now this course will have one of two effects - it will either humble or exasperate; and thus the officer can proceed to subsequent steps intelligently.  If the parent cooperates and the young man is reformed

 

 

 

 

 

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August 1879.

and saved, the officer will have administered college government successfully by enforcing effective, corrective, college discipline.  But in the event that all the processes fail, then the way is opened and the minds of all parties prepared, for the final act.  And it is a great point gained if the college officer has furnished the occasion for the parent of the boy to justify and sustain him in the final and decisive act.

But in the event that all the reformatory methods fail and that the boy be found to be hopelessly vicious or impracticable, even then there is no occasion for passion or resentment; nor any reason why he should be publicly humiliated and disgraced.  Let his parent be requested to withdraw him, or the young man be requested quietly to retire.  Let the officer promise him that he will throw no difficulties in the way of his joining another College, but rather encourage him to do so, assuring him that he will watch his career, with interest, prepared to rejoice at the evidence of his reformation, and success in life.  If College discipline cannot benefit, by all means let it not damage, certainly not ruin, the subjects of it.

Thus far I have spoken only of irregularities and vices.  In cases where students are guilty of notorious crimes, or where their vices or even irregularities have brought public scandal upon them or the University, the treatment would of necessity be different.

I respectfully offer the above as my opinion as to the form the method and the spirit of the true College government.  Nor is my conviction the result of mere theory, destitute of experience.  I have been a college Professor for thirty seven years.  Twenty years of that time I assisted earnestly and honestly in the administration of the Dormitory system, and I will attempt it again if you insist upon it; but it is my honest conviction that the system based upon influence is the only true method

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

of college government and the only one that can approximate to success.

Dormitories.

One of the Dormitories has been used as a College Boarding House, during the current year; and Board, furnished Lodging and Servants’ attentions have been obtained, by such students as desired at thirteen dollars and fifty cents ($13.50) a month.  More than twenty students have boarded there during the whole year.  Mrs. Richardson, the lady of the house furnished a table extraordinarily good for the price, and managed the house-hold with consummate address.  Not the slightest complaint has been made to me during the whole year, by house-Keeper or students; and if there has not been order and mutual satisfaction the fact has not come to my notice.  The other college Building has been partially occupied by students alone.  The young men have deported themselves with great propriety; but it is not desirable that the house should be permanently occupied in this way.  It is never safe for young men to sleep in a house by themselves, away from family influences.  Should the Board not reestablish the surveillance system, I respectfully recommend that this building be placed at the discretion of the Prudential Committee, with power to act according as one or the other of two facts may exist.  Should students in large numbers present themselves here next year, and there be a demand for another cheap Boarding House on the campus, it is desirable that the Committee should have the power in their discretion to repair the building and put a suitable family in it.  Should there be no demand for an additional Boarding house, I respectfully request that the Committee be authorized to close the Building up entirely, as it is now closed in part.

Campus Grounds.

The member of the Prudential Committee have interested

 

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themselves in the improvement of the Campus; and much has been done towards beautifying the grounds.  Especially is the College community indebted in this regard to Col. Y. L. G. Harris of your Board.  Much of his attention and no small share of his valuable time has he devoted to this work.  Under his skill and taste, the western campus has been laid off in artistic style that could not be excelled by the designs of the most artistic Landscape Gardener.  Graceful terraces completed and others indicated, which when finished and ornamented, according to his plan, with turf and tree, and gravelled (sic) walk, will constitute a gem of beauty, - attest his energy and mark his skill.  Mr. R. L. Bloomfield also and Dr. James Camak brought us under obligations by furnishing and planting out, trees on the grounds.  It is much to be desired that the work begun, should be carried on to completion as soon as possible; and that the Eastern campus also should be subjected to the beautifying process.  Nothing could advertise us so favorably to the eye of strangers as beautiful and ornamental grounds - as nothing has disgraced us so much as the neglect and desolation that have reigned here so long.  I cannot with too much emphasis ask the attention of your honorable Body to this important subject.

Library.

On the recommendation of Gen. Wm. Browne, who was just retiring from the office I appointed Undergraduate, J. H. Armstrong, Librarian.  He has performed the duties of the office faithfully and with marked ability.  I beg leave herewith to present his report and to call special attention to the recommendation in the 7th item of it.

Your records showed that Mr. Armstrong’s predecessor had made out a complete list of the

 

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books in the Library, which list you examined and commended; but no such document was on file in the Librarian’s office, and all our efforts to trace it up and to find it have failed.  As it was absolutely necessary that we should have such a list to guide us in the purchase of books, Mr. Armstrong kindly volunteered to make it out.  This he has done with much consumption of labor and of time.  We had no funds which we were authorized to use to compensate for this work; and I respectfully refer the matter to you.

I have endeavored during the past year rigidly to enforce through the Librarian the regulations adopted at your last session.

It was your instruction that a student should be permitted to keep a book out but one week at a time.  I required the Librarian himself to report to me in person on a certain day every week as to whether all parties had observed the regulation and to give me the names of those, if any, who had failed to come up to the requirement.  We received the most prompt and cheerful cooperation of the students; and according to the reports to me, every book taken out during the year has been returned to the Library.

To provide against a possible danger, the Faculty adopted a regulation to govern themselves in the premises.  It is necessary for the Professors to retain permanently in their hands books of reference on the topics pertaining to their departments.  These are in danger of becoming mixed with the books in their private libraries, and in the event of their death, of being lost to the University or of furnishing the occasion for unpleasant issues.  To obviate this danger, the Faculty resolved that every Professor should give to the Librarian in his own handwriting, and under his own signature, the names of all the books of reference

 

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he has taken out and expects to hold.  These lists the Librarian is to copy into his book in the presence of the Chancellor or of the Professor giving the list, & to place the lists themselves carefully and safely on file.  In the event then of the death or resignation of any Professor, all questions that may arise as to the ownership of books may be decided not only by the record, but by the Professor’s acknowledgement in his own hand writing.

But I cannot omit to state to you that notwithstanding all these regulations and precautions your valuable property is continually in jeopardy. 

            1st.  It is absolutely impossible, for the Chancellor burdened with other duties, to make a minute inspection of all the books in a large Library.  All that he can do is to inspect the records of the Librarian, and require from him frequent reports.  If that officer is incompetent or unfaithful every thing is placed in the chapter of accidents.

2nd.  Again, the books are exposed on unprotected shelves; and all who came into the room have unobstructed access to them.  While the Librarian may be in one of the alcoves, the books every where else are exposed to the possible depredations of the thoughtless and unconscientous (sic); for the room is accessible to others besides students, and even servants must sometimes be admitted there to put the room to sights.  To obviate this the Faculty with the concurrence of the Prudential Committee have resolved to apply a protection in the shape of a network of wire under control of lock and key.  Since this was written, the work under the superintendence of Prof. White has been done, and now stands under your inspection. 

3rd.  Another difficulty is that under our present system the Librarian must be an undergraduate.  As a general rule, he cannot hold office more than

 

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A year and before he acquires experience, is succeeded by another in like conditions; so that it is a permanent state of affairs that your valuable and exposed property is managed by those inexperienced & inexpert.  Nor can this difficulty be obviated by appointing a member of the Faculty as Librarian; for every Professor has already as much as he can do. 

It is greatly to be desired that a first class man should be elected by your honorable Body, and I possible paid an adequate salary, as Librarian, whose duty it should be to keep the room open every day in the week, excepting Sunday, and be there in person ready to respond to the calls of members of the University community, and to receive and extend courtesies to all whom it may be your pleasure in any way to admit to the privileges there.  I am firmly convinced that the Library would permanently grow in the number of volumes ore rapidly and surely by appropriating to this purpose a portion of the annual Library Fund, than by expending under the present system, every dollar of it every year in the purchase of books.

State College of Agriculture & the Mechanic Arts.

The number of Students in this college is fifty five (55) as opposed to forty (40) last collegiate year - making a gain of fifteen (15).  The indications are favorable for a larger increase for the next year.

As it has pleased your honorable Body to make the Chancellor of the University ex officio President of this College also, it is no longer necessary to have in form two Faculties with two distinct Record books.  It is proper too that the nomenclature of the State College should be changed in those respects in which it differed from that of the other college in the same University, and under the same Faculty.  Instead of Sections A. and B., the students are graded as Sophomores and Freshmen;

 

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For, excepting in topics peculiar to the State College, they recite the identical lessons under the same officers, & at the same times with those Classes in Franklin College.  The terms then as applied to the students of one college will have the same significance as when applied to those of the other; for the two classes in each are precisely of the same grade.  The two higher classes have been always called Juniors and Seniors.

According to your legislation last year, each College has three curricula terminating with degrees; and each college is competent to impart the highest education in its own sphere.  It is a noteworthy fact though that but few take the degrees of the State College as compared with those who graduate in the A. B. course in Franklin College; and it is discouraging to see the disposition among the students to seek to be transferred from the former to the latter Institution.  But, on reflection, this is not surprising, since in the condition of our civilization and society a greater demand is made for professional than for scientific men.  Indeed some who have already graduated with us as Civil and Mining Engineers have been compelled to give up all hope of a remunerating profession for which their tastes and their training qualify them, because the demand is so limited for services like theirs’.  But it is prepared to meet all the demands of the kind that may be made; and that it has already sent forth a number of first class men who have taken high positions in all the departments of scientific enterprise and achievement.  Indeed we may without hesitation assert that the Georgia State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts is an institution that by its endorsement and equipment has in a sense a superiority over all the old time Bachelor of Arts Colleges.

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Certain it is, as facts have actually shown, those who graduate at those institutions with the highest honors can study profitably in our noble College for years.

The Experimental Farm.

I beg leave with this to present the Report of Gen. Wm. M. Browne, Prof. Of Agriculture, and to respectfully ask to it your special attention.  I cordially invite with him in the request that he be supplied with the instruments for which he applies.  The General has managed the Farm with ability; and has made it an efficient means of communicating practical knowledge to the students who are pursueing (sic) the course for the Bachelor of Agriculture.  It would be gratifying if your honorable Body could furnish him with the pecuniary means to make the farm truly experimental; and a model which all other farms could imitate with profit.  The experiments already made in regard to fertilizers and the modes of cultivation of cotton and the cereals have been in some degree successful and useful; but important as these results may be, they are but small compared to what we should aim at and attain to. 

The farm should not only be an experimental, but a model one.  It should show as the results of scientific experiments all the elements and equipments and enterprises of a perfect farm.  Not only agriculture, but horticulture, and floriculture and fruit culture should receive scientific attention.  Experiments should be made in the matter of stock-raising.  It should be shown how the occupants of the stable and the fold, and the sty are to be selected in reference to breed; and in what proportions, and by what treatment they can be most economically and successfully raised.  The denizens of the barn-yard and of the hive, and even the finny tribe should not be neglected or omitted.  The aviary and the apiary and the fish pond should complete the equipment of the agricultural home-stead.  All these things belong to

 

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a perfect farm; and it should be shown on scientific principles, and in actual practice, that the farm is most successful even pecuniarily (sic), whom they all receive their share of intelligent attention.  After we have secured such results, then, I would have the Professor to give familiar lectures to his Class on the grounds.  He should show his principles and his methods in regard to all these departments, not omitting to give minute instructions in reference to the best structures for housing his animals.  The Agricultural College of Georgia should aim not only to give scientific and practical knowledge to all the youth applying for such instruction, but also to furnish a model farm for Agriculturists all over the State to imitate.

The Faculty.

My Colleagues have as usual faithfully and efficiently attended to the duties of their Chairs, I am happy to give specifically the most unequivocal testimony in reference to the two gentlemen newly elected to office.  Prof. Woodfur has fully sustained the high reputation he gained at another institution; and has proved himself to be an able and successful Professor.  I congratulate the Board on securing the services of so capable and valuable an officer.

Prof. Barrow has proved himself to be earnest, competent and successful. I take pleasure in endorsing as far as I am competent to do so the following communication to me from Prof. Charbonnier;

“Prof. D. C. Barrow, having been appointed to assist me in Applied Mathematics, it is due to him that I should testify to you as to the manner in which he has fulfilled this duty.  It gives me great pleasure to be able to state that Mr. Barrow has given entire satisfaction in the discharge of his duties.  He is not only fully qualified to teach the branches under his charge, but has shown himself full of energy, ready to work at any and all times.  He has been to me a most acceptable & pleasant

 

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assistant, and has won the respect and affectionate regards of the students whom he has taught.”

Apparatus.

Col. Charbonnier who was transferred last year to the Department of Physics, has adorned that Chair, as he has adorned all other positions he has occupied in the University.  When he took charge of the Department last August, he found that none of the State appropriations for Apparatus had been expended, and that there had been no provision made for shelving or taking care of the old-apparatus, on hand.  He at once proceeded to work and during the vacation had the Apparatus room furnished with shelving and fixtures on which to place the Apparatus.  These are all incased in glass, so that every thing may be kept clean and free from dust.  The room now presents a very handsome appearance.  Immediately on his accession to the Chair, the Col. commenced correspondence with the best instrument makers in this country about the purchase of new Apparatus.  In his visit to Europe in 1877 he had obtained from French and English makers all necessary information.  After a good deal of management he was fortunate enough to conclude an arrangement with E. S. Ritchie & Sons of Boston, Mass. to furnish us the greater part of the Apparatus at twenty percent discount on their regular prices.  This arrangement ennabled (sic) him to get the Apparatus on terms as low as it could have been imported from Europe.  Besides E. S. Ritchie & Sons engaged to take the risks of breakage - a very important item in goods of this kind.  Ritchie is one of the best, if not the best makes in this country; and his work is in many respects superior to that of European makers.

Special pieces, manufactured only in Europe, have been ordered from the makers who make them a speciality (sic).  Much of the Apparatus has been received, unpacked, & put away on the shelves.  The remainder is now expected

 

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every week, and we hope will be all in by Commencement.  Apparatus of this kind is generally not kept on hand by the manufacturers, but made only as ordered - hence the delay in getting it all in.  When it is all received the Department of Natural Philosophy will be supplied with a fine set of instruments to illustrate the principles of science.

I cordially unite with Prof. Charbonnier in the request that $50. be appropriated for repairs that may be needed next year, to the Apparatus of the Department of Natural Philosophy.

Of the $15000.00 given by the State for the purchase of Apparatus $36000.00 was appropriated to the Chemical Department of which Prof. White is the able and accomplished head.  The expenditures of this Department have exhausted this portion of the fund, with the exception of a few dollars yet on hand.  The basement and first floor of Moore College have been filled up and furnished suitably for the needs of the Department.  The students Laboratories have been supplied with working tables, gas and water supplies, quick filters, distilling apparatus, vapor closets, balances, reagent bottles, and all other necessaries; every thing provided being of a plain, but substantial character.  An essay room has been provided with complete gas and charcoal furnaces, a gas-blast furnace and all necessaries for metallurgical work.  A special room is devoted to a small steam engine of complete construction, with shafting leading to machines driven by steam power.  H. Natterer’s machine for the liquifaction (sic) of gases is conveniently mounted in a suitable room.  A complete workshop for use of students in making and repairing Apparatus has been provided, stocked with proper tools, a complete foot and power lathe &c.  A small printing press with fonts of type &c. is part of the outfit of the workshop.  The Apparatus, model and store rooms have been fitted with proper casings & shelvings.

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

The Chemical Apparatus is now very complete, and sufficient for all the present needs of the Department in thoroughly illustrating the lectures upon various branches of Chemistry and its applications.  It is so arranged as to be convenient of access and use, and at the same time to be preserved as perfectly as possible.

The models and specimens illustrative of Industrial Chemistry are nearly five thousand (5000) in number, and are very conveniently and systematically arranged.  The walls of the Lecture Room have been decorated with framed diagrams illustrating Theoretical & Industrial Chemistry.  In the arrangement of Apparatus, Models, Specimens and Diagrams an effort has been made to bring these under the observation of the students and at the same time preserve them from handling or abuse.  The pieces of Apparatus, Models, and Specimens are properly numbered and recorded in a book kept for the purpose, entries being made of breakage, repairs, additions, &c.  On the whole it is not too much to say that the Chemical Department though plainly furnished is as well fitted up as the present demands upon it for thorough instruction in its special branches require.  The appropriations now annually made to this Department of $100.00 will be sufficient to supply the chemicals and other materials needed in its conduct.

A Museum.

From time to time, articles of various sorts are sent to the University in the nature of “Curiosities”, illustrations of antiquities &c.  These are sometimes very valuable and should be retained here as the proper place for them.  Many others could no doubt be obtained by proper effort.  At present there is no room suitable for their preservation and display.  A museum should be provided, for articles of this sort.  The third floor of the Library Building, at present partly occupied as a Mineralogical Cabinet, is eminently suited to such a purpose and could be beautifully fitted up at comparatively small expense so as to do duty both

 

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as a Cabinet and a Museum.

Law Department.

I beg leave to present herewith the Report of Dr. Wm. L. Mitchell, the Senior Professor of the Law School and to ask your favorable consideration of his application for an appropriation.  As already noticed, this Department like all the others, has increased in the number of students.  Besides instruction imparted by other officers six young men have enjoyed the high privilege during the year of receiving legal training from the distinguished and venerable gentleman who has so long illustrated this School.

Medical Department.

It was my privilege to attend the Commencement exercises of the Medical College of Georgia and to confer the degree of Doctor of Medicine on twenty one (21) young men.  It is questionable whether we have sufficiently utilized all the advantages growing out of the connection of Departments located in different cities, for the advancement of their individual interests severally and for the success of the University as a whole.  The people of Augusta should be made to feel that it is as much a University town as is Athens.  All the Departments of the University should be, so organized as that there shall be no possible rivalry among them, but that it shall be the interest of every one to promote the interests of all the others.  It is a pertinent question whether the Departments here and the Medical Department in Augusta, have reaped all the advantages that ought to be realized from the union; and it may well be enquired(sic) whether each cannot contribute actively, something towards promoting the interests of the other.  In consulting with members of the Faculty in Augusta we have agreed that something towards this end can be accomplished, if Professors in our Department could deliver lectures on some useful and germain(sic) topics to students in

 

 

 

 

 

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the other.  Such lectures with the notice the newspapers would be likely to take of them would not only advertise favorably both Departments, but stimulate the special friends of each to active cooperation in promoting the interests of both.  Should an arrangement of this kind be made, I respectfully recommend that you authorize the Prudential Committee to contribute your part towards the payment of the travelling expenses, of the Professors.  With the source object in view the Faculty here have invited the members of the Faculty in Augusta to be present at our Commencement & to take a seat on the platform.  We respectfully request you to ratify this invitation.

Department at Dahlonega.

It was not my privilege to attend the closing exercises of this interesting and useful Institution.  Unfortunately these exercises conflict with our Senior Final Examinations.  Besides it is graceful if not necessary for the head of the Faculty to be here to receive & welcome the Board of Visitors, appointed by his Excellency the Governor.  My predecessors felt this latter embarrassment though they were not bound here by the responsibilities pertaining to regular Chairs of instruction.  But in my case, the difficulty was enhanced, because I have on my hands not only responsibilities as Chancellor, but duties also as a Professor.  It devolved on me to preside at some of the Final Examinations, provided for in the Senior Schedule.

But I am free to confess that besides preaching the Commencement sermon, - which any other minister could have done - I know not any part which I could have professionally or legitimately taken in those closing exercises.  I have searched your records in vain to discover any duty or prerogative pertaining to the Chancellor with reference to the Department at Dahlonega.  The “basis of agreement” between your honorable Body and the North Georgia

 

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Agricultural College adopted at your session at Atlanta, Oct. 24th. 1872.  makes no allusion to any duty of the Chancellor.  In this it differs from the agreement with the Medical College of Georgia.

In the latter it is stipulated that the Chancellor should sign the Medical Diplomas.  In no subsequent action is it expressed or indicated in any way that it is your will that the Chancellor shall attend at Dahlonega or do any official act there.  In August 1875, my distinguished predecessor in his report to you used the following words: “Doubtless moreover the School at Dahlonega will in a few years become a valuable feeder to the higher departments of the University:  and I think it would be well to instruct, or at least permit the Chancellor to spend a week or ten days at this School once a year, and to deliver a course of lectures to all the students, inviting the Faculty and the public to attend.”  No record of yours at this session shows that you “instructed” or “permitted” him to do as he asks.  In his report the succeeding year, he says:  “Without instructions from the Board, but presuming on their acquiescence, I spent four or five days in the month of May on a visit to the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega.”  So far as appears from your records, this statement also you receive in profound silence.  Of course, it is clear that the Chancellor was not prohibited by you from visiting Dahlonega; nor rebuked for doing so, and exercising at his discretion any personal & legitimate influence in favor of the Department there; but it is equally clear that he is not instructed to attend nor required to do any official act there.  Nor is this because the subject of visitation & inspection escaped your attention.  In the year 1873, you passed the following resolution,

Resolved, That the President be requested to appoint annually a committee of three members of this

 

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Board, any of whom is authorized to appoint alternate members as to Board of Visitors to attend the Commencement of the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega, who shall report to the next ensuing meeting of this Board.”

It is clear to my mind, that it is not my duty or prerogative to sign the Diplomas of that College or officially confer its Degrees.  I agree with my immediate predecessor that, “the Diploma is not the Diploma of the University of Georgia”, but that “of the North Georgia Agricultural College”; and consequently without specific instructions from you, I have no right nor duties in the premises.  And the Local Board of Trustees at Dahlonega seem to be of my opinion; for they have applied to me neither to sign the Diplomas nor to confer the Degrees.  The only application made to me is that I should attend at Dahlonega and preach the Commencement Sermon.

There are but two items in your minutes touching the conferring of Degrees in the Department at Dahlonega, and the present course of action there is in harmony with neither.

On August 4th. 1875 these words were recorded:

“Mr. Hull, Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline, made a verbal report recommending that the North Georgia College of Agriculture be authorized to grant certificate of Proficiency to its Pupils, but not Diplomas, which as adopted.”

July 28th 1877, the Board adopted as a part of the Report of the Committee on Laws and Discipline, Mr. Hull Chairman, the following:  “Upon the certificate of the President of the North Georgia Agricultural College that a young man there graduating, has undergone a satisfactory examination in all the studies required by the University of Georgia for a Bachelor’s Degree in any named Department, such graduate shall be entitled to receive such Degree from the University.”

                        So far as I know no certificate of the

 

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kind has been made to you or to any one authorized by you to receive it; and it is certain the Diplomas were conferred this year at Dahlonega, before you had the opportunity to pass upon any certificate and authorize such act, - as you pass upon the recommendations of the Officers in the three Departments here, and authorize the Degrees, before they are conferred.

In this connection, there are many things, anomalous and embarrassing to all concerned.

1st.  A Degree is conferred in one of the Colleges of the University, for which the latter has a quasi responsibility since its name is on the Diploma; when it has in no way authorized it or even in terms consented to it.

2nd.  In the same University the same Degree is conferred on the students of two different Colleges - the two parties not having pursued the same curriculum of study; and not having been subjected to the same examination; and it not being made to appear that they had, “made exactly the same attainments in variety and degree.”

3rd.  Besides the Medical College and the Law School, there are in the same University three so-called Colleges - viz: Franklin College, The State College, and the North Georgia College.  The first two have no right of themselves to confer any Degree, but the last exercises such prerogative.  The University Faculty here, not that of each College, examine the students of each, applying the same tests to all seeking for the same Degree and recommending to your honorable Body, Trustees of the University as a whole, such students as they the Faculty of all the Departments here, think worthy of graduation.

But the North Georgia College at Dahlonega has rights and privileges superior to other Colleges in the University, at least of equal grade.  Its Faculty can confer Degrees without consulting University Faculties or University Trustees.

 

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4th.  We have then a fourth anomoly (sic) in the fact that the University seems to be organizing two of its Colleges as competitors and rivals.  It is much to be regretted that the organization is not such that it is for the interest of every Department that all the others should be prosperous and successful. 

It is for the interest of all concerned that your honorable Body settle definitely and authoritatively the status of the North Georgia College - i.e. its normal relations to other bodies in our University system.  If it is your pleasure to admit and maintain that it is a College in the University of the same grade with Franklin College, and with the State College, thoroughly competent by its endowment, its appointments and its equipments (sic) to confer education equal in kind and degree, then it is proper that you should put them all upon the same footing, and subject them to the same requirements.  The same examining body that passes upon the attainments of candidates for Degrees, and the same body that passes upon the recommendations and authorizes the conferring of the Degrees, should hold jurisdiction in all cases alike.  Students seeking for the same Degrees in Franklin College, in the State College, and in North Georgia College, should be examined by the same Board, over the same grounds by the same or equivalent examination questions; and these passing successfully the ordeal, should by the Chancellor be recommended for graduation to your honorable Body, the guardians of, and the highest authority over, the whole University and all its Departments.

This is the system that prevails at Oxford and Cambridge in England.  In the former University, there are twenty three Colleges and Halls, and in the latter nineteen.  Not one of these Colleges has a right to confer Degrees.  The University at each place alone, has this right.  It appoints the examining Committees for all, & it alone authorizes the Chancellor to confer the Degrees.

 

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True it is admitted, it would be somewhat embarrassing for candidates for degrees to come from Dahlonega here to be examined and to receive their Degrees; but perhaps some method may be devised by which the difficulty may be obviated.  If however this may be found to be impossible, it will only prove that the Institution at Dahlonega is, and of right ought to be an independent College, exercising its own rights and bearing its own responsibilities.  I respectfully therefore suggest for your consideration the two following alternatives.

1st.  If the North Georgia College has the necessary equipment to enable it to maintain the true College grade, it should be put upon the same basis with the other Colleges in our system.  It should have the same rights and be subjected to the same restrictions that pertain to the two Colleges here.

If for any reason this may be considered impracticable or undesirable, then

2nd.  It should be persuaded amicably and avowedly to with-draw from our system with which now it has only a nominal connection, and go forward as an independent Institution for the accomplishment of the work before it.  In this event of course, the University will continue to meet all its pecuniary engagements to it, and all of us from whom it separates would bid it God speed in its career of honor and of usefulness.

I will only add that whatever specific duties you may prescribe for me in connection with the Department at Dahlonega, I will not hesitate to discharge heartily and to the best of my ability.

Death of Professors.

Before the opening of the term after your last Session, it pleased God by sudden death to remove from our number Prof. Wm. Henry Waddell.  Endowed with rare gifts and attainments, he more than sustained the historic name that in the persons of his ancestors

 

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had illustrated the University of Georgia; and he bid fair to rise to the highest eminence as a scholar, an educator and an author.  A child of this University well informed in reference to its history, its traditions and its internal arrangements and workings. - having the cordial esteem of his colleagues, and the confidence respect and love of the students, - he was not only an oracle in our midst, but a power in the College community, the loss of which is painfully felt.  Long years ago he made his peace with God, and the death summons though sudden, did not find him unprepared.

It pleased God also during the last year to remove from earth Dr. R. M. Smith, who since the death of Dr. R. D. Morre, has been Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence to the students of the Law School.  A useful man, an honored citizen, a skillful physician and an interesting and instructive lecturer, he came to a Christians’ grave after protracted and harrassing (sic) sickness, carrying with him the respect & esteem of the whole community.

It is a reason of devout thankfulness to God that the valuable lives of all the members of your venerable Body have been spared during the past year; and that death has made no inroad into the ranks of the students.

Recommended for Graduation.

The Faculty beg leave through me to recommend to your honorable Body for graduation, the gentlemen whose names are mentioned below:

For Master of Arts and for

Civil and Mining Engineer.

                        Louis H. Jones, -                      and                   Thomas S. Mell.

For Bachelor of Arts.

                        J. Hooper Alexander,                                       Ignatius L. Candler,

                        Edward T. Bishop,                                           Samuel C. Candler,

                        James Bishop Jr.                                               Carleton B. Chapman,

                        Elijah A. Brown,                                               R. Toombs Du Bose,

 

 

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Bachelor of Arts. (continued.)

                        Joseph H. Felker,                                             Joseph H. Napier,

                        Felix R. Groover,                                              Cadar S. Parker,

                        Wallace W. Lambdin,                                       Richard B. Russell,

                        Lewis F. McCord,                                            John J. Strickland,

                        Wm. J. McCurdy,                                            George W. Trenchard.

For Bachelor of Science

                        B. Johnston Edwards,                                       Wyche W. Linton,

                                                            John F. Parker.

For Bachelor of Philosophy.

                        William Y. Griffin,                                             William E. Smith,

                        Richard B. Russell,                                           John G. Stanley.

For Bachelor of Agriculture.

John B. Hattaway.

For Bachelor of Chemical Science.

                        Sylvanus G. Carter                                           Eugene J. Frederick.

For Bachelor of Law.

                        John T. Anderson,                                            Alexander R. Jones,

                        J. Haygood Armstrong,                         Wm. M. Ragsdale,

                        T. Charlton Du Pont,                                        John J. Strickland.

 

Processions to the Chapel.

I agree with many individuals of your honorable Body that our Processions into the Chapel could be, and ought to be, made more impressive.  I beg leave therefore respectfully to recommend that you appoint as early as possible a Committee to present for your adoption a programme(sic) for such processions.

                                                            I have the honor to be

                                                Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees,

                                                                        Your Ob’t. Ser’t.

                                                                                                P. H. Mell

                                                                                    Chancellor University of Georgia.

 

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Branch Colleges.

At the close of reading the Annual Communication of the Chancellor, Col. Price, President of the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega - our branch college - was heard in its behalf, and Mr. Hammond in behalf of the contemplated branch college at Thomasville,

The Board then adjourned to 4 o’clock P. M.

 

                                                                                    August 1st. 1879 4 o’clock P. M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Messrs. Gresham and Screven appeared and took their seats.

The abstract of the Minutes of the Prudential Committee was read and on notion of Mr. Vason was ratified, and is as follows:

1st.  The Committee decided that the rent of $250.00 for Rock College should be paid quarterly by the teacher who may be elected.

2nd.  There was no meeting of the Committee on the 16th. of September, as required, in relation to the High School as there was no quorum in the city.

3rd.  David C. Barrow Jr. Esqr. was elected Adjunct Professor of Mathematics and Assistant in the Engineer Department at a salary of $1000.00

4th.  The Committee requested Mr. Jenkins our President to call a meeting of the Board on Oct. 15th. 1878 to fill the Chair of Ancient Languages and Literature made vacant by the lamented death of Professor Wm. Henry Waddell, which call was made, but no quorum attending the meeting consisting of four resident Trustees and four non-resident Trustees and thus lacking only one of a quorum resolved, in view of the necessity of the case to form the Prudential Committee and which Committee assisted by the non-resident Trustees, unanimously elected Prof. Wm. G. Woodfin, Professor of Ancient Languages and Literature.

Dr. Miller presided at this meeting and filled up

 

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August 1879.

the Committee on Honors and the Committee to audit the Treasurer’s Accounts.

5th.  The Committee instructed the Treasurer to supply the Professor of Agriculture and Horticulture with such funds as were absolutely necessary to carry on the farm &e.

6th.  The Committee was embarrassed on the subject of the Dormitories at this time and after an interview with the Chancellor, concluded that it was impracticable at this time and would involve the loss of student now in attendance.

7th.  The house occupied by Mr. Brumby was agreed to be rented till August or October 1879.

8th.  The Committee invited John C. Rutherford Esqr. of Macon, to deliver his Paris Lecture before the students and others.

9th.  The Committee endorse the enterprises of John W. Glenn Esqr. in relation to a Normal College in connection with Dr. Sears Agent of the Peabody Fund.

The Committee submit their Minutes with this abstract.

                                                            Respectfully submitted

                                                                                    Wm L. Mitchell,

                                                                                                Chairman.

 

Mr. Clarke then addressed the Board in behalf of the contemplated Branch College at Cuthbert.

The subjects discussed by Messrs. Price, Hammond and Clarke in relation to the Branch Colleges at Dahlonega, Cuthbert, and Thomasville, were referred to a special committee of five consisting of Messrs. Stephens, Vason, James Jackson, Gresham and Yancey.

                                    The Board then adjourned to 10 o’clock tomorrow morning.

 

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Branch Colleges.

                                                                                    August 2nd. 1879. 10 o’clock A. M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Messrs. Cooper, Brown and Gordon appeared and took their seats and Mr. Cooper, Vice President assumed the Chair.

A communication from Profs. Charbonnier and White asking compensation for extra services in the year 1877-1878 was read and referred to the finance committee.

The Special Committee of Five on Branch Colleges made their report through Mr. James Jackson which was received and laid on the table for the present.

The Committees on Buildings & on the Law Department made their reports which were received and laid on the table for the present.

The report of the Special Committee of Five on Branch Colleges was taken up on motion of Mr. James Jackson for the purpose of hearing the views of members on the subject, and after the discussion its further consideration was postponed to 4 o’clock P. M.

The Chair appointed the standing Committee on Laws and Discipline viz:

Mr. Gresham, Chairman, Messrs. Crawford, Screven, Stephens, Hall, Cobb and Brown.

The Chair also appointed the Committee of Invitation viz:  Messrs. Gordon, & Hall.

An invitation was received from Dr. and Mrs. Mell, inviting all members of the Board of Trustees to a Reception at the Chancellors’ residence on Wednesday night the 6th. instant, at 8 ½ to 12 o’clock with their families and guests, and all such ladies and gentlemen as any of them may be pleased to bring.  This invitation was accepted by the Board and the Secretary instructed to communicate our acceptance to Dr. and Mrs. Mell in suitable terms.

 

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August 1879.

The Report of the Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture was read and laid on the table for the present.

Mr. Speer was excused from further attendance on account of his wife’s sickness.

The Board then adjourned to 4 o’clock this afternoon.

                                                                        August 2nd 1879. 4 o’clock P. M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Mr. Cobb introduced a resolution to make tuition free which was referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline.

The special Committee of Five on Branch Colleges called up their Report, which was amended first by the Committee, and then on motion of Mr. Brown so as to extend to Milledgeville the same assistance as is contemplated for Cuthbert and Thomasville.

Upon the motion to adopt as amended, the yeas and nays were called for.  Those voting in the affirmative are Messrs. Mitchell, Lewis, Brown, Yancey, Vason, James Jackson, Crawford, Hull, Barrow, Gordon, Screven, Stephens, and Davenport Jackson. -- 13.

Those voting in the negative are Messrs. Cooper, Cobb, Gresham, Harris. -- 4.

The Report is as follows:

                                                                                    The Special Committee appointed to consider and report upon the applications of the South Georgia & the Southwest Georgia Agricultural Colleges, for assistance from this Board out of the income of the Land Script Fund in order to inaugurate their respective Colleges, or Branches of the State Agricultural College of this University, report as follows:

            1st.  We find that the South Georgia Agricultural College located at Thomasville is ready to

 

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Branch Colleges.

make good title to real estate consisting of land and suitable buildings thereon.  A part of the land consists of one hundred and twenty acres in a tract,  fifty acres of which is deemed sufficient for educational purposes, having seventy acres which the Local Board wish to sell in order to add to the present buildings and to erect a Chapel.

In the event of their union with us we are willing that said Board retain said seventy acres, for said purpose. 

2nd.  We find that the South West Georgia Agricultural College, located at Cuthbert is ready also to make good title to real estate adequate for the purpose in hand.

3rd.  With the strictest economy and with an earnest desire to extend the benefits of the Land Script Fund as widely as possible, we are enabled at present to appropriate $2000.00 annually to each of these Colleges as Branches of the Agricultural College located at the seat of the University and we recommend the appropriation of that sum to each for the present, and hereafter such sum to the extent of our ability and only such sum as will not interfere with the existing organization and efficiency of the Parent, Agricultural College of the University at Athens.

The Fund is in Bonds, and the high rate of interest they now bear may not be of long continuence (sic) and our income will then decrease, therefore we con-fine this amount of aid to the present, gratified that we are able to furnish it at this time.

4th.  We grant this aid and accept the property on the same terms as in the case of the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega except as herein after stipulated.

  1. The curriculum of study is to be prescribed by the Chancellor of the University after conference with the

 

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August 1879.

Presidents of the said Colleges.

  1. The Presidents are to be elected by this Board and to be paid out of this fund of two thousand dollars now appropriated, his salary to be fixed by this Board and the Professors and Teachers to be selected by the local Boards subject to ratification by this Board at its next ensuing session.
  2. No Degrees, Diplomas, or Certificates of Proficiency shall be conferred by these Branch Colleges except by and with the advice and consent of the Trustees of this University and shall be there conferred by the Chancellor in person or by the Presidents of the said Branch Colleges when designated by him or in the absence of the Presidents by some other suitable person in like manner designated by the Chancellor.
  3. Vacancies which may occur in the present local Boards of these Branch Colleges shall be filled by the Board of Trustees of this University.
  4. In the event that the Presidents elect of these Branch Colleges or either of them decline the appointment or a vacancy occurs in any other way, the Prudential Committee shall be authorized and instructed to fill such vacancy.

Judge Vason was appointed a committee of this Board to draw up the agreement in accordance with the above terms and to inspect and receive the titles to said property.

Resolved, That whenever the Citizens or City of Milledgeville shall tender to the Trustees of the University of Georgia the two hundred acres of land heretofore proposed by them and shall also tender buildings sufficient for the purpose whether such buildings shall be conveyed as their own property or the use of the buildings of the State, authorized by Act of the Legislature, the Trustees will and do hereby accept the administration of such property to be used to establish and conduct a School as a Branch of the State College of Agriculture

 

 

 

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Branch Colleges.

and the Mechanic Arts, and do hereby appropriate $2000.00 to support Teachers in said Branch College and do hereby appoint Hon. David A. Vason to act as an Agent and Attorney in behalf of the Trustees to examine titles to property, to see that there is a compliance with the terms and conditions prescribed for the acceptance of the Colleges at Cuthbert and Thomasville, and upon all such conditions being complied with, to close the arrangement, and such being done, said Attorney notify the Secretary and Treasurer of the Board of Trustees, who upon such notification shall be authorized to pay ever to the local Board of Trustees of said Milledgeville College, or proper representative the money herein before appropriated at such times and in such amounts as shall be prescribed for Cuthbert and Thomasville Colleges.

The Report of the Committee on Agriculture & Horticulture was taken up adopted, amended, and is as follows: 

To the Honorable Board of Trustees

                                                of the University of Georgia

Your committee on the Department of Agriculture, and Experimental Farm, beg leave to report:  That the very full and detailed Report of the Prof. of Agriculture gives all information necessary as to the management of the Farm and its financial results.  The Report of Prof. Browne of the experiments made in the cultivation of different crops, method of culture, application of different fertilizers, comparison of production, as to natural soil and that which was fertilized, and the difference in the use of various kinds of manures made before the State Agricultural Convention at Hawkinsville at its late Spring Session was interesting and afforded to Agriculturists valuable & scientific information.  It has been the custom of the Professor of Agriculture to annually report all experiments on the Farm for the year preceeding(sic) to the

 

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August 1879.

February conventions of the farmers of the State.

There are no essays before that body more highly appreciated, as affording practical and scientific teaching.  This intelligent body of our Citizens may in a sense be considered a school of our College.  It is the best and most economical method of publishing experiments of the farm to the people.  It is likewise an admirable plan for attaching the people to our College.  Your committee therefore urge a greater liberality upon the part of the Board towards the Experimental Farm.  It teachings are desired by the large and intelligent body of representitave (sic) farmers.  The Chairman of your Committee during a tour last September saw farms of Colleges and the Mechanic Arts; the buildings were numerous, of elegant architecture and the grounds ornamented with tree, shrub and flower, made a thing of beauty.  These experimental farms are not designed to be a profit in dollars and cents; their teachings are of a value far beyond an estimate by such a standard.  Your committee would guard against extravagance, but would urge the Board to a higher appreciation of the Experimental Farm & to extend the appropriation for it a little beyond the cent per cent policy heretofore pursued.

The front yard of our farm building has hither to been allowed to be a waste like to an abandoned old-field.  In the brief occupation by Prof. Browne it has been made to appear as the surrounding of a civilized abode, the result of his labor and taste, with little or no cost to our fund.  Some appropriation for shrubs and flowers and choice plants and a hot house would not only beautify the grounds but prove auxiliaries to the teaching of Botany, Horticulture and Floriculture as Sciences, cultivating likewise.

Your committee would ask attention to the estimates of the Professor, receipts, expenditures & things needed:

 

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Experimental Farm.

Receipts estimated - that is, sale of crops for this year _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $398.70

But reserving for stock, corn, oats, lucerne, fodder turnips there would be left avalable(sic) for future expenses only _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _ _$278.00

Estimated expenses (ordinary) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   278.00

Asked for manures, cotton seed, barnyard & Commercial fertilizers _ _ _ _ _ _ _    117.00

For implements necessary as old ones are worn out _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   142.00

For hot house, shrubs, plants and flowers, _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   100.00

Therefore                                                                                                                     359.00

            Resolved

                        That the sum of Three hundred and fifty nine dollars (independent of the sales of the growing crop) be appropriated to the Experimental Farm to be expended for the purposes enumerated above to be drawn for by the Prof. of Agriculture upon the Agricultural fund as he may need for the purposes aforesaid.

            Resolved

                        That Prof. Wm. M. Browne be requested to withdraw or withhold his resignation of his Chair and be requested to continue in the discharge of the duties of his Professorship.

                                                                                    Respectfully submitted

                                                                                                Benj. C. Yancey

                                                                                                            Chairman

The Committee submit a supplemental report:

It appearing that Prof. Browne by his itemized report to the Treasurer supported by vouchers has paid out of his private funds $103.40/100 not refunded to him by the Treasurer, (not being drawn for) your committee recommend an appropriation of $103.40/100 to refund Prof. Browne.

                                                                                    Respectfully Submitted for the Committee.

                        Benj. C. Yancey

                                                Chairman.

 

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August 1879.

Which Supplemental report was also adopted.  Mr. Gresham read a letter and submitted a resolution in relation to a donation of money to the Board to accumulate at compound interest which was referred to a committee, consisting of Messrs. Gresham, Gordon & Brown.

Mr. James Jackson obtained leave of absence after this meeting.

The committee on Finance submitted their report which was laid on the table for the present.

Mr. Cobb submitted a Resolution to reduce the rent on the houses occupied by Professors which was referred to the committee on Finance.

The Board there adjourned to Monday morning at 9 o’clock.

 

                                                                                    August 4th. 1879. 9 o’clock A. M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Messrs. Miller, Toombs, and Lawton appeared and took their seats.

A letter was received from Gen. Wm. M. Browne with-drawing his resignation and consenting to continue in the discharge of the duties of his Professorship, with grateful acknowledgements to the Board for the terms in which they speak of his services.

 

The committee on the Library submitted their report which was laid on the table for the present.

Mr. Lewis submitted a resolution to pay Trustees visiting the Branch Colleges as Committee men of the Board their expenses which resolution was on his motion referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline.

On motion of Mr. Brown in view of the death of Mrs. Speer wife of Hon. Emory Speer a member of this Board, the Board adjourned to 9 o’clock A. M. tomorrow.

 

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Report of Committee on Laws & Discipline.

                                                                                    August 5th. 1879. 9 o’clock A. M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

The Report of the Committee on Laws & Discipline was made by their Chairman Mr. Gresham, which was received and taken up, whereupon Mr. Stephens moved to amend by striking out the word “fifty” and inserting the word “eighty” in that part of the report making an appropriation to Mr. J. H. Armstrong for past services to the Library, which amendment was agreed to.  The further consideration of the report was temporarily suspended to give Mr. Gordon an opportunity to move the election of Presidents for the Branch Colleges at Cuthbert and Thomasville which motion itself was postponed for Gov. Brown’s resolution which was adopted and is as follows.

                        Resolved,

                                    That the salary of the President of the Faculty at Thomasville & Cuthbert be fixed at the sum of twelve hundred & fifty dollars each.

Then on motion of Mr. Gordon the Board went into the election of a President of the Branch College at Thomasville and also of the Branch College at Cuthbert.  Upon counting the votes it appeared that O. D. Scott, Esq. was elected President of the Branch College at Thomasville, and V. T. Sanford President of the Branch College at Cuthbert.

The Board then resumed the consideration of the report of the Committee on Laws and Discipline, when it was moved to strike-out the first section of the report & the Board then took a recess till after the delivery of the speech of Hon. Alexander H. Stephens before the Alumni Society.

 

P.S. Mr. Toombs by permission of the Board recorded his vote against granting aid to the new Branch Colleges.

 

 

 

 

 

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August 1879.

                                                                                    August 5th. 1879. Afternoon

The Board met after the delivery of Mr. Stephens speech and resumed business.

The report of the Committee on Laws and Discipline was taken up by sections for adoption and the first section was adopted upon a call of the yeas and nays.  Those who voted in the affermative (sic) were Messrs. Mitchell, Hall, Barrow, Cobb, Gresham, Harris, Lawton, MacIntyre - 8.

Those who voted in the negative were Messrs. Cooper, Miller, Lewis, Brown, Toombs, Yancey and Crawford - 7.

The second section of the report was read and adopted.

The third section of the report was read & adopted.

The report as adopted is as follows:

The Committee on Laws and Discipline to whom has been referred the very able and elaborate annual report of the Chancellor made to the Trustees, have had the same under consideration and make the following report, in relation to such matters therein contained as seem to your committee to require action.

Dormitory System.

At the last annual meeting of this Body the following resolutions were passed:

Resolved, “That the students shall hereafter occupy the Dormitory buildings and be under proper surveillance under the direction of the Faculty - provided exceptional cases may be disposed of by the Faculty.”

Resolved, “That in resuming the Dormitory System the house on Lumpkin street, built to furnish cheap boarding, by being occupied rent free, and the same is hereby appropriated for that purpose as soon as the rent thereof expires and a suitable occupant can be obtained & that the Prudential Committee be charged with this matter.”

 

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Report of Committee on Laws & Discipline.

This action of the Board for reasons stated at length by the Chancellor was not carried into effect by the Prudential Committee and the matter is now before us for action.

Your Committee feel very reluctant to resind (sic) a resolution which was only passed at the last session of the Board but the difficulties of executing it seem so great that we are constrained to recommend a modification of it.  The College building known as the New College is now occupied as a boarding house by Mrs. Richardson, and no complaints have been made and the arrangement seems satisfactory.  We propose that that building be not disturbed; and we recommend that the Old College building be repaired and that the Prudential Committee secure if possible a suitable person to keep it as a Boarding house for the students.  If that be found impracticable then that the Faculty endeavor to have its rooms occupied by students, but in no event to have it closed, if the students can be induced to occupy it. 

Library.

The Chancellor in his report recommends the employment by the Board of a suitable person with a competent salary to act as Librarian - one who shall at all times be present to wait on parties wishing to take out books or to visit the Library.  These views of the Chancellor we heartily approve, but with the present demands on the Treasury your committee do not feel authorized to recommend any change in the present system of employing an undergraduate with a small compensation to act as Librarian, unless one of the Faculty can be induced to accept of the same position.

Your committee recommend that the Library at stated periods say quarterly should go through a thorough inspection by the Chancellor to see that no books are lost and for this purpose if necessary that all books be called in and none taken out for

 

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August 1879.

a given period.  Your committee recommend that $80.00 be paid to Mr. J. H. Armstrong for this services in making a catalogue of the books of the Library.

Museum.

It is represented that from time to time various articles of value in the nature of curiosities and illustrations of antiquities are sent to the University.  With a little effort the number of these articles could be increased, if we had a proper place for their storage and display.  At present we have no such place, but we are informed that the third floor of the Library building at present partly occupied as a Mineralogical cabinet with a suitable expenditure might be fitted up and made a suitable place for such purpose.  Your committee recommended that $50.00 be appropriated for this object.

North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega.

Your Committee regret to learn from the Chancellor’s report that there is some conflict between the University and the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega in relation to the conferring of degrees.  It was certainly supposed that when the North Georgia Agricultural College was established at Dahlonega, it was to be a component part of this University.  There are at present two other Colleges viz:  Franklin College and the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts which are integral parts of the University.  The Degrees in these two Colleges have always been conferred by this Board of Trustees on the recommendation of the combined Faculties - as it was impracticable for the Faculty here to attend at Dahlonega to examine candidates for degrees or to require their students to present themselves here, and as that time there were no students at Dahlonega

 

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Report of Committee on Laws & Discipline.

sufficiently advanced to become applicants for the degree of A. B. it was provided in August 1874 that the North Georgia College of Agriculture be authorized to grant Certificates of Proficiency to its pupils - afterwards in 1877 it was provided that upon the certificate of the President of the North Georgia Agricultural College that a young man there graduating has undergone a satisfactory examination in all the studies required by the University of Georgia for Bachelor’s degree in any named Department, such graduate should be entitled to receive such degree from the University.

So far as your Committee is advised this provision has not been complied with.  But the North Georgia Agricultural College having obtained from Lumpkin County Superior Court a Charter authorizing them to confer degrees have gone forward and conferred degrees without reference to their Connection with this University or its Board of Trustees.

In view of the difficulties of the case your committee recommend that the Chancellor shall attend the final examination at Dahlonega and that if he shall be satisfied from such examination that a young man there graduating has attained proficiency in all the studies required by the University of Georgia for a Bachelor’s Degree in any named Department he shall be authorized to confer such degree upon the student in the name of the University.

Degrees.

Your Committee recommend that the degrees be conferred upon the young men of the graduating classes as named in the Chancellor’s Report.

 

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August 1879.

 - The Committee on Laws and Discipline, to which was referred the Resolution.  That tuition shall be free to all white citizens of Georgia in the State College of Agriculture and Franklin College, respectfully recommend that this resolution do not pass.

The estimate of receipts from tuition during the next scholastic year is about $3500.00  With the large appropriations already made we think that the University cannot afford to give up this amount.

Which report was agreed to upon a call of the yeas and nays.

Those voting in the affermative (sic) are Messrs. Cooper, Mitchell, Miller, Lewis, Brown, Toombs, Crawford, Hall, Barrow, Grisham, Harris, Lawton, MacIntyre - 13.

Those voting in the negative are Mr. Cobb - 1.

 - The Committee on Laws and Discipline further report that the resolution referred to them, providing for the payment of the expenses of one or more of the Trustees who shall attend the annual exercises of the Branch Institutions established by this Board, be not passed.

There are now three of these Institutions and your Committee do not think it proper to burden our Treasury with the expense called for by this Resolution:  Which Report was adopted

 - The Committee on Laws and Discipline submitted the following resolution which was adopted.

Resolved, That hereafter the terms of study in the University, shall begin on the first Wednesday of October and continue with one week’s intermission at Christmas until the third Wednesday in July and that the Commencement shall hereafter be on the third Wednesday in July.

The Board then adjourned till 9 o’clock tomorrow morning.

 

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Report of Committee on Laws & Discipline.

Board met according to adjournment.  August 6th. 1879. 9 o’clock A. M.

Mr. Harris in behalf of the Committee on Honorary Degrees submitted the following report.  That the required notice having been given of the proposition to confer the Honorary degree of LL.D. on the Hon. James Jackson of Atlanta and Chancellor John LeConte and Prof. Joseph LeConte of the University of California and the degree of Doctor of Divinity on the Rev. David Lyman Buttolph of Marietta, recommend that said Honorary Degrees be conferred.

                                    P. H. Mell                }  Committee.

                                    Young L. G. Harris }

Which report was adopted.

 

Mr. Gresham, Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline moved to reconsider their general report on the annual communication of the Chancellor as relates to the Dormitory System, which motion prevailed and the following amendment was proposed to be substituted there for and adopted.

After careful consideration your Committee recommend the following action:

1st.  That the house on Lumpkin Street be taken possession of and be let rent free to some proper person who will take students as day Boardes (sic).

2nd.  That the Prudential Committee shall have both the College Dormitory Buildings, thoroughly repaired and clensed (sic) and the students be required to occupy them, with the following exceptions.

  1. All students residing in Athens.
  2. The Members of the Senior Class who shall prefer to room in town.
  3. All students who shall bring the written request of their parents or guardians asking that they be allowed to room in town.

With these exceptions the Faculty are instructed to require other students to room in the College Dormitories.

 

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August 1879.

Mr. Brown moved to appropriate the sum of $50.00 for the construction of a privy, for the convenience of the Board and the Prudential Committee be requested to see the same properly executed.

Which motion prevailed.

On motion of Mr. Stephens the report on the Library was taken up and amended, and adopted and is as follows:

                                    Gentlemen, -

                                                            You can readily perceive that a great improvement has been made, in the library since our last report and the books are now secure provided you have a competent librarian who will give his whole attention to it.  Our library is a very valuable one and needs such attention.  One year ago after consultation with the Faculty we reported that there was no necessity purchasing any more books for reference; but we were much astonished by being informed by Prof. Woodfin that there were no reference books in the Department of Ancient Languages, not even a lexicon, except the Delphini edition of the classics.  This shows the importance of having a Librarian who is not an undergraduate and who will not feel that he must obey every Professor.

Whilst that system may be of temporary benefit to an undergraduate it is of less importance that trusting so valuable a property - to as a general rule - such irresponsible persons.

The work of Mr. Armstrong in cataloguing and arranging the books has been one of great importance and required great labor.

We recommend

1st.  That Mr. Armstrong be employed to carry out the suggestion made in Article 7th. of his report under the supervision of the Chancellor at a salary of two dollars per day, and ten hours to be counted as a day.

 

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Professors’ Houses and Donation.

2nd.  We recommend that the sum of Seventy five dollars ($75.00) or so much as may be necessary be appropriated for the rebinding of the books needing it.  Amended to read Fifty dollars.

 

 

 

3rd.  That the thanks are due Mr. Armstrong for the manner in which he has taken care of the books and commendation to the whole body of students upon his report that not a single book has been lost or injured during the year.

                        Respectfully Submitted

                                                Lamar Cobb

                                                            Chairman

 

Mr. Cobb submitted a resolution on the reduction of the rent of the Professors’ houses, when Mr. Brown submitted the following Resolutions, which were acceptable to Mr. Cobb and adopted by the Board.

Resolved, That Ferdinand Phinizy and Stevens Thomas of Athens be requested to inspect and place a resonable (sic) valuation on the Chancellor’s and Professors’ houses upon the Campus in the College grounds and that the Chancellor and each Professor who occupies one of the buildings be required to pay the insurance of the building to such amount as said Phinizy and Thomas may say is proper and that each in addition to the payment of the insurance pay a rental of 4% on the amount of said value. 

Resolved, further, That the Prudential Committee see to the insurance of said buildings.

 

Mr. Gresham submitted the following resolutions which were adopted.

Whereas it has been represented to this Board that a friend of the University desires to make a donation for its benefit with the view that it shall be kept at compound interest for a given time before being used;

Resolved, That this Board will receive from such friend the sum which he may choose to give and will act as Trustee for the fund and invest the same

 

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August 1879.

in the manner which the donor shall designate or in Georgia State Bonds and reinvest in the same manner the interest which shall be received thereon for the time designated by the donor.

Resolved, further, That this Board pledges itself that the principal and interest of such fund shall be kept in-tact and not used in any manner until the expiration of the time designated by the donor and then only in the manner which by him shall be authorized & set forth.

Resolved, That a committee of two be appointed to carry out these Resolutions.

                                                                                    Messrs. Gresham and Billups were appointed the committee under said Resolutions.

 

The report of the Committee on Finance was taken up, adopted and is as follows:

            To the Hon. Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia:

                                                The Finance Committee respectfully submit the following report.

From the itemized account of the Treasurer from July 21st. 1878 to July 21st. 1879 it appears that the receipts from all sources were _ _ _   $33,377.97.

and the disbursements, same period _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 35,788.11.

Adding the amount of Cash as a ballance(sic)

unexpended in the hands of the Treasurer

on July 21st. 1878 to the above stated receipts

to wit the sum of _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _9,686.79

Receipts _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _33.377.97

Exhibiting total sum of _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $ 43064.76

in the hands of Treasurer during the

past fiscal year.

Deducting disbursements _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _35,788.11

Exhibits a balance (sic) of                                                 $ 7,276.65

in the hands of the Treasurer

July 21st. 1879. avalable (sic) for current expenses for fiscal year 1879-80.

 

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Report of Finance Committee.

But as this ballance(sic) is a mixed fund it may be will to present a segregated statement viz:

Cash ballance(sic) July 21st. 1879 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $ 7,276.65

Belonging to Landscript Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $ 4,788.65

     “            “  Library          “     _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _649.89

     “       remainder to General or

Academical (sic) Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  1,838.11

                                                                                      $ 7,276.65

 

The disbursements on account of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanics Arts were                                                                         $15,882.80

Annual income of Landscript fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  17.914.14

Unexpended of fiscal year 1878-79_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$  2.031.34

Cash in Treasurer’s hands of this fund

as a ballance (sic) unexpended for fiscal year 1877-78 _2,757.31

Belonging to A. and M. Arts Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $4,788.65

and in Treasurer’s hands July 21st. 1879.

 

The income of the Academical(sic) Department including

Library Fees was _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $15,463.83

Unexpended ballance (sic) for fiscal year 1877-78.

Library _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1,207.50

General Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  783.06           1,990.56

Total Cash for fiscal year 1878-79 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$17,454.39

Expended    “      “       “       “      “ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  14,966.39

To credit of Accademical(sic) Fund July 21st 1879 _ _$2,488.00

If segregated, say Library _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$680.00

Accademical(sic) Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1808.00

                                                                    2488.00

 

The Expenditure for Apparatus under the Legislative appropriation of $15000.00 for the past fiscal year was _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $4,938.92

By which it will appear that the appropriation has been exhausted.

 

(155)

August 1879.

Your Committee submit estimates of avalable(sic) means and for expenditures for the current fiscal year 1879-80.

Avalable (sic) Means.

Cash ballance (sic) in hands of Treasurer _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$ 7,276.65

   “    annual payment by State of interest _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _8,000.00

Interest on General fund in Bonds _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  649.00

Rents of Professors houses _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1,347.50

Library fees _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _740.00

Interest on Terrell endowment _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  1,400.00

      “      “   Landscript fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 17,914.14

Tuition fees _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 3,580.00

                                                                                        $40,907.29

Estimated Expenditures.

Catalogues _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $219.40

Advertising and Printing _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  330.00

Music _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  125.00

Servant hire _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  576.00

Postage _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   173.73

Stationery _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  100.00

Fuel _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  175.00

Insurance _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   190.00

Medals _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _42.00

Chemicals _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  114.00

Repairs to wit

For Chancellor’s place _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $150.00

General repairs _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _200.00

Library Building _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 150.00

For chairs _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  50.00

For Chapel _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 250.00

Campus grounds, trees & fences _ _ _ _ _ _ _400.00 _ _ _ _1200.00

Incidentals _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _235.00

Salaries _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 24125.00

Cuthbert _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  2000.00

Thomasville _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  2000.00

To refund Prof. Browne’s personal expenditure for farm _ _ _103.40

Library _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _740.00

                                                Carried forward _ _ _ _ _ _ $32,448.53

 

(156)

Report of Finance Committee.

Brought forward _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$32,448.53

Repairs - apparatus _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  50.00

Experimental Farm _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _359.00

For past services (fitting up Library by Armstrong) _ _ _ _ _ _  80.00

For fitting up Dormitories if so much be necessary _ _ _ _ _ _ 250.00

For binding books if so much be necessary _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 50.00

Salaries for Milledgeville Dept. - if the citizens of Milledgeville

shall present property and buildings complying with terms as

prescribed in Gov. Brown’s resolution _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 2,000.00

Aggregate _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$35,237.53

 

The proportion of the foregoing expenditures to be charged to the Landscript fund may be stated as follows:

Catalogue _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$109.70

Advertising and Printing _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _165.00

Music _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 62.50

Postage _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  86.50

Stationery _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 50.00

Fuel _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 87.50

Chemicals _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  107.00

Incidentals _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 150.00

Servants hire _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 384.00

Salaries _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   21000.00

Repairs of Apparatus _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _25.00

Experimental Farm _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 359.00

Refunding Prof. Browne for money expended in excess of what was drawn from the Land script fund for wants of the farm _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _  103.40

Total to Land script Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $22,689.60

 

Deduct the amount of expenditure charged to the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts and the remainder will exhibit the amount to be charged to the Academic or General fund, under the present organization $12,547.93

 

(157)

August 1879.

The Committee submits a statement of the Assets of the University.

 

I.   Land-script Fund.

Bonds of the State of Georgia 8% April & October _ _ _ _ $96,000.00

    “       “   “      “     “      “       7% January & July _ _ _ _ _  56,000.00

In the hands of the Govenor (sic) 7% Jan’y & July _ _ _ _ _ 90,202.17

                                                                                            $242,202.17

 

II. Terrell Endowment.

Bonds of the State of Georgia 7%s Janruary(sic) & July _ _$16,000.00

     “      “    “ Georgia R.R. and B. Co. 7% Jan’y & July _ _ _ _4000.00

                                                                                               $20,000.00

 

III.  General Fund.

Debt of the State of Ga. paying interest at 8% _ _ _ _ _ _ $100 000.00

Bonds “  “      “     “    “      “           “       “ 8% _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 3 000.00

    “     “   Ga. R. R. and B. Co. Jan’y & July 7% _ _ _ _ _ _ _5 000.00

    “     “   Clarke County _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  500.00

    “     “   the City of Athens _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _300.00

                                                                                           $108,800.00

 

 

 

Approved by

                        Joseph E. Brown

                        Martin J. Crawford

A. T. MacIntyre of the Committee

A. R. Lawton, absent.

 

                                                            Respectfully submitted,

                                                                        Benj. C. Yancey,

August Session 1879.                                                   Chairman.

 

Committee recommend that only $100.00 be hereafter allowed for music which was agreed to

                                                                                    Yancey.

                                                                                                Chairman

 

(158)

Report on Buildings.

The Report of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds, was taken up and adoped(sic), except so far as it also for appropriations varying from those already made.

It is as follows:

                        To the Honorable Board of Trustees.

The Committee on Buildings and Grounds reports that the Building known as Old-College is not in use except that one of the lower rooms has been fitted up by the young gentlemen connected with the University as a Reading Room, and two or three of the upper rooms have been occupied by Mr. Richardson and his family as a boarding house for students.

These buildings are in fair order.  The house & lot known as the Chancellor’s place has for several years past and up to the election of Chancellor Mell, been rented out and occupied by families keeping a considerable member of boarders.

This use of the premises has resulted in heavy damage requiring extraordinary repairs and the expenditure of a considerable amount of money.

The place is now occupied by Chancellor Mell and its condition and appearance are greatly improved.  It will however require about $250.00 to complete the necessary repairs on the dwelling and the fencing on, and around the lot.

The place occupied by Prof. Woodfin has been much neglected for several years past.  Having been rented out it was in very bad order and unfit for the use of his family without thorough repairs.  It has been put in good condition except the absolute need of painting.  This will cost about $100.00

The places occupied by Mrs. Ruff and Dr. Brumby the one as a boarding house the other as a private residence are in tollerable(sic) repair except the need of painting.  These together with the other dwellings on the campus will require for repairs from $200.00 to $300.00.

 

(159)

August 1879.

The Library Building cannot be longer neglected.  The pressure of other urgent demands has hither to postpone attention to this valuable property.  The wood cornice, tin conductors, &c. must be refitted before another winter.  It will cost about $150.00  The carpet on the floor of the Library room is so much worn and defaced as to be wholly unfit for larger use.  A new and appropriate covering for this floor of either carpeting, oilcloth, or linoleum will cost about $400.00  Linoleum combines the advantages of a carpet in deadening the foot fall and of oilcloth in not collecting dust, and admitting of being easily cleansed with wet cloths.  This room should also be supplied with new sittings, for the use of the Board of Trustees.  Three dozen chairs for this purpose will cost about $100.00  It will be seen that great safety to the Library in this building has been provided, by wise doors which being securely locked protect the books in the absence of the Librarian.  This valluable (sic) arrangement has cost a fraction over $300.00

The Chapel has recently been fitted up for the use of gas at a cost of $150.00 not yet paid as the work was not done in time to be included in the Treasurer’s accounts.  The sealing of this edifice is much decayed and the plaster cornice inside from falling off and being patched from time to time has become irregular and unsightly.  Both should be renewed and the building painted and white-washed.  It will cost $250.00 to complete these necessary repairs. The sittings in the body of the Chapel are neither convenient nor suitable to the place.  The manner in which the chairs are fastened down makes it estreemly (sic) difficult to cleanse the floor or keep the hall in order and your committee would ask for an appropriation to substitute these chairs with something

 

(160)

Report on Buildings.

better adapted to the purpose, but for the hope that it will not be long before the Board of Trustees will recognize the necessity of furnishing ampler accomidations(sic) for the friends of the University attending its Commencements and be able to afford the means for extending the western end of the chapel and making our entire rearrangement & improvement of the interior of the building.

The water supply on the Campus is still insufficient.  One of the wells was deepened last fall and has since yielded a sufficient quantity for ordinary uses, but the protracted drought has lessened the flow of water and it will probably become necessary to again deepen the well to insure a permanent supply.

The appropriations made at the last session for repairing the Halls of the Demosthenian & Phi Kappa Societies have been expended for that purpose.  The students have supplemented the appropriations made by the Board, so that both Halls have been thoroughly renervated (sic) and put in very handsome condition inside and out.

The College Campus has for years been exposed to the incursions of cattle and other stocks for the want of efficient gate-ways.  This want has been supplied by the erection of an automatic gate which opens and shuts by levers acted upon by the wheels of vehicles entering & leaving the grounds.  The cost of this gate was $35.00 besides the expense of its erection.

Pursuant to instructions given by the Board at its last session since improvements have been attempted on the grounds adjacent to the University buildings.  These improvements consist mainly in the removal of a large number of pine trees and other unsightly encumber-

 

(161)

August 1879.

ances from the ground - the setting out of some hundreds of our native forest trees - the grading & teracing (sic) of the space West of the Chapel and in the partial filling up of the depression in front of Moore College which has hither to so much marred the appearance of that section of the campus.  While the recent prolonged drought has not been favorable to the growth of the newly set trees, many of them have survived and add much to the appearance of the grounds - such as have died can be easily replaced in the fall.  This work done with strict regard to economy has cost less than $450.00

Your committee deem it very important that the improvements thus commenced should be carried forward.  The larger part of the heavy work has been done.  Some further filling up will be necessary.  Nearly one half of the iron fence in front of the Campus will have to be taken down, the ground graded and the fence reset & repaired, a proper system of drainage must be completed and some further expense incurred in the erection of gates or turn-stiles at he enterances (sic).  These items with some inconsiderable amount for the purchase of trees and shrubery (sic) constitute all that will be necessary to give a new and pleasing aspect to these long neglected grounds.  The work proposed will cost from five to seven hundred dollars.

It is most respectfully submitted whether the same amount could be more judiciously expended in the interest of the University.

                                                            Young L. G. Harris,

                                                                                    Chairman.

 

(162)

Report on Buildings.

The Board then took a recess to attend the Commencement exercises in the College Chapel; where the usual speaking was had, and degrees conferred by the Chancellor as already heretofore recorded, after which the Board repaired to the Library and resumed business.  Mr. Cooper Vice President was authorized to sign all the Minutes of this Board not heretofore signed.

Mr. Gresham Chairman of the Committee on Laws & Discipline moved that when the Board adjourned it adjourn to meet here next year on Friday before the third Wednesday in July at 10 o’clock A. M. and that that be the day of our annual stated meetings hereafter.

Mr. Cobb submitted the following paper,

Mrs. Waddell desires the Board of Trustees to act upon the following matters:

1st.  It is claimed that she is owing a ballance(sic) for rent of the home occupied by Prof. Waddell.  She claims that there are certain permanent improvements such as painting, putting up grates, repairs &c. that were put upon the house by Prof. Waddell and that ought to be deducted from the rent.

2nd.  She desires that some definite action be had as to what disposition shall be made of the cottage erected by Prof. Waddell upon the lands of the University by the consent of the Prudential Committee.

3rd.  It has been represented to Mrs. Waddell that certain books found in the library of Prof. Waddell at the time of his death belonged to the library of the University.  She requests that this matter be fully investigated and is of course anxious to have returned at once all books that are shown to belong to the College.  She further requests that some one be appointed in behalf of the College to make a thorough investigation of this matter.  Mrs. Waddell deems it due to herself to say that with the exception of a very few volumes which she knows belong to

 

 

 

 

 

 

(163)

August 1879.

the University and which will be at once returned she was not aware that any of the University library books were among hers or that any one claimed that there were any.

In reference to the first item above specified in relation to the rent due the University the Board agreed that the rent might be set off with the claims there in specified.

The second item was postponed for future consideration the Board being upon the eve of adjournment.  Mr. Cobb was appointed a committee under the third item above specified to investigate the question of books in Mrs. Waddells’ possession belonging to the College Library.

Mr. Brown acting for Mr. Vason laid on the table for the information of the Board the following paper to wit:

The undersigned in conformity with a resolution of Board Trustees has consumated (sic) the contract as Attorney for the State University with the Southwestern Agricultural College, located at Thomasville, Ga. by which each of said Corporations are made schools of said University in compliance with the terms and stipulations as contained in the action of the Board Trustees in accepting their several propositions.

The agreement of consumation(sic) has been duly executed to this University for the respective properties set forth in their application.  The titles to which are satisfactory and which when recorded in the office of the clerk of the Superior Courts of the Counties of Randolph and Thomas will be transmitted with the contract of consumation(sic) to the Secretary of this Board

Respectfully Yours,                   D. A. Vason, Committee & Atty.

                                    Athens, Ga. August 4th, 1879.

 

(164)

Standing Committees.

Committee on Finance.

                        Messrs. Yancey, Brown, Crawford, MacIntyre, and Lawton.

 

Committee on Library.

                        Messrs. Cobb, Hall, Davenport Jackson, Pierce, and Stephens.

 

Committee on Buildings.

                        Messrs. Harris, Seward, Vason, Barrow, and Mitchell.

 

Committee on Law Department.

                        Messrs. Cobb, James Jackson, Lawton, Toombs, MacIntyre, and Gordon.

 

Committee on Agriculture & Horticulture

                        Messrs. Yancey, Lewis, Barrow and Screven.

 

Committee on Apparatus.

                        The Members of the Prudential Committee.

 

Committee to visit North Ga. Agricultural College at Dahlonega.

                        Messrs. Colquitt, Johnson & Hammond.

 

Committee to audit Treasure’s accounts.

                        Messrs. Yancey, Harris, and Cobb.

 

Committee on Honorary Degrees.

                        Dr. Mell, Chancellor and Messrs. Harris and Hill

 

(165)

August 1879.

An official communication was received from Prof. David C. Barrow Jr. Esq. corresponding Secretary of the Alumni Society stating that Hon. Alexander H. Stephens was duly elected Alumni Trustee of the University of Georgia for the next four years beginning with Thursday the 7th day of August 1879.

 

The Board then adjourned sine die.

 

 

Wm. L. Mitchell

            Secretary.

                                                                                    Mark A. Cooper

                                                                                                Vice(?). President(?).

 

(166)

                                                            (Blank page.)

 

(167)

University of Georgia.

Athens, Ga. July 16th, 1880.

The Trustees of the University of Georgia met in stated annual session in the College Library at 10 o’clock A. M. the Vice-President Hon. Mark A. Cooper in the chair.

Upon calling the roll, the following Trustees were found to be present; Messrs. Cooper, Mitchell, Lewis, Toombs, Yancey, Vason, Jackson, Crawford, Billups, Hall, Barrow, Harris, MacIntyre, Speer and Stephens.

            An Act of the last General Assembly providing for four additional Trustees, who are to be practical farmers, was accepted by the Board as a part of the Charter of the University of Georgia, and the following gentlemen, duly elected by the State Agricultural Society and certified by the Secretary of that Society under the Seal of the Corporation, answered to their names, Hon. L. T. Livingston, of Newton County elected for four years; Col. Wm. H. Felton of Macon County, elected for three years; Hon. James H. Fannin, of Troup County, elected for two years; and Maj. S M. H. Byrd of Polk county, elected for one year.

Prayer was made by the Chancellor.

The minutes of the last stated annual meeting were read and confirmed.

a. Recorded at

    at pp.

    178-222 (left margin)

  1. Chancellor Mell read his Annual Communication, which was referred to the Committee on Laws and Discipline, with power in that Committee to distribute such portions of the Communication to other Standing Committees as more properly belong to them.  The Board then adjourned to 4 o’clock this afternoon, upon the motion of Mr. James Jackson.

 

College Library July 16th  4 o’clock P.M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Messrs. Gresham and Screven appeared and took their seats.

Excuses were made and sustained for the absence of the following Trustees:  Messrs. Miller, Pierce,

 

(168)

The Minutes of the 16th. and 17th.

Beckworth, and Seward.

Reports of Standing Committees were read and laid on the table for the present, to wit, An Abstract of the Minutes of the Prudential Committee accompanied with its Book of Minutes; the Report of the Committee on Apparatus; and the Report of the Building Committee.  On motion, Mr. Hall was appointed to write Mr. C. P. Crawford and Dr. W S. Dudley, President of the Middle Georgia Military and Agricultural College at Milledgeville, to appear before the Board, and make the annual Report of that Institution.

Upon the introduction of those gentlemen, Mr. C. P. Crawford submitted their Report accompanied with remarks by himself and Dr. Dudley, the President, which Report was laid on the table for the present.  The Report of the South west Georgia Agricultural College at Cuthbert sent by the post with a letter from Hon. Jus.(?) T. Clarke, President of its local Board, was read and laid on the table for the present.

            The Chair announced the Standing Committee on Laws & Discipline, Mr. James Jackson Chairman Messrs. Stephens, Toombs, Crawford, Vason, Harris, Fannin, and Gresham.

Mr. Young, Chairman of the Standing Committee on Finance, submitted his Report, which was laid on the Table for the present.

            The Board then adjourned to 10 o’clock tomorrow, on motion of Mr. Toombs.

 

                                                                                                Mark A. Cooper

V. Prt.(?)

 

(169)

July 1880.

                                                                        July 17th. 1880 10 o’clock A. M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

The minutes of yesterday were read & confirmed.

Messrs. Hill & Lawton appeared and took their seats. 

b.  Recorded

     on p. 223. (left margin)

b.  Mr. Yancey, Chairman of the Standing Committee of Agriculture and Horticulture submitted its report, which was received and adopted.

Mr. Gresham, Chairman of the Committee of two, to represent this Board in the reception of a donation from a friend of the University upon the terms specified in our Resolution adopted at our last stated annual meeting in August 1879 read his Report and the deed of gift specifying the limitations thereof, omiting (sic) the name of the donor in reading the Deed, because the Donor had insisted that his name should be withheld.

c.  Recorded

     on pp.

     224-229. (left margin)

  1.  The Report was received and adopted; and it and the Deed with twenty Bonds of the Georgia Rail Road and Banking Company, bearing Six per cent interest with the coupons cut off, to July 1895, that is to say, that the first coupon not cut off is due and payable July 1st. 1895; were handed the Secretary and Treasurer.  Of these twenty Bonds, Eight will fall due July 1st. 1897, and Twelve will fall due Jany. 1st. 1910, and they are all payable in the City of Augusta.  Pending the Motion to adopt the Report, Mr. Crawford was called to the chair, and Mr. Cooper submitted a resolution to recommit the Report, and his resolution being voted down, he resumed the Chair, and

Recorded

on p. 230.

the Committee on Laws and Discipline submitted a Report, in which they        recommended the appointment of a Standing Committee on Branch Colleges; and make a distribution of the topics of the Chancellor’s annual Communication to the respective standing committee to which said topics properly belong, which Report was received and adopted.

 

(170)

The Minutes of the 17th and 19th.

On motion the following resolution was unanimously adopted.

            Resolved, that the sincere thanks of the Board are hereby expressed to the Donor of the Twenty Bonds of the Georgia Rail Road and Banking Company, amounting to $20,000.00 and that Mr. Gresham be requested to communicate the same to the Donor, with their assurance that his wishes in relation to divulging his name have been scrupulously observed by Mr. Gresham.

The South Georgia Agricultural College submitted its Report by Mr. A. P. Wright, President of the Local Board with remarks by himself & Mr. MacIntyre of this Board; and the North Georgia College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts distributed to the members of the Board its annual Report in a printed pamphlet.  These two documents were received and referred to the Standing Committee on Branch Colleges, just provided for, to which Committee, the Reports from Middle Georgia Military & Agricultural Colleges, to wit, Mr. Vason, Chairman, Messrs. Stephens, Lawton, Gresham, Toombs, Crawford, Hull, and Fannin.

Mr. Mitchell read a paper advocating Free tuition in the University, and making suggestions as to its future expansion, which on his motion was referred to the consideration of the Committee on Laws & Discipline.

Messrs. Hall, and Billups were appointed the Committee of Invitation.

On motion of Mr. Stephens the Board then adjourned to 9 o’clock Monday morning.

 

                                                                                                Mark A. Cooper

                                                                                                        Vice. Pres.(?)

 

 

 

 

 

(171)

July 1880.

                                                                                    July 19th 1880.

The Board met according to adjournment.

The minutes of Saturday were read and confirmed.

Mr. Cobb appeared and took his seat, giving a satisfactory reason for his tardiness.

The Committee on Laws & Discipline reported on the Paper presented by Mr. Mitchell on Free tuition and expansion, and recommended that the consideration of the Paper be postponed.

The Report was adopted.

On motion of Mr. Lewis, the Paper was made the special order of the day for the second day of the next stated annual meeting of the Board.

Chancellor Mell in a letter invited the Trustees with their families and friends to a Reception on Wednesday next, at his residence, from 8 ½ P. M. to 12 o’clock.

On motion the invitation was accepted and the Secretary was instructed to advise Dr. & Mrs. Mell of its acceptance.

The Committee on Laws & Discipline reported

Recorded

on pp.

  230-231 (left margin)

on the Dormitory System & upon the reception of the Report, Mr. Toombs moved a substitute which was lost and the Report was adopted.  Mr. Harris presented a Memorial from one of the Five Companies of the City asking leave to erect a building on some part of the College Campus which memorial was referred to the Committee on Buildings.

The abstract of the Minutes of the Prudential Committee was called up and on motion of Mr. Yancey referred to the Committee on Laws & Discipline.

Mr. Lewis presented a memorial from the Phi Kappa Society on the subject of a Society Day, which memorial on motion of Mr. Stephens was referred to the Committee on Laws & Discipline.

 

(172)

The Minutes of the 19th, and 20th.

The Board then took a recess to attend the Sophomore exhibition in the College Chapel & at its close returned to the Library.

On motion the Board adjourned till after the Literary address to be delived(sic) this afternoon on the College Chapel before the Phi Kappa and Demosthenian Societies by Peter U. Meldrim, Esq. of Savannah.

                                                            July 19th 1880 P. M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Mr. Brown appeared and took his seat.

Mr. Stephens submitted resolutions looking to the sale of a part of our fifty acres of land in Thomasville for the benefit of the South Georgia Agricultural College and moved to free the blank with twenty acres of the fifty acres, which was agreed to and the resolutions were there referred to the Committee on Branch Colleges.  The Board then adjourned to meet tomorrow morning at 9 o’clock.

                                                                                    Mark A. Cooper

 

 

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July 1880.

                                                                        July 20th, 1880.

The Board met according to adjournment.

The Minutes of Yesterday were read and confirmed.

Recorded

on p. 231. (left margin)

Mr. Harris submitted Resolutions in relation to a garden for the tenant of the Old College; in relation to entering on our minutes the names of such persons as are proposed for Honorary Degrees a year in advance of Action by the Board; and in relation to fitting up a place for the museum and the sum of $700. was appropriated for the purpose, all three of which were adopted.

On motion of Mr. Brown, the Prudential Committee was instructed to persevere in its efforts to secure a permanent supply of water on the Campus, & the sum of Three hundred dollars was appropriated for that purpose.

The Committee on Laws and Discipline made a Report on the Phi-Kappa Memorial which was received; and a motion made to adopt the Report, and pending that motion, Mr. Stephens moved to amend the Report by making Thursday Commencement day, & Wednesday Society day, and the amendment was adopted.

Other amendments were then suggested, and pending their discussion, the Board took a recess to attend the Junior Exhibition in the chapel.  After the Exhibition, the Board returned to the Library, and on motion of Mr. Vason, adjourned till after the Alumni Oration by Capt. Henry Jackson of Atlanta at 5 ½ o’clock P. M.

 

                                                                                    July 20th 1880 P. M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Mr. Hammond appeared and took his seat.

The Report of the Committee on Laws & Discipline being the business before the Board, was proceeded with, and the various amendments heretofore suggested, together with others, were

 

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The Minutes of the 20th and 21st.

discussed at some length, when on Motion of Mr. Toombs, seconded by Mr. Gresham, the whole subject was indefinitely post-poned by a vote of 11. to 9. upon a call for a division.

Recorded

on pp.

232-233. (left margin)

The Committee on Laws and Discipline reported on the proposed connection between the Chair of Chemistry and the State’s Department of Agriculture, touching the analysis of Fertilizers, recommending the connection upon proper terms and the Report was received and adopted.

The Committee on Branch Colleges made a Report, which was received, and on a motion to adopt, amendments were proposed, and pending the discussion, night having approached, on motion of Mr. Toombs, the Board adjourned to 9 o’clock tomorrow morning.

                                                                                                Mark A. Cooper

                                                                                                          V. P.

 

(175)

July 1880.

                                                                                    July 21st, 1880.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Recorded

on p. 247. (left margin)

Mr. Harris in behalf of the Committee on Honorary Degrees, submitted a Report making it a rule in the future that the names of all persons proposed for such Degrees and which has(?) over(?) one(?) year(?) be entered in the minutes of the Board by the Secretary, which was adopted.

Mr. Harris, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings, submitted a Report to the effect that the Hook and Ladder Company have permission to erect a Building for their use on the Campus, which was received, and on a motion to adopt the Report, a debate sprang up, and after discussion, Mr. James Jackson, moved to post-pone indefinitely, which motion prevailed, & the Report was in that way disposed of.

Excuse was made for the absence of Mr. A. Johnson and sustained.

Mr. Toombs moved that the several persons recommended for Degrees by the Faculty and whose names and Degrees are specified in the Chancellor’s annual communication and Supplemental communication are entitled to the same and that the Chancellor is hereby instructed to confer the same publicly in the College Chapel to-day.  The Board look up the Report of the Committee on Branch Colleges, and on a motion to adopt, Mr. Brown proposed, to amend by providing to pay them the ballance(sic) of the appropriation of $2000.00 not yet paid.

This proposed amendment after discussion was lost.

On motion, the proposition to pay the Chancellor and Committee men appointed to visit the Branch Colleges and the General Assembly, was stricken out, except the Chancellor, whose expenses are to be paid.

Mr. Harris reported on behalf of the Committee on Honorary Degrees which was recommitted and adopted. (?) (In the left margin of the page.)

 

(176)

The Minutes of the 21st.

Recorded

on pp.

233-236. (left margin)

The Report as amended was then adopted.

Messrs. Hammond and Fannin were appointed a Committee to express the thanks of the Board to Mr. Stephens for the fine Portrait of himself now suspended in the Library.

The Several Presidents of the Branch Colleges are considered to hold their appointments till the action of the Board shall otherwise determine.

The Chair by direction of the Board appointed the Committee of five to represent the interests of the University before the Legislature to wit:

Messrs. Toombs, Brown, Byrd, MacIntyre and Vason.

Recorded

on pp.

236-239. (left margin)

On motion of Mr. Yancey, chairman of the Committee on Finance, their Report was taken up & adopted.  Mr. Hill, resigned as Professor of Constitutional Law.

Recorded

on p. 240. (left margin)

Mr. Cobb, chairman of the Committee on the Law Department, reported in favor of filling the two vacancies in the Law School, with Pope Barrow Geo.(?) D. Thomas Esquires, and the Report was unanimously adopted.

Recorded

on p. 240. (left margin)

Mr. Yancey submitted a Resolution empowering the Auditing Committee to instruct the Treasurer to invest supplies funds which was adopted. Mr. James Jackson submitted the following Paper which was agreed to,

                                                            “If, in the judgement of the Faculty, a Student applying for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts at his graduation, has been faithful in the attention to all the departments necessary to the Degree and has made an average on all the combined marks in those departments equal to that required in any one of them, he shall be entitled to a Diploma.”

The Board then took a recess and repaired in procession with the Faculty and students to the Chapel, preceded by the high sheriff of the County,

 

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July 1880.

with music by Burns’ Silver Cornet Band, and witnessed the Commencement exercises and the conferring the Degrees by the Chancellor as ordered by the Board, after which the Board returned to the Library and completed its business.

Recorded

on pp.

240-243. (left margin)

Mr. Harris Chairman of the Committee on Buildings called up his annual Report which was adopted.  Mr. Harris moved that the valuation made by Messrs. Phinizy and Thomas, of the Houses of Professors be recommitted to those gentlemen with the request of the Board that they include in their valuation the value of the land annexed to each residence, that being the Board’s meaning, and that 4 per cent be assessed as the rent of this year 1880, upon that valuation thus increased, and after this year 1880, the Prudential Committee be instructed to put such greater per-cent upon the said valuation as will cover ordinary expenses of repairs.

Recorded

On pp.

243-247. (left margin)

Mr. Mitchell Chairman of the Committee on Apparatus, called up the Annual Report upon Apparatus, and the same on motion was adopted.

The disposition of the cottage erected by Prof. Waddell on the lot occupied by him was turned over to the Prudential Committee with power to act.

The sum of twenty five dollars was appropriated to Henry B. Mitchell, Esqr. for the Picture prepaired(sic) by him for Prof. Wm. M. Brown to stimulate an enthusiasm in the class studying systematic Botany, illustrating the motto, selected by the Professor from the sermon on the mount, “Consider the lilies of the Field, how they grow.”

The Chair then announced the visiting Committee to the Branch Colleges for next year to wit:  To the Branch College at Milledgeville, (? Page torn).

 

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

Messrs. Miller, Felton, Hall and Gordon.

To the Branch College at Cuthbert,

Messrs. Crawford, Byrd, Gresham, and MacIntyre.

To the Branch College at Thomasville,

Messrs. Billups, Fannin, Brown, and Beckwith.

To the Branch College at Dahlonega,

Messrs. Lawton, Johnson, Livingstone and Colquitt.

The Chair also appointed the usual standing Committee for the ensuing year, to wit:

Committee on Finance.

Messrs. Yancey, Brown, Crawford, MacIntyre, Lawton and Fannin.

Committee on Library.

Messrs. Cobb, Hall, Davenport Jackson, Pierce, Stephens and Felton.

Committee on Buildings.

Messrs. Harris, Seward, Vason, Barrow, Mitchell and Byrd.

Committee on Agriculture & Horticulture.

Messrs. Yancey, Lewis, Barrow, Screven and Livingstone.

Committee on Law Department.

Messrs. Cobb, James Jackson, Lawton, Toombs, MacIntyre and Gordon.

Committee on Apparatus.

Messrs. Mitchell, Harris, Yancey, Cobb, Speer, and Barrow.

The Board then adjourned sine die.

 

See minutes                                                                              University of Georgia.

p. 167. (left margin)                                                                              July 16th 1880.

To the Board of Trustees,

                                    University of Georgia,

                                                                        Gentlemen,

                                                                                    I have the honor to present to you my Report of the present condition of the University and of its history for the past year.

Branch Colleges.

In the organization of Branch Colleges last year

 

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July 1880.

you imposed a duty on me in the following words:  The curriculum of study is to be prescribed by the Chancellor of the University, after conference with the Presidents of said Colleges.”

The Presidents of those Institutions, severally, after conference, agreed with me that they should conduct students in the regular college course no further than to the end of the Sophomore year.  In the case of those though who may have no ability or intention to go on to graduation, but who may desire to qualify themselves for a particular business, or, for any reason, may desire to make themselves acquainted with any topic.  I admitted that those Institutions are at liberty to teach such students any thing they please.

The Curriculum furnished by Pres. Scott of South Georgia Agricultural College, Thomasville, was approved by me Sept. 1st. 1879. -

- that by Pres. Sanford of South Western Georgia Agricultural College Cuthbert on Sept. 9th. 1879. - and that by Pres. Dudley of Middle Georgia Military and Agricultural College, Milledgeville, on Feby. 8th. 1880.

These Curricula are on file in the Chancellor’s office and can be inspected by you, if you desire.  These Institutions all sprang immediately into magnificent success.

The College at Thomasville, reports one hundred and Seventy (170) pupils in attendance during the year, all males.  Of these there are of College grade, in the Sophomore Class, five (5) and in the Freshman fifteen (15).  Total of College grade Twenty (20),

The College at Cuthbert reports one hundred and Seventy eight (178) all males, Of these, there are of the College grade, Sophomores, Thirteen (13) and Freshman, Eight (8).  Total of College grade

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

Twenty one (21).

At Milledgeville, there have been in attendance three hundred and fifty one (351) - males, one hundred and sixty five (165) - females one hundred and eighty six (186).  Of these there are of the College grade, Sophomores five (5) Freshman, thirty six (36) Total of College grade, forty one (41.)

 

Number of Students.

In the Departments at Athens one hundred and fifty two (152) students have matriculated during the last collegiate year, viz:  in Franklin College, Eighty two (82) in the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, Sixty three (63) and in the Law School, Seven (7.)

We have then as the number of all those who have received instruction in all the Departments of the University during the current year.

In Franklin College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _82.

In State College of Agriculture & Mechanic Arts _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 63.

In Law Department _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  7.

Total in the Departments in Athens _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _152.

as against 149 reported last year.

In the Medical Department in Augusta _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 112

In North Ga. Agricultural College males 245}  Total 325

 “     “       “            “               “      females 80}

In South Ga. Agricultural College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  170

In South West Ga. Agricultural College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  178

In Middle Ga. Military & Agricultural College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   351

Total of those receiving instruction in all Departments             1288.

Of these there are of College Grade

In Department at Athens _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  152

 “          “          “  Augusta _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _112

 “          “          “  Dahlonega _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 47

 “          “          “  Thomasville _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 20

 “          “          “  Cuthbert _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  21

 “          “          “  Milledgeville _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _41

Total of College Grade in all the Departments _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  393.

 

 

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July 1880.

Excluding then the Law and Medical Departments, it will be seen that of the College grade there are undergraduates:

In the Departments at Athens _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 145

 “ all the four Branch Colleges _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  129

Total undergraduates of College grade _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  274

We have no reason to expect in the future large numbers of undergraduates in the Departments here, because,

  1. We have organized four Branch Colleges to be with our consent and approbation in some degree competitors.
  2. In all these Institutions, Tuition is free.

In addition the Agricultural College of Alabama, located just across our Western border offers gratuitous instruction to students from all parts of the world.

There last catalogue reports the names of thirty five (35) young men from Georgia.

 

Library.

Mr. J. H. Armstrong the Librarian continued in office until the completion of his contract with the Board to classify and label the books in the Library.

On the 17th of February 1880. he tendered his resignation which I accepted.

The work performed by Mr. Armstrong according to the terms of the contract, no doubt cost more than the Board anticipated.  I am satisfied though that he performed his duty honestly and faithfully.  I have the honor herewith to present to you his report.

On the 19th of February Prof. Wilcox accepted the position as Librarian and ever since has been discharging the duties of the office.

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

Medical Department.

It was my privilege on Commencement Day of the Medical Department to confer the Diploma of that Institution on Twenty five graduates.  There are gratifying signs of increased prosperity in this Department of the University.  Four more graduated and thirty five (35) more attended the lectures than were reported the previous year.

North Georgia Agricultural College.

It was my privilege to attend the closing exercises of the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega.  Soon after your adjournment last year I addressed to the President of the College and the President of the Local Board, each a communication, from which the following is an extract:  “The Trustees of the University of Georgia at their last session as you are probably aware, adopted a regulation on the following words, ‘The Chancellor shall attend the final examination at Dahlonega, and if he shall be satisfied from such examination that a young man there graduating has attained proficiency in all the studies required by the University of Georgia for a Bachelor’s Degree in any named Department, he shall be authorized to confer such Degree upon the student in the name of the University.’

The construction I put upon this is that I am to bear the same relation to the Faculty of the North Georgia Agricultural College when they are considering the question of the right of students to Degrees as I entertain to the Colleges of the University located here, while they are engaged in the decision of the same question.  Here the testimony of every Professor in his own Departmen is taken as final and conclusive.  So far as I am concerned, the same thing shall prevail at Dahlonega.  The gentlemen there I am proud to recognize as any colleagues, entitled to all

 

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July 1880.

the respect and consideration that belong to the members in the other Faculties of the University.  I am happy that the Trustees have placed it in my power to co-operate in promoting the interests of an Institution that has done so much for the cause of education in the mountain region and is competent to do so much more.  Please see that those studying for any Degree go through with the Curriculum prescribed for that Degree in the Catalogue of the University.”

Among the list of four names handed one for graduation was that of a young lady who had completed the prescribed course for the baccalaureate degree.  This furnished occasion for some embarrassment because (1) you had instructed one to confer the Degree on “a young man” attaining to proficiency: and (2) it might seem a misnomer to dub a female a bachelor.  But then a literal construction of the phrase, “a young man”, would have prevented me from conferring the Degree upon a married man, or a widower, or one of middle age, who may have been a student there.

But you yourselves permitted to graduate here a few years ago a middle aged man who had a wife and children; and a widower now pursuing his studies here expects to apply to you for a degree next year.  By “young man” then it is evident you do not mean to prescribe any limitations as to age, nor to exclude those possessing marital relations, and as to the misnomer it was just as apparent literally when you authorized a husband and father to be dubbed Bachelor - as it will be next year also, when you will doubtless authorize the title to be conferred upon a widower.  The fact is when you used the phrase “a young man”, you evidently meant an authorized student there.  But your honorable Body consented that the Local Board should organize a mixed school of males and females at Dahlonega; and

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

there have not been any restrictions and limitations placed upon our sex and not upon the other, nor any rights and privileges granted to the boys that are with held from the girls.

The girls and the boys are all alike students, of the College.  The baccalaureate in this case then suggests no idea of sex and simply indicates that the student has completed satisfactorily a prescribed course of study.  Influenced by such considerations as these I conferred the Degree of Bachelor of Arts on the accomplished young lady who had completed the prescribed course of study.  In this I did not suppose that I committed either you or myself to the propriety or expediency of co-education of the sexes in the University; for the Diploma delivered to the lady was not that of the University of Georgia, but the diploma exclusively of the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega.  Should this act of mine though meet your disapprobation it would be well for you formally to express yourself to that effect, so that the Chancellor in the future may consider himself instructed in the premises.

Should my construction of your Resolution last year and my action under it meet you approbation, the North Georgia Agricultural College has had accorded to it normal and harmonious relations with the University - such relations as are honorable and agreeable to it and useful to the whole system of which it is a part.

In the 3rd. Art. of contract with the Medical College of Georgia you agree that “the local Board and the Faculty shall determine the granting of Medical diplomas; and such diplomas shall be signed by the Chancellor and Medical Faculty, sealed with the seal of the University of Georgia, and delivered to the graduates in the City of Augusta.”  Following as nearly as possible the analogy of this and with the desire to place the North Georgia Agricultural College on the

 

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July 1880.

same basis with the other complete Colleges in our system it is on my suggestion fixed as a permanent arrangement, unless you object, that the Faculty shall recommend to the Local Board names of students for graduation, that the Board shall instruct the President of the College to make official report to the Chancellor of the names thus passed upon, and that that officer shall then in your name and by your authority confer the University Degree of Bachelor of Arts delivering as an attestation of it, the Diploma of the North Georgia Agricultural College.

Should this meet your approbation there will at least be secured harmony and uniformity.  All the Degrees will be University Degrees, conferred by your authority and direction and the diploma in every case will be the diploma not of the University but of the College in which the course of study has been satisfactorily completed.  The Department at Dahlonega has been in the last two years an efficient feeder to the Department here, and under the present arrangement it promises larger contributions in the future.

College Campus.

It will be seen that the Campus has greatly increased in symmetry and beauty during the last year also, under the skillful hand of Col. Young L. G. Harris of your Body.  Col. Harris is entitled to the profound thanks of the whole University community.  Should the Trustees be able to continue appropriations our grounds before many years will rival in beauty and attractiveness the famed parks of the country.

Nothing short of this should satisfy us.

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

On the subject of the

Museum.

Prof. White writes one as follows:

                                                Athens, Ga. June 24th. 1880

Dr. P. H. Mell,

            Chancellor,

                        Dear Sir:

                                    In anticipation of your usual annual Report to the Hon. Board of Trustees I take the liberty of calling your attention again to the condition of the museum of the University, respectfully asking that you take some recommendation in reference thereto to the Hon. Board.

The third floor of the Library Building is admirably suited to the purposes of a mineralogical and general museum, and with proper repairs and fittings, could be so arranged as to make our condition to receive and preserve articles of value, and furnish no facilities for exhibiting them properly to students or visitors.

The Ceiling has already partly fallen and is in great danger of complete destruction.  The walls are much soiled and should be cleaned & kalsomined (sic).  The few cases & tables in the rooms are unsuited to the needs of a museum and were not originally designed for such.

Prof. Charbonnier has very kindly made designs & estimates for fitting up the rooms in proper manner and informs me that the sum of seven hundred (700) dollars would be sufficient to replaster, kalsomine (sic) and paint the rooms, to replace the present partition by arches and pillars thus producing one superb room one hundred & twenty five (125) by fifty (50) feet, excellently lighted; to provide glass covered cases & shelving

 

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July 1880.

and all other arrangements necessary to preserve and exhibit our valuable collections.  I earnestly and respectfully beg that you will suggest to the Hon. Board of Trustees the propriety & the great desirability of making an appropriation to this end.  I am aware that the amount named is a large sum to ask of the treasury at this time, but I am fully of the opinion that the expenditure is a necessary one.  The mineralogical collection of the University already contains nearly six thousand (6000) specimens, and the number is increasing rapidly by gifts of especially Georgia minerals.  I have opportunities of acquiring specimens representative of all the mineral formations of the State.  There is, moreover, a collection now due the University of duplicate specimens collected during the Geological survey.  I am informed by the Commissioner of Agriculture that these will be forth-coming at an early day.  The Natural History collection embraces over three hundred (300) specimens, and the Geological and general collections are quite large.

The University is in a position to receive gifts from many sources of curious & valuable objects, I frequently receive letters asking for information in reference to such articles, with offers to donate or loan them to the University.  Some provision should be made for the reception and care of these.  With a great number of valuable specimens & curiosities, the University of Georgia has practically no cabinet or museum worthy of the name that is useful to students or attractive to visitors; or that offers inducements to the friends of the Institution to make donations of this character.  During the present session, for instance, among other specimens, I have received from an old student of the University, Prof. P. H. Mell Jr. of the Alabama State College, a very

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

interesting and valuable collection of Claiborne Fossils.  I have no place to exhibit them where they may instruct our students, as properly shown they are capable of doing.

When I assumed charge of my present chair in 1872 the cabinet was occupied by the chair of Engineering as a Drawing Room.  Subsequently it was occupied as a lecture Room by the Department of History and Political Science.  Under these circumstances but little opportunity was afforded me to protect the specimens.

After the building of the Moore College I arranged the collections and on the election of Dr. Little to the Chair of Natural History and Geology.  I turned them over to him in comparatively good order. Since Dr. Little’s retirement I have again arranged the specimens as best I can but have no facilities for exhibition.  I should be extremely glad if the Hon. Board of Trustees would be pleased to visit the present “Museum” and note its condition.  At the last annual meeting the recommendation was made by a Committee of the Board that Sixty (60) dollars be appropriated to the Museum.  The records do not show that the appropriation was made.  Even if it had been, Prof. Charbonnier the Inspector of Buildings, agreed with me that the amount was too small to justify even a beginning of the improvements deemed necessary.

Again I respectfully ask that you call the attention of the Hon. Board of Trustees to the matter of the Museum.  Should an appropriation be made, Prof. Charbonnier is willing and ready to carry out his designs for the improvement, and I shall have the utmost pleasure in arranging carefully and to the best advantage our specimens and collections.

                                                                                    Very respectfully yours,

 

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July 1880.

                                                                        (Signed)  H. C. White

                                                                                                Prof. Chem. And Geol.

Gallery of the Fine Arts

The Hall to which Prof. White refers could be filled up also as a Gallery of the Fine Arts.  If the University may not be very soon in a condition to purchase specimens of painting and sculpture, it may as in the past, receive contributions from munificent friends - provided it had a suitable place for their preservation and exhibition.  But there is one thing that can certainly be accomplished.  We can have in our Gallery a collection of the portraits of all who, have at any time been officially connected with the University.  Hon. Alexander H. Stephens of the Board, presented to the University this year a superbe(sic) picture of himself, admirable not only for its excellency as a work of art but on account also of the accuracy of its likeness.  This portrait is to us enhanced in value because it is the personal gift of the distinguished subject of it.  If the Trustees would all follow the example of Mr. Stephens and if surviving friends or descendants would be induced to present to the University the portraits of the Trustees deceased, we should not only be brought under great obligations, but there would be collected here the portraits of a large portion of the distinguished men that have illustrated Georgia in her whole history.

System of Government.

At your last annual session, just before adjournment, you passed a measure which you intended as a Dormitory System.  I knew nothing of this until your adjournment, and the dispersion of the great body of your members.  This system I did not attempt to carry

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

into effect.  I wished to deliver back to you the noble trust confided to me, with all its great interests appreciated in my hands: and I knew I did not have capacity enough to run the schedule marked out without wrecking every thing.  In this though, whatever may be the appearances.  I was not influenced by a desire to join issue with you, or to thwart you in your plans.

If I could have resigned, and been released immediately, I should have escaped the embarrassment in that way.  Shut up as I was though by the impossibilities that environed (sic) me, I pursued the only safe legal course, that was left me - one too that I was satisfied would ultimately meet your approbation - certainly that which accorded with my sense of obligation to you.  I might have technically and rapidly carried the law into effect, though I knew it would work nothing but disaster to all concerned.  I might have without professing to do so, neglected to carry the measure into effect with the idea that I could have impunity for at least a year, and with the hope that I might somehow escape a reckoning with you.  I might even have attempted to evade your legislation, by privately or otherwise, prompting parents and guardians to instruct me to relieve their sons and wards from the obligations of the Dormitories.  On the contrary, loyal to my obligations to you, I put all the members of your honorable body in notice of my intentions.  Acknowledging my responsibility to you, and knowing your jurisdiction and the way in which you could intervene, if so disposed.  I frankly furnished you the occasion to do so.  I should have been most happy to have met you in a called meeting, and to have promptly relieved you from all embarrassment growing out of confliction (sic) of opinions between us.

 

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July 1880

I am happy to know that the time has arrived when this question will be authoritatively and finally set at rest.  Amicably, courteously and deferentially I address myself to you as those who have the right ultimately to decide this question; and as those competent by character and attainment to decide it intelligently and wisely.  When you do arrive at such ultimate decision, you shall have all appropriate cooperation from me.  If the decision be such as to be consistent with my reason and my experience.  I shall cooperate with the Board by carrying out their views heartily - proud of the honor and the privilege.  If the conclusion arrived at may seem to be impracticable or impossible.  I shall cooperate with the by promptly and amicably getting out of the way.  In no event, shall there be, with my consent a conflict between me and the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia.  The action adopted by you on the 6th day of August last, refers not either by name or title to the Chancellor.  In the 2nd Item the Prudential Committee is named and instructed with reference to the repairing of certain buildings; in the last sentence “the Faculty are instructed to require [certain] students to room in the college Dormitories.”  Now it may be asked, why I should feel myself called on to take such ground on the subject as I did, when I had not been definitely referred to at all?

I answer,

  1. Whether right or wrong, all parties in the University and outside of it hold the Chancellor to a personal responsibility for discipline and order.  If the Faculty therefore had taken any action in the line of the instructions of the Trustees, that action would have to be carried out by the Chancellor as executive officer, and all

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

Responsibility for it by a voluntary assumption of it would have rested on him.  Foreseeing this, I hastened to put all parties on notice as to which would be imperative on me in the premises.

2.  Knowing in advance that all responsibility would at last rest on me and that I would encounter peril, no matter what might be my decision, I desired to shield my colleagues from all share in responsibility and danger.  For I knew how difficult it is to keep such a question as this exclusively in the forum of reason and candor.  It is so easy for misapprehension, or selfishness, or passion, to prevent it, that those officers who should be complicated with it would at least be placed in the chapter of accidents, if not in circumstances of great peril.

Knowing that I could not possibly escape this peril, and that I would any how, first or last have to speak out, I determined to do so at once, and put all on notice that I could not possibly carry the system into effect.  My colleagues then, Gentlemen, if any wrong has been done, are not to blame, because I gave them notice in advance, that I could not carry out my part of the system, even if they voted to undertake it, I told them as I tell you, that all responsibility in this matter rests on me.  Nor are the members of the Prudential Committee in any way compromised in this matter.  I am the only one you have to deal with; and solitary and alone.  I place myself with perfect confidence into the hands of the competent and just gentlemen who compose this Board.

As soon as I arrived at a definite conclusion as to what was my duty in the

 

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July 1880.

promises, I addressed to every member of the Board, through the Secretary, the following communication.

                                                                        University of Georgia

                                                                                    Athens, Aug. 9th. 1879.

Hon. Wm. L. Mitchell LL.D.

                        Sec. Brd. Tr. Un. Of Ga.

                                                                                                            Dear Sir,

                                                                                                                  On my personal application, two days after the adjournment of the Board of Trustees, you were kind enough to furnish me a copy of the action of that body on the subject of the method of discipline in the University as follows:

                                                            “After careful consideration, your committee recommend the following action:

  1. That the house on Lumpkin street be taken possession of, and be let rent free to some proper person who will take students as day boarders.
  2. That the Prudential Committee shall have both the College Dormitory buildings, thoroughly repaired and cleaned, and the students be required to occupy them, with the following exceptions:

1st.  All students residing in Athens.

2nd.  The members of the Senior Class who shall prefer to room in town.

3rd.  All students who shall bring the written request of their parents or guardians, asking that they be allowed to room in town.

With these exceptions, the Faculty are instructed to require other students to room in the College Dormitories.”

It distresses me to have to announce to you that it is morally impossible for me to comply with the above legislation.  Of course, in taking such extreme ground as this, I recognize that I can

 

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be justified only on the principle of invincible necessity - a necessity too that must be made apparent to you and the other members of the Board of Trustees - Before attempting to give my reasons however, let me relieve the subject from two irrelevances (sic).

First.  I do not propose to make any issues with the Board, or with any number of it.  I have the highest respect for that honorable body and for all the distinguished gentlemen who compose it.  They have never as a body, so far as I know, and believe, done me any intentional wrong or harm, but have on the contrary brought me under many and very great obligations.  They elected me first to a Professorship, and then again to the Chancellorship, without by being in either case a candidate for office - during all the twenty three years of my connection with them they have treated me with kindness and consideration; and their generosity towards me when I was disabled and well high dead with nervous prostration, has brought me under a debt of gratitude which I shall ever feel, and at all times & in all ways be proud to acknowledge.  There is no controversy between me and the Board of Trustees, as there are no just grounds of variance between me and any of the noble and distinguished citizens that compose it.  Let it be distinctly understood then that this is not an arraignment of the honorable Board of Trustees as a body, nor of any individuals that constitute it; but a respectful - perhaps I may say an imploring, though I hope, manly - appeal to the members to do what they can to rescue me and the University from the impossibilities that environ us.

Second.  This is no case of intentional disobedience of law.  I admit and maintain that the Trustees

 

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when assembled in an organized body, are the highest authority in the University, and that their enactments (sic), in their letter and in their spirit, must be obeyed by the Chancellor so long as he continues in office.  He may not disregard them:  he may not intentionally evade them.  True if laws enacted may seem to the Chancellor to be pernicious or impracticable, he may escape responsibility by resigning.  If the law making power, in that event should prefer the measure to the officer, it is under moral obligation to release him immediately: for it would be in violation of all right and propriety to attempt to force one to execute a law that, as in this case, is in violation of his reason, his experience and his conscience - that jeopardizes his reputation & that will certainly wreck his administration.

But it may be asked, why I did not when the Board was here, and why I do not now, relieve myself by resignation?

I answer, because I am and have been environed (sic) by impossibility.  On account of the extraordinary conception (if any at all) that the Board have of the relations the Chancellor & Faculty bear towards them while they are engaged in legislation, I did not know their adjournment.  Neither officially, nor unofficially, directly, nor indirectly, was I informed, or given reason to suspect, that the Board had such a proposition under consideration; for the measure adopted was altogether a different thing from that against which I had argued in my annual report.  This I had heard had been voted down:  and the rumor had reached me that the form of College Government which I had recommended, and for the last year administered, had been adopted by a majority of one; but I did

 

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not know that the vote had been reconsidered and the present plan substituted, until the Trustees had dispersed.  Had their action come to my notice in time, I should have tendered my resignation immediately, respectfully but peremptorily: for nothing could induce me to assume the responsibility of administering the present system.

But it may be asked again, why I do not resign now?  You, sir, can answer that question.  You will bear me witness that I offered the resignation to you, but you declined to receive it, on the ground that I could not be released now, since the law required me to give twelve months’ notice.

This is no attempt to disobey or evade law, but a recognition of the impossibilities that surround one, and a frank statement of them through you to the able, and distinguished and just individuals who compose the Board.  If an enemy had done it - if the hand of malignity, with consummate skill and malice aforethought had provided and disposed the obstructions, I could not have been more thoroughly hemmed in than I have been by the excellent gentlemen who have given me hitherto so much of kindness & confidence.  By their action they have placed me between the horns of an inexorable dilemma.

If I carry into effect their legislation, I inaugurate a system that will ruin the boys and young men, confided to me; that will bring disaster upon the University: and that will wreck my administration:  If I omit to carry their enactment into effect, I seem to be disobedient to law and discourteous to them, and by their failure to inform me of their action, previous to their adjournment, they have made it impossible for me by resignation, to extricate myself under the form of law.

 

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Let no one then uncandidly (sic) make appeal to prejudice by asserting or intimating that this is a determined attempt to disregard law, and to overthrow legitimate authority.

But what is there in the system that justifies me in taking such extreme ground?

First.  I object to the very essence and genius of the system.

  1. Because of the peril to which it subjects the moral character of the student.  It requires young men and boys to occupy large dormitories in large numbers with no officers or other influences to protect them or restrain them.  In this respect, it is a new thing, unlike the old and obsolete Dormitory System proper, and unlike anything that has been hitherto tried.  Young men may have been in some unfortunate localities, thoughtlessly permitted to assemble together in large numbers, in detached buildings, away from the constraining influences of home and of virtuous female society:  but never before, in the history of Colleges in all time, have unsophisticated boys been forced by wise and christian men to occupy such positions of peril.  In such dormitories organized vice would entrench itself, and hold high carnival - drunkeness (sic), & gambling, and licentiousness would there fix their permanent headquarters.  This is not the Dormitory System the Trustees voted to adopt a year ago, and against which I argued in my annual Report, but the result of a compromise intended to harmonize the members of the Board, and adopted at the very close of the session, as a substitute for a measure that they had carefully considered early in the session and by majority vote approved; and which for this purpose had been reconsidered.  It may have been very effective in reconciling the views and feelings of the members of the Board, but it will

 

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be very potent in working discord and distruction (sic) to the University community, if put into effect.

I beg again to call attention to the fact that this system is entirely different from that against which I argued, and which I promised to attempt to administer if the Trustees insisted on it - provided that they would supply for it the essential agencies.  The Board have not insisted on the plan referred to, but have adopted another.  Of course, then, my conditional promise falls with the condition on which it was suspended.  There is no longer any promise of mine to attempt on any condition to administer any kind of Dormitory System.

2.  I object again because the system furnishes occasions the least favorable to studiousness and advancement in scholarship.  These dormitories will be the places where the sensations will be found, and will furnish resorts at all hours for the idle and the vicious from all parts of the town.  Force compels the young men & boys to lodge there, but there is no government enthroned to protect them from encroachment and interruption.

Second.  I object not only to the genius of the system, but to its details also.

  1. An unwise and unjust distinction is made between students.  Some are under duress, while others are free - Some are forced to occupy the dormitories, others no more deserving are permitted to room where they please.  The boys whose parents have no confidence in the wisdom or discretion of the College authorities, are rewarded by being accorded the largest liberty, while those whose parents confide in us, are treated as if they are imbeciles or inferiors: and virtually punished for the misplaced confidence of parents or guardians.  The system then would give us two classes of students, the superior & the inferior -

 

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the free and those in duress.  Surely reason and justice would say, if we must have an enforced dormitory system, let it embrace every-body.

  1. Again, another strange anomaly is that the Senior class is excused from the operation of the system.  No officers are to room in the buildings with the boys to restrain them; and, to make it worse, no experienced student - one who has met with the difficulties and dangers to character, & mastered them - is required or expected to be present to exercise an influence over them.  The members of the Senior Class are morally acclimated, their characters are formed; and, if they were present, they might establish and maintain a correct and mature public opinion, that might assert some conservative power.  But here all college authority is withheld, and all, or nearly all, college conservative influence dismissed; and the inexperienced boys, sons of those who confide in me, are forced into those relations which promise good neither to morals nor to mind.

Finally.  The system promises in the matter of discipline and order, nothing but confusion & riot.  In the first place, the boys are forced into the buildings, but there is no power present there to govern them.  In the next place, if nature is in them, they will resent what will appear to them to be outrageous distinctions made between them and others; and the deterioration of character; which the system will produce in them, will be ready, in vicious ways, to lend aid to their resentment. These bring my views as to the character and inevitable tendencies of the system, my conscience (I say it, with profound respect) will not permit me, either actively or passively, to be a party to its inauguration here.

A weighty consideration, influencing gentlemen of the Board in their action, may have been that, under my system and in my hands, a large building, in

 

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which has been invested no small amount of money, would be shut up and useless.

This is a great mistake.  The system which I would administer needs all the buildings on the Campus.  We have a plan which will unify and utilize all the houses that we have.  I did not present it, or alude (sic) to it in my report, because motives of delicacy & prudence prompted me to wait until the Board had taken definite and final action on the “Dormitory System.” 

Hoping that it will be in your power to serve every member of the Board with a copy of this communication, I subscribe myself.

                                                           

                                                                        With Profound Respect,

                                                                                    Your Ob’t. Serv’t.

                                                                                                P. H. Mell.

                                                                        Chancellor Un. of Ga.

 

                                    On this communication, I would remark, 1.  It was not an appeal from the Board or an arraignment of them before any tribunal.  It was an appeal to them; and a respectful request that they would aid me to escape from the impossibilities that environed (sic) me.

  1.  It was not an intimation that the Board were incompetent or unfaithful in the premises.  The most competent and faithful are liable to fall into inadvertencies (sic); and I do not disparage but compliment the Board, when I venture to bring to them, not against them, a statement of any inadvertency (sic), with the confidence expressed or implied that they are competent by magnanimity, candor and wisdom, to correct it.
  2. It was not an attempt to induce the Board to recede from their position, and yield to any willfulness of mine.  It was a respectful request rather, that they should so arrange matters that I could deferentially carry into effect their expressed

 

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wishes, or loyally give way to another who can cordially & by conviction cooperate with them.

  1. Nor was this an attempt to establish a precedent of insubordination, so that I myself, or any successor of mine, may in the future, be encouraged to disregard or nullify any law of the Trustees.  By serving all the members of your honorable body with the notice contained in the above communication.  I thwarted myself, if I was desiring to establish a precedent of insubordination.

As your President could, on the application of any two members, call an extra meeting, I could have been most easily arrested, if such had been my scheme.  As you remained quiescent after my notification, it may be inferred that you were satisfied I was loyal to my obligations; and that I was not establishing a precedent insubordinate or dangerous.

  1. Finally, this was not a proposition and an attempt to substitute a system of my own - one originating solely with me - in place of one of (crossed out) the Trustees had considered and adopted.  The system I have administered is one the Trustees established, years ago, under Dr. Lipscomb’s administration.  If there is any thing original with me, it is not to be found in the system, but only in the method of its administration.

Let no prejudice or resentment be excited against me then in advance on the supposition that I have presumptuously and arbitrarily substituted something new and untried of my own in the place of the organism established by law.  This system was until recently the established and legal one.  The most that can be justly and plausibly alleged against me is that I have held on to it and kept it in existence after the Trustees abrogated & repealed it.  This, reduced to

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Its last analysis is the extent of my apparent offense, and this is the thing that calls for justification or reparation at my hands.

My plea, in justification is that, on the one hand, I could not run the schedule marked out for one without touching every thing; and on the other, I could not relieve myself, by resigning, for your rules held me here inexorably for twelve months.

Your honorable body will excuse me when I say candidly, but with profound respect, that the whole difficulty originated in the fact that you had never considered and answered the important question What relations do the Chancellor and Faculty bear to the Board of Trustees when that body is engaged in legislating - while it is making or modifying, organisms that compromise those officers, or affect the whole University in its discipline or scholarship?  I have been an observer here ever since the resignation of Dr. Church; and I have been satisfied that nearly all the bickerings and confusion experienced, have grown out of the fact that that question has not been solved to the satisfaction of all parties.  Certain it is, the present difficulty originates no where else.  Had the Board been governed by the correct answer to this question they would never have dispersed without giving me an opportunity to agree to administer the new system, or, be resignation, to free myself from its responsibility under the forms of law.  If all parties had thoroughly understood the proper answer to this question, and conformed themselves to it, the unhappy complication could not possibly have existed.  If there had not been a violation of this as yet unwritten law, I could not possibly have had an opportunity or pretext for pursuing

 

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a course during the last year, which though legal in my judgement may possibly have been annoying if not offensive to some of you, and the necessity for which has certainly been a source of great distress to me.  Some compensation for it all may be realized though, if the present state of things should furnish the occasion for you to consider & settle for your selves that important question.  You will not consider it impertinent in me if I as one of the parties in interest, should present to you deferentially my views on the subject.  I suppose that no one ought to hesitate to admit the truth of the two following propositions,

First.  The Trustees have the power & the right to make or modify organisms for the University according to their own sense of propriety & expediency.

Second.  The Chancellor has the right to determine, whether on the one hand he will make himself responsible for such organisms by volluntarily(sic) attempting to execute them, or, on the other, escape responsibility by tendering his resignation & getting out of the way.

These two propositions I suppose are exhaustive of the subject; for no one, certainly not I, will maintain that the Chancellor is justifiable for any reason in refusing or omitting to obey the law, or in making any attempt insideously (sic) to neutrelize (sic) or evade it.  Leaving out of view then this last & rejected supposition & promising to take it up really though not formally again permit me to invite your attention to the two propositions.

First.  The Trustees have the power & the Right to make or modify organisms for the University according to their own sense of propriety and expediency.

                                    This does not mean

  1. That comity & courtesy do not require them to consult the Faculty on the subject.

 

 

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It is highly just and appropriate for them to admit that the gentlemen having the culture & experience of those fit to be College officers are competent to give them enlightened views on questions with which their every day thought & experience make them familiar.

2.   This does not mean that there may not be some kinds of organism on which the Trustees may not be compelled to trust to the advise of the individual Professors in making or modifying them.

Take for instance, the details of a curriculum of study.  How many boards of Trustees are there competent without assistance to make out all the departments of a University of high grade?  This is no reflection on boards of Trustees.  The same question may be asked in reference to College Faculties and Professors.  Where is the individual Professor or Trustee that is so expert in all the Departments of learning as to be competent to subject every officer in University Faculties to an intelligent, a rigid and an exhaustive examination in those officers’ own departments or is willing without trepidation to submit to like examination at the hands of those officers with any hope of coming off without humiliation & disgrace?  There is no such man.  If there can be no competent Faculty or Board of Trustees excepting where every member of it is an expert, possessing exhaustive and accurate knowledge of all the principles & details of every department of liberal education & learning, then there can be no such competent bodies on earth, and never have been & never will be.

A College Professor is competent if he has a thorough knowledge of the department he occupies though he may have but a general acquaintance with other topics.  So a gentleman is competent

 

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to be a Trustee even though he may not be able to give intelligent instruction in any department of learning or stand an examination in any of the Arts and Sciences embraced in any of the University Curricula.

In making or modifying some organisms, Trustees may be compelled to call in outside assistance and having confidence in the men they have themselves elected to office, it may not be amiss - indeed it will be highly appropriate - for them to consult the Professors, both on principles & on details and give the most respectful consideration to their suggestions & recommendations.  But after all no body has a right authoritatively to make or modify organisms in the University but the Board of Trustees met in organized body.

Second.  The Chancellor has the right to decide whether on the one hand he will make himself responsible for such organisms by voluntarily attempting to execute them, or, on the other, escape responsibility by tendering his resignation and getting out of the way.

This proposition may, in the estimation of some, need illustration & proof.  I respectfully invite your attention to the following considerations;

  1. All parties, whether right or wrong, hold the Chancellor responsible for discipline & order. 

He is elected in the first place because the Trustees have confidence that he understands or is competent soon to make himself acquainted with the genius & methods of College existence; and that he is well versed or competent soon to make himself so in the theory & practice of College government.  He cannot then free himself from responsibility on the ground,

  1. That he did not have the adequate power to meet public expectations.

If the authorities intentional denied him any discretion & with held from him any necessary

 

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power, with the intention to use him as their blind instrument to carry out, not only principles, but their own methods & processes in detail then the public will hold him responsible for foolishly attempting an impossibility & for disgracefully consenting to be a mere figure-head, when reason & public opinion & the interests of University education require that he should be an efficient if not a potent factor in the University problem.

A competent Chancellor does not need any promptings (sic) in administering University organisms; & the public knowing this will not excuse his failure in administration, on the plea, either that he had received no prompting or that he had followed such as had lead to disaster.  A competent man needs no prompting & the public demand that Trustees deal with an incompetent one not by prompting but by removing him, on the charge pure & simple of incompetency.

(b.) Nor could this officer escape condemnation for failure on the ground that he could not command the needed cooperation of men & things, appointed & provided for such purpose.  He was elected in the beginning because he was believed to be in possession of administrative capacity - because the Trustees thought he had power & address in applying principles in the management of men.

He is the wrong man & he is in the wrong place if his character & resources are not such as to secure the cooperation of all whose assistance he needs.

The public therefore hold him responsible and refuse to admit the validity of the plea that he could not command the requisite assistance, when that assistance was avail-

 

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-able, provided he had power, & address adequate to command it.  If the resources are in his reach the public justly hold him accountable for not having used them, & thus secured success.

If he attempts that which he knew in advance to be impracticable, or impossible, the same tribunal condemns him for his folly as well as his wrong.

(c.) Nor will the public permit him to throw the responsibility of his deficiencies & failures on the Board of Trustees.  Indeed it would be impossible for him to do this.  In the first place that body is an impersonality, whose business is conducted with closed doors & whose proceedings are never published.  Nobody necessarily knows how the individuals voted on any subject, and there is no possible way to hold them individually accountable in the premises, nor to make them bear the whole weight of the Chancellor’s failure, on the ground that he acted under their instructions.  In the next place by volluntarily (sic) attempting to carry out the legislation of the Trustees affecting College government he makes himself responsible & he ought to be so held by all parties.  For he is under the laws of the Trustees, not as a slave by force, nor as a citizen, or a subject by the accident of birth & therefore compelled to submit to the law without redress or escape - since some form of civil society is liable to bear sway over every region of the earth.  He is a volluntary (sic) agent & all parties so esteem him.  He can decline to take the responsibility to administer what he considers to be wrong or impracticable laws or organisms and escape with dignity all responsibility under the forms of law, by resigning his position.  Whenever therefore he attempts to administer

 

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any organisms that he considers impracticable he does so volluntarily (sic) as a free man, competent to decline and therefore as responsible as though he had originated the organisms himself.

(d.) Nor is there any analogy between him and the executive of a state or nation.  These last have the right to exercise the veto power, or, in other ways to enter their public protest against wrong or impracticable laws.

A University Chancellor has not & should not have such prerogative or right.  His remedy in the case is to be found in resignation.  That is the only way in which he can free himself from responsibility.  But who ever heard of the governor of a state or the President of a republic who was driven to the necessity of resigning his office in order to escape the responsibility for executing an objectionable law passed by the legislative body?  Or what officer of the kind could take this step for this reason, without subjecting himself to ridicule?  Why is this?  One reason is that the executive of a state holds office according to constitutional or legal provision, for a time designated by law & not liable to be removed from office by his constituents or by the legislative body simply because they are disappointed in him or displeased with him.  He has independent & vested rights according to law & he is under no obligations therefore to retire from office simply because he disagrees with those whose right it is to make the laws which it is his duty to execute.  Another reason is that as already said he can enter legally his public protest against the law & thus free himself from all responsibility.  Another reason still why he is in no danger of being involved in any respon-

 

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-sibility for pernicious laws is that he executes those laws not directly himself but through subordinate officers, many of them far removed from him, & out of his sight.  No body is in danger of confounding these remote & subordinate law-executors with the law-makers & of saddling any responsibility on them for the foolish or iniquitous enactment, such Executive may therefore rigidly enforce wrong or impracticable organisms or laws with the intention to expose their character & thus secure their abrogation or repeal.  Not so however with a Chancellor of a University.  He has no legal tenure of office as to time.  He cannot act independently of the Board of Trustees & retain his office as if he had a vested right in it, in spite of their disagreement with him.

If in a case of hopeless disagreement his now self respect and sense of duty do not prompt him to tender his resignation there is adequate power in the Board to oust him immediately.  Besides he has no legal way while he holds office to make public protest against what he may consider unwise or viscious (sic) legislation by the Board & no subordinate officers intervene between him and the subjects of the vicious law.  He comes directly in contact with those subjects & in person administers the law.  Should he then with his possitions (sic) and relations attempt to make wrong or impracticable laws odious by enforcing them he may succeed in the attempt, but his success will be much more signal in wrecking himself & his administration & damaging the important interests committed to his charge.  It is true & it is proper that it should be so, the public hold the Chancellor responsible for all organisms & laws he volluntarily(sic) consents to administer & execute.  All therefore ought to admit that he has a right to decide on the one hand whether he

 

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will take the responsibility to carry into effect the enactments (sic) of the Trustees or on the other escape such responsibilities under the forms of law by retiring from the official position he holds.

2.         There is another consideration of no little weight in this connection.  I do not hesitate to present it from any fear that I may be charged with overstepping the bounds of modesty, because:  1st. I am discussing the subject now impersonally and abstractly; and 2nd. because, I was no candidate for the office, and was taken by surprise when it was offered to me; and, by declining at first, and accepting at last reluctently (sic), I intimated doubts at least of my consciously possessing the adequate qualifications.

The gentleman occupying the place of Chancellor, if competent, has his own well defined philosophy of the theory and the practice of College government.  It is his business.  He has made it a matter of study and of daily observation and experiment; and, of course, all other things being equal, ought to know more about it than those who, far away from its cares & responsibilities, speculate profoundly perhaps on it in their libraries and other places of study; or dream cassually (sic) and cursorily about it, in the intervals of other, foreign, and pressing engagements.  It is due to the University and to him that he should have the right and the opportunity to resign, & thus legally decline to attempt to carry out any system other than the one he approves - to the University, because it is entitled at his hand to the last service he can render; to himself, because his own sense of accountability, and his reputation, are involved.

Take for example, the case before me.  I am convinced from theory & long experience, that that form of College government is more effective both for securing order & for devellopment (sic) of student character, which relies chiefly upon influence rather than upon authority.

 

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I will bring myself into harmony with the great principles of human nature in general, & the individual peculiarities in particular, and by binding to myself the noblest principles of human character I would so act upon the members of the College community as to make them govern themselves according to proper principles & for the attainment of my individual purposes & ends.  Last commencement I gave you in detail my theory and philosophy of college government, & during the last two years I have furnished a specimen of its operation in practice.  Now suppose that I should consent to throw this away and take & administer instead the Dormitory System with a genius & qualities the very reverse of that I prefer.  In that case I would be volluntarily (sic) consenting to throw away in my opinion the good for the bad and to administer a system that would establish antagonisms; that would produce permanent discord; that would operate on the baser principles of human nature in students - cultivating and developing their malignant characteristics; and that would make discipline & order impossible.  True, a Chancellor may, in excess of deference, consent as I did last year, to attempt to administer the Dormitory System if the Trustees insisted on it and if they would properly equip it with the necessary details.

But in doing so he would deserve commendation only for his deference.  His discretion & his sense of obligation to the University and to himself would be sadly at fault.  Fortunately for me the Trustees did not take me at my word and I have escaped the risk to the University and to my own reputation.  If these principles be true it is evident that it is due to the Chancellor that in some way there may be afforded him adequate opportunity to know in time the legislation of the Trustees, so that he may be able to decide whether he will assume responsibility or escape it under the forms of law by tendering

 

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his resignation.  Were he a soldier it would be sufficient for him to receive the written or other authentic orders of his superiors.  There is no chance for a soldier to resign, at least in the midst of the conflict; & he cannot escape the obligation to undertake an expedition ordered on the pretext that the undertaking compromised his reputation or imperiled his own life, or the lives of those under his command.  A soldier has but one paramount duty & that is to obey.  But soldiers & voluntary agents are different persons.  Orders in the sense of peremptory commands are never legitimately addressed to the latter class.  If they receive any instructions or directions, or orders - if you prefer the word - that are in their opinion wrong or impracticable, they are under no obligation moral or legal to obey them.  In perfect consistency with every kind of obligation they can escape responsibility by resigning their place or dissolving their relations with the contracting parties on the other side. 

Surely, that privilege can not reasonably be denied to the Chancellor of a University which is universally accorded to all other persons in the class of voluntary agents.

Let me illustrate this very naturally & appositely by the case of a Railroad employee.  The President or Superintendent or other proper officer gives instructions for a passenger train to be made up - specifying the locomotive to be attached to it.  This engine he assigns to a certain engineer, in the absence of the latter & leaves him written or adequate verbal instructions and then retires from his Railroad office & goes to his residence near by.  The engineer arrives at the yard and understands his instructions.  On examination he finds the engine a dangerous machine & is thoroughly convinced that it is likely to blow up, to

 

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the distinction of property and of life.  Is he under obligations blindly to obey orders?  He is firmly convinced that if the train moves under his control his own life and the lives of the passengers are at stake.  Is he not at liberty to pay heed to the dictates of duty to them & to the suggestions of the instinct of self preservation?  Has he no remedy consistent with both his moral & legal obligations?  Most assuredly he has.  Using that remedy, he promptly & courteously communicates his convictions and determinations to the officer that issued the instructions - and this too, in time for all the necessary arrangements to be made to move the train according to the schedule.  Now that officer may respond to the anouncement (sic) made by taking steps to secure the departure of the train or he may let it remain where it is in default of any action in the premises.  Should he come to the car shed promptly on the receipt of the respectful notice from his subordinate, he may in the plentitude of irresponsible power or in the heat of imperious passion summarily dismiss the hesitating officer, or with a spirit more conciliatory but yet not the less firm & determined, he may overrule or refuse to consider the officers scruples or the grounds of his apprehensions and peremptorily insist that he take the train out on schedule time as it is.  In the latter event is there no way for the engineer to escape in consistency with his moral & legal obligations?  Every body knows that he could then & there resign his position as engineer, & he would be guilty of wrong neither to God nor man.  But suppose the officer receiving the notice fully understanding it and having time to respond to it remained away from the R. R. premises; issued no order; sent no messages and did nothing at all in the premises; while it was easily in his power to do any or all of these; what

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

would be the natural - indeed the necessary inference?  Would it not be that he had given his tasit (sic) consent for the train to remain unmoved?  Could he come then the next day with a charge against the engineer of insubordination & of disregard to law?

Now I ask why does not this illustration faithfully represent my case?  A University schedule was formed for me by the Board of Trustees and the Honorable body adjourned & its members dispersed before I knew any thing about it.  That schedule I was sure I did not have capacity enough to run without wrecking every thing and I could not resign & thus relieve myself because the conditions of my engagement with the Board required that I should give twelve months notice.  In my then embarrassment, there were four courses open to me - two legal & two illegal.  Acting illegally I might have torn myself away violently at once & in disregard of my obligation to give twelve months notice; or I might have omitted all intimation of my intention during the vacation and then at the opening of the term, silently ignored the legislation of the Trustees without professing to do so - or if that was impracticable I might have boldly set the law aside on the plea of invincible necessity.  Acting legally, I might have gone on stolidly carrying into effect the law, when I knew I would wreck everything; or I might have availed myself of that provision of law which authorized an extra meeting of the Board to be called by its President on the application of two of its members.  This last I did.  I adopted this course because it was legal; and because it was that which made it impossible for me to attempt to userpe (sic) any power or prerogative which pertained to the Trustees.  Like the R. R. man

 

(215)

July 1880.

who furnishes my illustration I frankly and differentially appealed to my principals & stated to them the impossibility that beset one & the course I should necessarily be compelled to pursue, unless they used the lawful power I invoked.  This I did six weeks before the opening of the term with the intention & the hope, that they would intervene in time.  Very much to my disappointment & regret they omitted to do so and there was nothing left for one to do but to continue to run the schedule that has been in existence here for a dozen years or more and which they themselves ordained, but which in their last meeting they abrogated & withdrew.

I stand before you then gentlemen as one unfortunate indeed, because perhaps of the want of courage and skill to run the schedule you marked out for me - unfortunate again because you failed to give me in time the information I was entitled to, and for the want of which I have been placed in the midst of embarrassments & impossibilities - but I stand before you as well as one not denying but recognizing and maintaining your suppremacy (sic) and prerogative; but standing only upon that fragment of law which is all your strange reserve and reticence have left for one.

I had other sights in the premises but the only one I endeavoured (sic) to claim was the right to resign.  If I had been a slave or a subject I should have been compelled to submit to the law; if I had been a soldier it would have been my duty to obey it as an order; if I had been a Executive of a State or nation it would have been imperative on me to enforce it as an enactment.  But I was not any of these.  I was a voluntary agent responsible for everything I voluntarily consented to carry into effect and competent to escape responsibility by resignation.

 

(216)

Chancellor’s Report.

Again I repeat the whole difficulty originated in the fact that you have not formally considered an (sic) answered the important question viz: What relation does the Chancellor sustain to your Hon. Body while you are engaged in making or modifying organisms in the University that compromise that officer by affecting the discipline of the Institution?  Acting with the same differential freedom from reserve which has characterized me in the preperation (sic) of the other parts of this paper I have no hesitation in stating to you frankly what I consider to be properly my claims in the premises.

  1. The Chancellor has not, nor should he have, any veto power, either absolute or qualified; nor should it be his privilege, by protest or appeal, to arraign the Board of Trustees before the public or any other tribunal.
  2. The Chancellor has not, and should not have, any right to vote.  Even if this power were injudiciously conferred upon him, he ought to be too wise a man to consent to exercise it. 

He cannot attain to complete success, unless he has the confidence and sympathy of the members of the Board of Trustees; and it would be very foolish for him by his vote to attach himself to one or another of the parties among which the Board like any other deliberative body, is liable to be divided.

  1. He has not, & should not have, any jurisdiction over matters of finance.  In his formal written communications to the Board, he may make recommendations touching the appropriation & disbursement of money; but if the Board decline to carry into effect his recommendations, no wrong has been done him, or disrespect shown him, and he has no right to complain.

 

(217)

July 1880.

  1. But, when the Board are engaged in making or modifying organisms that compromise the Chancellor by affecting the discipline of the University. I claim that that officer shall have the right to be present, to hear what is said for or against the pending measure; that, before the Board proceed to vote on it, they permit him to address them; and if they should decide contrary to his convictions, that he be informed of the result before their adjournment, that he may have the opportunity to decide whether he will waive his objections and undertake the responsibility of carrying the measure out, or, by resignation, escape at once all responsibility to himself or embarrassment to the Board.

There are many ways in which these claims of the Chancellor may be met.  One very simple one is to make him ex officio, a member of the Board with the right to speak but not to vote.

Does any one object that in the above I magnify the office of the Chancellor?  If so, I reply,

  1. I charge that officer with accountability and overwhelming responsibility all the way along.
  2. As to rights and powers; I claim for him only three rights (1) that he should know in time what measures the Trustees have before them which are likely either directly or indirectly to affect him; (2) that he shall have the privilege to be heard on those measures before the Trustees vote on them; and (3) in the event that the decision should be contrary to his convictions, that the information should be imparted to him before the Board adjourn and disperse.  And the only power I claim for him is the power to resign.
  3. College Presidents & Chancellors though would no doubt, chide me for conceding too much to Boards of Trustees, and claiming too little for Presiding Officers and Faculties.  In a “Conference of College Presidents and Delegates”, held in Columbus, Ohio Dec. 27th 1877.

 

(218)

Chancellor’s Report.

“President Orton offered the following as his report on ‘The governing powers of Universities and Colleges’: Your committeeman appointed on the governing powers of the University beg leave to report that a very suggestive paper on this subject has been put into his hands by Pres. Jno. Bascom of Wisconsin; but that in default of time for the careful consideration by the conference of the questions involved he is not prepared to recommend for adoption any definite action beyond the following points viz:

  1. The internal management of the University or College including the conditions of enterence (sic), the course of study, & the discipline should be intrusted to the College Faculty; and that for its administration of the Institution the Faculty should cheerfully recognize its responsibility to the Regents or Trustees.
  2. The President of the Institution as the representative of the Faculty should in all cases be entitled to a seat if not a voice in the Board of Regents or Trustees.”

4.  In the most successful and distinguished Universities & Colleges in the United States the Presidents or Chancellors are ex officio, full members entitled to vote and speak; & in some by virtue of their offices they are Presidents also of the Boards of Trustees.  The Presidents of Yale College, of Harvard University, and of Amherst College are Presidents also of their respective Boards of Trustees, and in Yale & Columbia College New York City a member of the Faculty in addition to the President is a member of the Board.

In the College of New Jersey (Princeton) in the absence of the Governor the President of the College is the Pres. of the Board.

The following Institutions give full membership

 

(219)

July 1880.

to their Presidents viz: Columbia Coll. N. York City, University of California, Univ. of Minesota (sic), Univ. of Iowa, Louisiana State Univ., State Ag. Coll. Of Michigan, S. W. Presbyterian Univ., Emory Coll. of Ga., and many others whose catalogues are not now in my reach.  But so far as I know and believe this rule prevailes (sic) in all or nearly all the successful Colleges & Universities in the United States.

These may all chide me for surrendering rather than magnifying the rights & perogatives of the Chancellor.  Personally I have no desire to be a member of the Board and would prefer some other solution of the difficulty.

Since sewing the members of the Trustees with the printed extract from my Report my immediate predecessor Dr. Tucker has given in his paper an opinion of the Dormitory System in entire accord with my own, a few sentences from which I beg leave to quote here.  In the “Christian Index” of June 17th, 1880, he is giving an account of his visit to the University of North Carolina and some details in reference to that Institution.  I quote: The students “board where they please in the village but are all required to lodge in the College Dormitories - a plan which we think is the worst of all possible plans injurious alike to manners, to morals, & to habits of study.  If any thing could possibly destroy a College, this could do it.”

I beg leave also to quote from a private letter addressed to me by Col. W. Leroy Brown formerly of this University and now of Vanderbilt.

I had sent him a copy of my article from “Barnard’s Journal of Education” on “College government.”  In a letter dated March 27th, 1880 he says, “Please accept thanks for a copy of your article on College government which I have read with pleasure.  I fully agree with all you say

 

(220)

Chancellor’s Report.

In regard to the true theory of Collegiate Discipline and with the objections you present to the Dormitory System. * * * * * * *  Our method of discipline [at Vanderbilt University] is just what you advocate and the result is most happy.  I only say this in confermation(sic) of the correctness of your views.  Educators everywhere who have had opportunities of comparing the two systems of government would regard it an evil of no small magnitude to subject the youth to the evil influences of the Dormitory System as conducted upon the old methods.  It is the ligitimate (sic) outgrowth of this system that has caused men sometimes to doubt whether Colleges were blessings or otherwise.”

The College Buildings.

Learning from your records of last year that it was your wish that in no event should “Old College” remain unoccupied this year I organized it on the same basics with “New College” as a students home.  It was my good fortune to secure the services of Mrs. P. A. Summey a lady of experience and social position.  Twenty six (26) students have lodged in the Building and eaten at the table and she assure me that the young men have deported themselves as gentlemen.

Mrs. Richardson still continues to preside satisfactorily and successfully in New College.

Twenty (20) Students have boarded & lodged with her this year.  Order & propriety have reigned in her household also.

These two buildings with out any trouble or risk to students furnished lodgings and servants attentions for Thirteen dollars & fifty cents ($13.50) a month.  This is believed to be cheaper than the same board can be obtained for any College in the Country.

 

(221)

July 1880.

These ladies hold the positions only to the end of this term.  The buildings will be vacated immediately if desired by the Trustees.

 

Reports of Departments.

I have the honor to transmit to you the Report of Hon. Wm. L. Mitchell LL. D. Senior Professor in the Law Department and also the Report of Gen. Wm. M. Browne in reference to the experimental Farm.

For Graduation.

For Bachelor of Arts.

James L. Baker, O. H. Bartow Bloodworth, Walter T. Cheney, Noah M. Collens, Irly Dunklin, Charles H. Edwards, Theodore A. Hammond, W. Albert Hill, Thomas V. Lester, Joseph H. Merrill, Robt. W. Milner Jr., Banton H. Noble, Gustavus J. Orr, Jr., Chovine C. Richardson, Archibald A. Willcox, C. DeWitt Willcox, Wm. J. Williams, J. Walton Young,

Bachelor of Philosophy.

Walter T. Cheney,        Blanton H. Noble,

Chorine C. Richardson.

Civil Enginee(sic).

William H. Steele.

Bachelor of Engineering.

James M Mayne,          Leonidas F. Daniell.

Bachelor of Chemical Science.

Albert L. Cumming,      Onan M. Houser,

Bachelor of Law.

Edward T. Bishop,       Thomas S. Mell,

Richard B. Russell        Owen J. Summers.

 

Comencement (sic) Sermon.

I have engaged Rev. A. J. Battle D. D. of Macon, Georgia, to preach the Commencement Sermon on the 18th. instant.  Please make an appropriation of fifteen or twenty dollars, according to usage, to pay his travelling expenses.

 

(222)

Chancellor’s Report.

Americus High School.

I have the honor to hand you an application for scholarships in behalf of the Boys High School at Americus, Georgia, Prof. John Neely superintendent of public schools; the application meets my hearty approbation.

Health of the University.

We have reason for devout gratitude to God that He has shared the lives of all the members of the University.

No Trustee, Professor or student has died during the past Collegiate year.

I have the honor to be gentlemen

                                                Your Obedient Servant

                                                                        P. H. Mell

                                                                        Chancellor Unv. of Ga.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplementary Report

of Chancellor.

 

                                                                        University of Georgia.

                                                                                    Athens, July 20th 1880.,

To the Honorable Board of Trustees

                                                Gentlemen,

                                                                        On the ground that they have completed the course of study prescribed the Faculty, through me recommend for the University Degree of Master of Arts, Professor Samuel Barnett and Rev. William S. Bean of the Class of 1869.  and Lawton B. Evans.

                                                                        Very Respectfully

                                                                                                P. H. Mell.

Name of Lawton B. Evans                                            Chancellor Un. of Ga.

Omitted - Omission supplied by resolution

June 1900.

 

(223)

July 1880.

See

minutes

on p. 169. (left margin)

Report of Committee on Agricul. And Horticul.

                                                            To the Board of Trustees of

                                                the University of Georgia,

                                                                                    Your committee on Agriculture and Horticulture beg leave to report, that the very full report of Prof. Browne through the Chancellor which is upon your table, renders it unnecessary for your Committee to do more than make a brief reference to the conduct of the Experimental Farm.

The management of the Farm appears to have been excellent.  The zeal and interest of the Professor in his Department is unabated.  No appropriation will be called for this year.  Seasons being favorable the products of the Farm will meet its own expenditures.

                                                                        Respectfully Submitted

                                                                                                Ben. C. Yancey

Approved                                                                                             Chairman.

D. W. Lewis, }

D. C. Barrow }Committee.

J. Screven      }

 

(224)

Report of Committee on Donation.

The Undersigned Committee to whom was referred the Resolution of the Board at their meeting in August last concerning a Donation for the benefit of this University to be accumulated at compound interest for a series of years, respectfully make the following Report:

                                                A short time after their appointment your committee communicated the Resolutions of the Board of Trustees under which they were authorized to act to the friend who had proposed to make the Donation and learned from him that they were satisfactory.

After some further consultation with the Chairman of your Committee, in which he urged in vain upon this friend of the University that he should modify his intention as intimated and should limit the duration of the accumulation to a shorter period, the form of a deed was agreed upon.

It was then that your Committee first learned what the intended donation was and that it consisted of seven thousand dollars ($7000.00) in second mortgage bonds of the Western Railroad of Alabama endorsed by the Georgia & Central Rail Roads.  For these, a deed of gift was drawn up on certain trusts & limitations therein specified & which deed is herewith presented to the Board executed by the said Donor and accepted by your committee.

After the execution of this Deed and the receipt of the Seven thousand dollars in bonds of the Western Rail Road Company of Alabama, above specified, the Donor proposed that he would collect the interest on these Bonds until their maturity in 1890 at Eight per Cent and reinvest the same in Georgia Rail Road Bonds and after that date to calculate the interest at 6 per cent and Compound the same semiannually so as to allow no interest to be lost.

A calculation was made and which herewith pre-

 

(“1890” written in the left border)

 

(225)

July 1880.

-sented showing that the amount of principal & interest of the original sum compounded semi-annually will be on the 1st of January 1895 just twenty thousand dollars.  ($20000.00) so that the donor there tendered to your Committee 20 Bonds of the Georgia Rail Road Co., of One thousand dollars each bearing 6% interest, with all their Coupons cut off up to and including those due January 1st. 1895, which said last mentioned bonds Twenty thousand in amount of the Georgia Rail Road Company with the Coupons cut off as specified are herewith presented to the Board under the trusts and limitations specified in said Deed.

Your Committee recommend that these Bonds be counted, the numbers taken in duplicate & kept in separate places and that the Bonds be sealed up with the names of the Treasurer & the Prudential Committee on the package and deposited in some safe bank or deposit Company on in the Treasury of the State if the State will authorize their reception and not to be opened until July 1st. 1895.

And your Committee ask that the treasurer shall give to their Chairman a receipt for the Bonds & that your Committee be discharged.

It may be proper to add that the scheme of the Donor seems to contemplate the accumulation of this fund for about One hundred years and after all our arguments and persuasions he could not be induced to change his purpose.

                                                                        Respectfully submitted this July 16th 1880.

                                                                        (Signed)           John J. Gresham }

                                                                                                J. A. Billups        }

                                                                                                            Committee.

 

Western R. R. of Ala. 8 per cent Bonds            7000 Interest Compounded Semi-annually up to

 

 

(226)

Report of Committee on Donation.

the maturity of the bonds 1890 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 8000.

New Principal _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 15000.

Interest calculated on this new principal

at 6 per cent up to Jan. 1 1895 is _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ­­_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  5000.

                                                                                                        $20000.

This is the amount of Principal and Interest on the original sum of 7000, up to the 1st Jany. 1895 and is represented by Twenty thousand Dollars of Georgia R. Road Banking Co. Bonds with all the Coupons cut off up to & including that date.

City of Baltimore  }

State of Maryland.}

                                    Know all men by these presents that I Charles F. McCay of the City and State aforesaid for and in consideration of the affection and interest felt by me in the University of Georgia, located at Athens, Georgia with which I was connected for twenty years from 1833 to A.D. 1853 and of the sum of ten dollars to me in hand paid by the Trustees of the said University the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged have given granted & conveyed & by these presents do give grant & convey to the Trustees of the University of Georgia the sum of seven thousand dollars in bonds of the Western Railroad of Alabama, endorsed by the Georgia & Central Rail Road Companies of Georgia upon the following trusts & limitations.  First, That the Trustees of the University of Georgia shall hold and safely keep said bonds until they shall mature & not permit the principal or interest thereof to be used in any manner or for any purpose different from the donations & trusts hereinafter specified.

Second, That the said Trustees of the University of Georgia shall from time to time collect the eight per cent interest due on said Bonds & the Principal when due and shall annually or semi-annually when practicable invest the interest when received and the principal when collected in Bonds of the State of Georgia, or in bonds of the Georgia and Central Rail Road & Banking Companies or of the Cities of Augusta, Atlanta, & Savannah, Ga., and shall continue to reinvest the interest as received on said Bonds and the principal when Collected (& the dividends on said stock) so that the same shall be compounded annually or semi-annually if practicable without any diversion of any part thereof for any other uses than such reinvestment & accumulation of interest principal & dividends until the expiration of the term of twenty one years after the death of all the following named persons viz:  Marie M. Buchanan my grand daughter, George Read McCay and Emma Thornton McCay, grandchildren of my brother Isaiah, Robert McCay Bissell and Susan Kent Bissell grand children of my sister Susan, Helen McCay & Susan McCay grand daughters of my brother Neal, Laura Taylor and Catharine Taylor adopted grand daughters of my brother Kent, Thornton Carson grandson of my brother Robert, George S. Sheldon and John E. Sheldon grandsons of my sister Sally Read, Harvey DuBose Hill and Janie May Hill, grandchildren of my brother George, Thacker Howard and Antoinette Howard grandchildren of my brother Milton, Annie Bush & Annie Harrison grand daughters of my brother Albert, Sarah Jackson & Bushrod Jackson grandchildren of my sister Sarah, Minni Williams & Williams Dickens, grandchildren of my brother William, Harold Baxter grandson of my sister Martha and Arthur Machen and Abbot Gresham grandsons of my friend John J. Gresham.

And after the lapse of said time, the said Trustees shall continue to keep the aggregate sum so accumulated on the Bonds or stock before mentioned as a permanent fund and shall use the interest, or dividends therefrom for the payment of the salaries of Professors or Lecturers in the University of Georgia residing in Athens, Georgia where the University is located.

In testimony whereof I have signed and sealed these presents and a duplicate thereof this 8th day of

 

(228)

Report of Committee on Donation.

December 1879.

In presence of (signed) Charles F. McCay.  L.S.

(signed) P. G. Wallace.

 

Georgia Bill} The undersigned John J. Gresham and 

     County   }  Joel A. Billups Committee of the Board

                       of Trustees of the University of Georgia, appointed and acting under the resolutions hereunto appended do hereby accept the donation made by Charles F. McCay above specified on the trusts & limitations set forth in the foregoing deed and agree on the part of the Trustees of the University of Georgia faithfully and fully to execute the trusts therein specified and to manage and use the said funds in the manner and for the purpose therein specified by the said donor.

In testimony whereof we have hereto set our hands and seals this 13 Day of February 1880.

In presence of

(Signed) Thor. B. Gresham.                                          Signed John J. Gresham }

                                                                                                       J. A. Billups }

                                                                                                           Committee.

 

Copy of Resolutions referred to above

Whereas it has been represented to this Board that a friend of the University desires to make a donation for its benefit with a view that it shall be kept at compound interest for a given time before being used.

Resolved that this Board will receive from such friend the sum which he may give & will act as Trustee for the fund & invest the same in the manner which the donor shall designate or in Georgia State Bonds and reinvest in the same manner the interest which shall be received thereon for the time designated by the donor.

Resolved further, That this Board pledges itself that the interest & principal of such

 

(229)

July 1880.

fund shall be kept intact and not used in any manner until the experation(sic) of the time designated by the donor and then only in the manner which shall by him be authorized and set forth.

Resolved, That a Committee of two be appointed to carry out these resolutions.

Committee appointed Messr. Gresham and Billups.

The above is a true extract from the Minutes of the Trustees of the University of Georgia at their Session in August 1879.

                                                                        (Signed) Wm. L. Mitchell

                                                                                                Secretary

 

$20,000.00 in Bonds of the Georgia Rail Road and Banking Company bearing Six per cent interest payable January and July in the City of Augusta.  Principal due 1897 and 1910, payable in the City of Augusta, each Bond being for $1000. and Eight of the twenty Bonds falling due in 1897 and twelve of them falling due in 1910.  Coupons cut off to July 1895.  The Numbers of the Eight Bonds are Nos. 227, 229, 230, 569, 570, 571, 572 and 573.  The Numbers of the Twelve Bonds are Nos. 1015, 1016, 1017, 1018, 1019, 1020, 1021, 1022, 1023, 1024, 1138 and 1139.

Athens, Ga.                                                      Wm. L. Mitchell

July 24th. 1880                                                             Treasurer

                        This is to certify that I counted the said Twenty Bonds and found that number correct, that I have taken the numbers as given above in duplicate and placed them in separate vaults viz: one copy in the vault of the Southern Mutual Insurance Company of Athens and the other copy in the vault of the National Bank of Athens where I have put the Bonds sealed up and written on the package my name as Treasurer & procured the signitures(sic) of the Prudential Committee.  Not to be opened until July 1st. 1895.

Wm. L. Mitchell

            Treasurer (Along left margin.)

 

(230)

Report No.1. Of Committee on Laws & Discipline.

See

minutes

p. 169 (left margin.)

The Committee on Laws and Discipline recommend

1st.  That a Standing Committee on Branch Colleges be appointed at once by the Chair & that the matter in the Chancellor’s Report in relation to these Colleges be referred to that Committee.

2nd.  That so far as the Chancellor’s Report refers to the Library it be referred to the Committee on the Library.

3rd.  That so far as it relates to the Law Department it be referred to the Committee on that Department.

4th.  That so far as it relates to the Campus, and to Prof. White’s suggestion in respect to suitable appartments(sic) for a Museum & Gallery for Fine Arts it be referred to the Committee on Buildings and Grounds.

5th.  That so far as it refers to the Agricultural Department it be referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture.

 

See

minutes

171. (left margin.)

Report No.2. of Committee on Laws & Discipline.

The Committee on Laws and Discipline have had under consideration the Dormitory System adopted at the last Session of this Board and the failure of the Chancellor to execute the same and his reasons therefor and satisfied that it was not his intention to act in defiance of the Authority of this Board, but to move ultimately in accordance with the law, or to resign his office and that all he did he appears to have been moved by devotion to the interests of the University and to have acted with candor and in a spirit of respect for law and deference to authority, recommended the adoption of the following resolution:

Resolved, that the amendment of the Report of the Committee on Laws and Discipline adopted at the last Session and recorded

 

(231)

July 1880.

on page 150 of the Minutes be rescinded and that the Chancellor be instructed to continue the present arrangement under which the old and new college buildings are used as boarding houses with families residing therein.

 

See

minutes

p. 173. (left margin.)

                        The Committee on Buildings to whom were referred that part of the Chancellor’s report in reference to a Mineralogical and General Museum have considered the same and cordially approving the object, beg leave to recommend the passage of the following resolution;

                                                                                                Resolved,

                                                                                                            That the sum of Seven hundred Dollars be appropriated for the fitting up of the third Story of the Library Building as a Mineralogical, Geological and General Museum and that the Inspector of the Buildings be requested to carry this order into effect.

 

See

minutes

p. 173. (left margin.)

Ordered,

            That all applications hereafter made to this Board for Honorary Degrees shall be entered on the Minutes of the Board at the regular meeting preceding the one at which said Degrees shall be conferred.

 

See

minutes

p.173. (left margin.)

Ordered,

            That the Prudential Committee be authorized to set apart so much ground as shall be necessary for a vegitable(sic) garden and other conveniences for the use of Mr. Summey’s family now in the occupancy of Old College provided that the same shall not intefere(sic) with the rights of the Professors and tenants of the University.

 

(232)

Report No.3. of Committee on Laws & Discipline.

Resolved, That the Prudential Committee be requested to continue their efforts to secure a sufficient supply of Water and that the sum of three hundred dollars be and is hereby appropriated for that purpose.

 

 

 

 

See

minutes

p.194. (left margin.)

The Committee on Laws and Discipline have had under consideration the appointment of Prof. White to the office of Analytic Chemistry of the Department of Agriculture of the State by the Commissioner of Agriculture & the propriety of his acceptance submitted to this Board by him and report as follows:

The Committee think it desirable to strengthen the bonds which tie the University to the State with respect especially to its agricultural interests and recommend advised and allowed to accept the office on the following terms.

There is an annual appropriation of Three thousand dollars to this office which includes the entire expenses of it.  Of this sum some Eight hundred dollars it is estimated by the Professor will be required to purchase the chemicals and other expenses necessary thereto, and some Eight hundred more for the employment of assistance in the office leaving fourteen hundred dollars or there abouts (sic) after these necessary expenses are paid.

Of this sum or of whatever is thus left after expenses are paid the Committee recommend the One thousand dollars be used by the Professor as his Salary for this extra service and the remainder be held as a contingent fund for the repair of Apparatus used by the Professor or the purchase of New apparatus or otherwise in connection with the department of Chemistry or cognate branches of Science as may from time to time be ordered by this

 

(233)

July 1880.

Board.  In the employment of his assistants for the present, the committee approve the suggestion of the Professor to appoint two young men of the University in that business paying them a reasonable compensation therefor & selecting them in view of their proficiency in the Department of Chemistry & there desire further to prosecute their studies therein - in other words the establishment of two fellowships in the Department of Chemistry, the appointees to which shall act as his assistants in the office of State analytic Chemist.  At the expiration of the next scholastic year the Professor will have more experience in connection with this matter & may then advise & the Board may adopt another or modify the above scheme.

 

See

minutes

on pp.

125-126. (left margin.)

Report of Committee on Branch Colleges.

                                                Your Committee to whom was referred the Reports from the Presidents of the Boards of Trustees for the different Branch Colleges beg leave to report:

First.  The application of the Trustees of the South Georgia College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts located at Thomasville for the right to sell thirty acres of the land held by this Board in trust for their College and other matters in said application contained beg leave to report:

First.  That we find it just & reasonable & we report in favor of the resolutions submitted to us on that subject striking out twenty acres & inserting thirty acres in lieu thereof.

We are delighted to know & report to this Board that the success at Thomasville has met the full expectation of its most sanguine friends.

 

(234)

Report on Branch Colleges.

Resolution referred to.

Whereas in August 1879 the Trustees of the South Georgia College of Agriculture & the Mechanic Arts located at Thomasville, Ga. made and executed a Deed to the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia whereby the said South Georgia College transferred fifty acres of land on which the College Buildings are now located and by said conveyance the land so conveyed was valuable for sale, building, or improvement & if said land cannot be sold will be detrimental to the improving of the property near said College and the Trustees of said South Georgia College are anxious to utalize(sic) said land so deeded.

Be it Resolved

            That A. T. Mac.Intyre a Trustee of the University of Georgia be authorized to make a deed to thirty acres of land heretofore deeded on the following conditions,

First.  That the Board of Trustees of the South Georgia College execute a deed for an equal amount of land on Fletcher Street adjoining the lands now owned by the University of Georgia.

Second.  That as said lands are sold that were heretofore deeded to the University of Georgia viz: in August 1879 that the proceeds arizing(sic) from the sale shall be created a trust fund to build a chapel for said College on the fifty acres of land now owned by said College.

Be it further resolved

                                    That under the second provision of the first Resolution Hon. D. A. Vason & A. P. Wright be appointed Trustees to effect such sales as may be necessary & from time to time to report their action to the Board & supevise(sic) the Building of said Chapel.

 

(235)

July 1880.

Second.  We recommend that the proposition of the City Council of Milledgeville to substitute Five Thousand Dollars per annum in lieu of the land donated to the Board as a Trust fund be accepted - and the Secretary be authorized to consumate (sic) said contract for this Board - He is particularly instructed to see that the provisions of the New Constitution are fully complied with on the part of the City Council before the execution of the Contract so that there may be no question as to the validity of our title to the Bonds proposed to be substituted.

Third.  We Report that the Settlement made by our Secretary and Treasurer with the Branch College at Milledgeville is right and proper & is hereby confirmed.

Fourth.  We recommend that thirty five hundred dollars be appropriated to the Branch College at Dahlonega.

Two thousand dollars to the Branch College a (sic) Milledgeville.

Two thousand dollars to the Branch College at Thomasville.

Two thousand dollars to the Branch College at Cuthbert for the ensuing year.

Fifth.  We believe it to be a matter of great importance that the Chancellor of the University as well as a committee of four of this Board shall visit at least once in each year each one of these Branch Colleges which visiting committees shall be appointed by the President as well as five Trustees to visit the Legislature and that the expenses of the Chancellor where on duty shall be paid by the Treasurer.

Sixth.  We are more than gratified to report the healthy & successful status of each one of our schools and believe that they are awakening an interest in different portions of the state on the subject of popular education that has not heretofore been seen - let us push this system - and in our

 

(236)

Report of Committee on Finance.

Opinion the people will demand of the Legislature all the money needful to establish it in every part of the State, to that end we recommend,

Seventh.  That the Secretary of this Board shall issue a card to the people of Georgia sharing the number of pupils now being educated in each of the Branch Colleges and such other facts in relation to each of the same as shall give correct information as to what are our purposes and plans and with a request that the same be published in the different Gazettes of the State.  All of which is respectfully submitted.

                                    D. A. Vason

                                                Chairman and

                                                                        others.

See

minutes

on p. 176. (left margin.)

To the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia

The Finance Committee respectfully submit the following report.

                        From the itemized account of the Treasurer from July 21st, 1879 to 8th of July 1880, it appears that the receipts from all sources were _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $32,759.31

Cash Ballance(sic) per last report _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  7276.65

Total sum available for last year _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 40,035.96

Disbursments(sic) during same period  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $32,138.48

Exhibiting a cash ballance(sic) available for 1881. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 7,897.48

But as this ballance(sic) is a mixed fund

it may be well to present a segregated

statement.  Of it there belongs to Land-Script-Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $2855.31

 To General Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   4408.98

Library Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   633.19

 

(237)

July 1880.

Seperate Statement Land-Script

Ballance(sic) to credit Land Script   $4 788.65

Annual Income of          “        “        17 914.14 _ _ _ _ _ _ $22,702.79

Disbursements _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   19,847.48

Leaving to Credit _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _2,855.31

 

Seperate Statement Academical(sic) Fund.

Ballance(sic) to credit of this fund July 1879. _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $2,488.00

Income for year to July 1880 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 14,845.17

Aggregate Sum _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $17,333.17

Disbursements _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  12,291.00

Leaving to Credit _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  5,042.17

Of this Sum to credit of Accademical(sic) fund 5,042.17 there belongs to the Library fund which is (specifically appropriated) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 633.19

Leaving available to General Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $4408.98

The amount of money realized from Tuition

from July 1879 to July 1880 _ _ _ _ _ _2417.50

Less amount refunded _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 140.00

Net amount realized from Tuition _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$2,277.50

 

Your Committee submit estimates of available means and for expenditures for the fiscal year 1880-81.

Available Means.

Cash Ballance (sic) in hands of Treasurer July 1880 $7897.48

Annual Payment on Debt of State _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 8000.00

Interest on General Fund-Bonds _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _649.00

Interest on Terrel Endowment _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1400.00

Interest on Land Script Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 17914.14

Rents from Professors’ Houses _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  1265.00

Library Fees _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 710.00

Tuition Fees _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  2277.50

Total available per estimate _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $40113.12

 

(238)

Report of Committee on Finance.

Estimate for Expenditures.

Catalogues, Advertising and Printing _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$ 525.00

Musis(sic) $100.00  Servants hire $576.00 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _676.00

Postage $122.00  Stationery $50.00 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  172.00

Fuel $102.00  Insurance $186.00  Medals $39.00 _ _ _ _  327.00

Chemicals $103.00 Incidentals $100.00 Library $710.00  913.00

Repairs of Apparatus _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 50.00

North Ga. Agricultural College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  3500.00

South Ga. Agricultural College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  2000.00

S. W. G. Agricultural College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 2000.00

Middle Ga. Military & Agricultural College _ _ _ _ _ _   2000.00

Salaries _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  19350.00

Repairs specified in report, Com. Buildings

and Campus improvements _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _1700.00

Secure supply of water _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   300.00

Museum _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  700.00

Botanical picture and Motto _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _25.00

Total expenditures _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $34238.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The proportion of the foregoing expenditures to be charged to the Land Script Fund may be stated as follows:

For Catalogue Advertising & Printing _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $262.00

For Nursie $50.00  For Servants’ hire $376.00 _ _ _ _  426.00

Postage & Stationary(sic) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 86.00

Fuel $83.00  Chemicals, Incidentals, Repairs

Of Apparatus $142.00 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  225.00

North Ga. Agricultural College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 3500.00

South Ga. Agricultural College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 2000.00

South Western Ga. Agricultural College _ _ _ _ _ _ _  2000.00

Middle Ga. Military & Agricultural College _ _ _ _ _  2000.00

 

(239)

July 1880.

Salaries as follows:

To Professor Wm. M. Browne _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $2000.00

  “        “        H. C. White _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  1000.00

  “        “        L. H. Charbonnier _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1000.00

  “        “        D. C. Barrow Jr. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1000.00

  “        “        C. P. Wilcox _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 1000.00

  “        “        Williams Rutherford _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _1000.00

  “        “        E. W. Speer _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  1000.00

Botanical picture & motto _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  25.00

Total _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $18524.00

The Committee submits a statement of the Assetts (sic) of the University

1   Land Script Fund.

Bonds State of Ga. 8% April & Oct. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $96000.00

     “        “     “    “   7% Jany & July _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  56000.00

In the hands of Governor (7%) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 90202.17

Total _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _242,202.17

 

11   Terrell Endowment

Bonds State of Ga. 7% Jany & July _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $16000.00

    “      of Ga. R. Road Bnk’g Co. 7 % Jany. & July _ _ 4000.00

Total _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $20000.00

 

111. General Fund.

Debt of State of Ga. $8000.00 per annum assume _ _$100000.00

Bonds of State of Ga. 8% _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  3000.00

     “      “  Ga. R. R. & Bnk’g Co. 7% Jany & July _ _ _  5000.00

     “      “   Clarke County _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 500.00

     “      “   City of Athens _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 300.00

Total _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $108,800.00

 

Respectfully Submitted

 

Approved by Hon. A. T. MacIntyre                  Ben C. Yancey

and M. J. Crawford - Hon. ChairmanJ.   E. Brown & H. R. Lawton absent.     July 16th, 1880.

 

(240)

Report of Committee on Buildings.

See

minutes

p. 176. (left margin.)

Whereas there exists a vacancy in two Professorships in the Law Department:

                                    Resolved That these places be filled by the appointment of Hon. Pope Barrow Esq. & Geo. L. Thomas Esq.

 

See

minutes

p. 176 (left margin.)

Resolved, That the Auditing Committee be authorized to instruct the Treasurer to invest in interest bearing bonds any supplies that may be of the General fund over & above the Annual appropriation made by the Board of Trustees & which may be a Surplus also over & above the income of the General-fund.

 

See

minutes

p.177 (left margin.)

                                                                                                Athens, July 16th, 1880.

To the Hon. Board of Trustees,

                                                The Committee on Buildings and Grounds report that during the Session just closed work & repairs have been done on the University property as follows:

The cornice & valleys around the Library Building have been entirely rebuilt, relaid & painted.

The two Dormitory Buildings have been thoroughly repaired, white-washed, & put in general clean and good order for the accommodation of students.

Such repairs as were absolutely necessary have been made upon the premises occupied by the Chancellor & Professors Woodfin & Willcox, as well as the places rented to Mrs. Ruff, Dr. Hogan & Mr. Young.

The Roof of the Chapel has been thoroughly repaired and some necessary work done on the inside of that Building.

The Campus & Fencing have received such improvement as could be brought within the appropriation made for that purpose.

It was deemed very desirable to provide Iron

 

(241)

July 1880.

gates for the enterences (sic) to the University grounds, but after correspondence with various houses in the North and West, it was found that the cost of these alone would exceed the entire appropriation, leaving nothing for other important objects; the alternative was adopted of erecting handsome wooden gateways and using the remainder of the funds in grading the grounds, resetting & painting the fence.

The Experimental Farm in Charge of Prof. Browne has recently suffered the loss by Fire of the Barn & Stable belonging to that place.

The Fire occurred early in the morning cause unknown.

Fortunately there was nothing of value in the Building except some vehicles which were removed.

Prof. Browne intends with the force at his command to erect a plane log house which will answer his purpose & releave(sic) the Board from the expenditure of any money.

The very efficient inspector of Buildings & Grounds reports that the two Dormitories will require during the next term for whitewashing, cleansing & c. about $50.00

That Prof. Woodfin asked for repairs on his lot which altogether will cost inclusive of painting about $250.00 and also for Blackboards alterations in his recitation room & repairs to desks that will cost about $90.00 additional.

Prof. Wilcox asked for repairs on his lot & fencing estimated to cost about $60.00.

The Chancellor’s lot will require some 80 pannels (sic) of fensing (sic) at a cost of about $70.00 to enclose & exposed corner of the grounds attached to his place.

The place occupied by Dr. Hogan needs extensive repairs as well to the dwelling as fences & out buildings but as long as this property is rented as at

 

(242)

Report of Committee on Buildings.

present and no application made for it by either of the Professors it is respectfully suggested that nothing be expended upon it except what is absolutely necessary.

The same remark applies to the place occupied by Mrs. Ruff.

The Chapel Building needs many repairs & improvements.  The appropriation made by the Board at their last session contemplated this object to some extent, but upon the approach of Winter it was found that the condition of the roof was such as to render its immediate repair indispensable.  The cost of this work together with the fact that some $300.00 of expenses incurred the previous year for carpeting gas pipes and fixtures had not been paid for and that the amount had not been provided for out of the repair fund for that year which was ample for the purpose but was included in the appropriation for the present year made it inexpedient to do any thing more until further provision was made for it.  This Building will require the following repairs; for rebuilding the bellfry now in rapid process of decay $50.00  Entire renewal of the Cornice $80.00 Replastering underneath the Galeries (sic) $75.00 Whitewashing & repairs to ceiling $200.00 Additional chairs for Sittings $25.00.

The Tin roof of Moore College requires painting and will require $60.00.

The guttering & piping around Old College made of Wood soon after the war is so much decayed as to require entire renewal; the cost will be about $80.00.

The hall in the Library Building in which the Chancellor delivers his Sunday afternoon lectures should be furnished with benches.  The Sittings are now supplied with benches for only about one half of the floor & for the rest chairs are brought

 

(243)

July 1880.

from the Chapel and then earned back there for Commencement, which is very inconvenient, besides being damaging to the chairs.

The 18 benches for this purpose will cost about $90.00.

In addition to the foregoing the usual incidental expenses will be about three hundred dollars.

The aggregate of all these items is $1480.00.

To which must be added whatever amount your Honorable Body shall think fit to set apart for the further improvement of the Campus grounds. 

The Committee recommend the adoption of the following resolution.

                                                Resolved, That the sum of Seventeen hundred dollars be appropriated for the several objects herein before enumerated the same to be used for said purposes as shall be deemed most advisable.

                                                                        Respectfully Submitted

                                                                                    Young L. G. Harris

                                                                                                Chairman

See

minutes

on p. 177 (left margin.)

The Standing Committee on the Apparatus viz:  The Prudential Committee, beg leave to submit their annual report:

During the Collegiate Year now near its close, the last piece of apparatus for the Department of Physics was received & thus closed the expenditure of the $15000.00 granted the University by the General Assembly of the State.

Prof. L. H. Charbonnier commenced ordering Apparatus for his Department in 1877 and selected it with great care & bought it to the best advantage.

When he took charge of the Department there was but little of the old apparatus fit for use and the few pieces on hand were old & some of them useless.

His first case was to set aside what could be

 

(244)

Report of Committee on Apparatus

made useful and repair it when necessary.

There was a great deal of this kind of work to be done which the Professor performed with his own hands as he found time & opportunity without neglecting his other necessary duties.

The Committee are happy to report that all of the old Apparatus that could be made useful has been refitted by the Professor with the exception of a single piece a Magneto-Electric Machine which will probably need more extensive repairs than the Professor will be able to make.

However he has determined with his usual economy & devotion to his Chair of Natural Philosophy to examine the instrument thoroughly by taking it to pieces during the ensuing vacation & ascertain whether he is unable to refit it and if so he will ask a special appropriation hereafter for its repair.  The machine is a good one & is worth spending some money on.

The Professor was charged with the duty of expending the money appropriated for New Apparatus & as the means in hand were limited it became an object of great solicitude to make the money go as far as possible.

The money was not sufficient to buy every thing that a completely furnished cabinet of Physical instruments should contain, hence the necessity of a judicious selection of such pieces as would ennable (sic) a Prof. of Physics to present the subjects of his course before a class in a proper manner so as to give the students correct ideas of the methods pursued in scientific education.

It was fortunate for the University in this connection that private business called Col. L. H. Charbonnier to Europe in 1877 as he was thereby ennabled (sic) to become personally acquainted with instrument makers in England & France & upon his return

 

 

(245)

July 1880.

to the United States with some of our own manufacturers & dealers.  He was thus ennabled (sic) to determine from personal investigation where he could buy to the best advantage.

He found that E. S. Ritchie & Sons of Boston could supply a large quantity of Apparatus such as we needed at a discount of twenty per cent & also that one of the French makers would deliver goods at his own risk which was a concession for European makers who as a class are less accommodating than American makers for the reason that there is a number of pieces which they alone make & which can not be made in this country.

The Apparatus Fund was thus carefully, slowly, & economically expended.

We were singularly fortunate in receiving the new apparatus in good order.

The only accident or injury was to a French instrument, an Electric Light regulator which was sent to E. S. Ritchie & Sons to mend at a cost of Twenty five dollars.

The whole Apparatus Old and New with the exception of the Electric Magneto machine already mentioned is in perfect order nothing like it since the days of Henry Jackson M.D. LL.D. who bought in France most of the Old Apparatus & handled it with Parental care.  It is desirable to have an inventor of Every thing in the Departments of Physics, of Chemistry, and of Civil Engineering, which the Professors will prepare in due time.

The Committee take leave to say that while our Apparatus is excellent in quality & extensive in range of illustration still it is incomplete in some branches.

In the Science of Electricity we should have a set of Apparatus for Electrical Measurements

 

(246)

Report of Committee on Apparatus.

and an Apparatus for illustrating the principles of Dia-Magnetism, but the Committee forbear to ask any appropriation for the same in view of the present demands upon the funds at the disposal of the Board.

The Committee report the Chemical Apparatus & every thing in the Department of Civil Engineering in good order under the Care of Prof. H. C. White & Prof. Barrow respectively and that nothing has been added to either of these Departments during the year.

Several additions have been made chiefly be gift to the Technological Collection of the Department under the care of Prof. White, all of which are duly recorded in the proper record book.  Among others Messrs. Allen, Wood & Co., of Philadelphia & Pittsburg (sic) and the Cressent Steel Works of Pittsburg (sic) have presented Five specimens illustrating the manufacture of iron & steel. 

The two recently published diagrams of Lenoir & Forster have been added to the others of the series already belonging to us.

A number of additions nearly 300 in all have been made to the mineralogical & Geological collections all by gift mainly by gift of the citizens of Georgia, Prof. P. H. Mell Jr. of Auburn Ala. has presented a very valuable collection of claiborne fossils.

Several articles appropriate for a general museum of curiosities have been received & stored away for the present in such places as Prof. White could find to receive them.

It is much to be desired to provide at an early day proper accommodations for the Cabinet & Museum, but the committee ask no appropriation for this purpose for the reason already advanced.  Still the Committee deem it wise to keep before the mind of the Board

 

 

 

(247)

July 1880.

our wants in this as well as in other matters so that the ways & means may in some way be provided at a future day.

The Committee ask that the usual sum of $50.00 be appropriated to the Department of Physics and the sum of One hundred dollars to the Department of Chemistry.

The Committee are delighted with everything about Moore College & will not close their report upon Apparatus without urging each member of the Board to visit the building and see for himself.

                                                                        All of which is respectfully submitted

                                                                                    Wm. L. Mitchell

                                                                                                Chairman.

See

minutes

p. 175. (left margin.)

The Committee on Honorary Degrees report that the required notice having been given of the proposition to confer the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws (LL. D.) on Col. Geo. W. Raines of Augusta, the honorary degree of Master of Arts (A.M.) on P. J. Berckman’s of Augusta, David C. Barrow Jr. adjunct Prof. of Mathematics in the University of Georgia and S. J. Coffman Prof. of Modern Language, in the South Western University Clarkesville, Tenn. And the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Philosophy (P. H. D.) on Patrick H. Mell Jr. Prof. of Natural History and Modern Languages in the State Agricultural Mechanical College at Auburn, Alabama, the Committee recommend that the said Degrees be conferred by this Board,

                                                                                    B. H. Hill } Com.

                                                            (Signed) Y. L. G. Harris  }

 

(248)

Report of Committee on Honorary Degrees.

The name of S. D. Bradwell Esq. of Liberty County Georgia was reported by the Committee on Honorary Degrees for the Honorary Degree of Master of Arts, at the next stated annual meeting of the Board.

                                                                                    By order of the Board

                        Wm. L. Mitchell                                               John J. Gresham

                                    Secretary.                                                         President.

 

Mr. Nathaniel J. Hammond was elected Alumni Trustee for four years beginning August 5th 1880 and ending on Wednesday, August 1884, i.e. the first Wednesday of August 1884. & so communicated by the Secretary of the Alumni Society.

 

(249)

University of Georgia.

Library, July 15th 1881.

 

The Trustees of the University of Georgia met in stated Annual Convention this morning at 10 o’clock.  In the absence of the President and Vice President, Hon. Benjamin C. Yancey, the oldest Trustee present took the chair as required by the charter.

Upon calling the roll it appeared a quorum was in attendance and prayer was offered by the Chancellor, Rev. P. H. Mell, D.D. LL. D.

The Minutes of the last day of the last annual session were read and approved.

The members of the Board present at the opening of the meeting were Messrs. Yancey, Chairman, James Jackson, Crawford, Billups, Hall, Cobb, Harris, MacIntyre, Felton, Fannin, & Mitchell; present upon subsequent days, Messrs. Lewis, Brown, Pierce, Barrow, Speer, Hammond, and Byrd.

Excuses for absence were made for Messrs. Gresham, Miller, Stephens, Beckwith, Lawton, Cooper and Seward.

a. Recorded

at pp.

257-271. (left margin.)

a.  The Chancellor then read his annual Communication, which, with the accompanying documents, was referred to the Committee on Laws & Discipline and other standing committees, to which the topics therein discussed properly belong.

The Chair then appointed the Standing Committee on Laws and Discipline, to wit, James Jackson, Chairman, & Messrs. Crawford, Harris, Fannin, Hall & Billups.  Mr. Yancey Chairman of the Standing Committee on Finance, submitted his Report, which was read and laid on the table.

Mr. Harris, Chairman of the Committee on Buildings, read his Report, which was laid on the table. 

Mr. Mitchell, Chairman of the Committee on Apparatus, read his Report, which was laid on the table.

b.  Recorded

at pp.

273-274.

b.  The abstract of the minutes of the Prudential Committee, for the past twelve months, was read,

(250)

The Minutes of the 16th.

and the minutes submitted, and so much thereof as relates to the scholarships at Americus, and to the exchange of small lots of land with Holman, were agreed to, by the Board and the proper officers of the Board are hereby instructed to carry the same into effect.

The Board then adjourned to meet, to morrow morning at nine o’clock.

                                                            Saturday morning July 16th 1881.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Messrs. Lewis, Pierce, Hammond & Barrow appeared and took their seats.

Mr. Yancey being in the Chair, called upon Mr. Lewis, the oldest Trustee present to preside, who accordingly assured the Chair.

The Minutes of yesterday were read and approved.

The Report of the South West Georgia Agricultural College at Cuthbert was received and referred to the Standing Committee on Branch Colleges.

Mr. Yancey was appointed to invite Mr. Furman, who represents, the Middle Georgia and Military & Agricultural College at Milledgeville, to appear before the Board and make the Report of that Institution, in person, and such remarks as he desired to make; The Report, Books and Documents, were referred to the Standing Committee on Branch Colleges.

That Committee was filled up and consists of Mr. Hall, Chairman, Messrs. Fannin, Crawford, Barrow & Hammond.

  1. Recorded

at pp. 274-

277. (left margin.)

a.  Mr. James Jackson Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline, submitted a Report on the Chancellor’s Annual Communication, which was taken up by sections, amended, and adopted.  The Third & Fourth, sections were adopted unanimously; and the Fifth & Sixth, Sections were amended at the suggestion of Mr. Hammond.

So much of the Report as contemplates special honor to Mr. Harris beyond the expression of the Board; grateful acknowledgement and appreciation of his most valuable services in the improvement of the Campus, were omitted in the Report, at the most earnest

 

(251)

July 1881.

solicitation of Mr. Harris himself.

Mr. Felton having received an injury to his foot, leave of absence was asked for him, that he might return home and was granted.

Messrs. Billups and Cobb were appointed the Committee to invite distinguished persons to seats on the stage, and also to receive the Legislative Committee of the Senate and House of Representatives, to be here on Wednesday next.

The Board then adjourned to meet on Monday morning at nine o’clock.  Messrs. Yancey, Cobb and Barrow were appointed a Committee to confer with the City Authorities as to the entertainment of the Legislative Committee.

                                                                        Monday Morning July 18th, 1881.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Mr. Speer appeared and took his seat.

The Minutes of Saturday were read and approved.

On motion of Mr. Pierce, the election of a Trustee to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Mr. Abdar Johnson was resolved upon, and Mr. Wm. W. Thomas of Athens, was put in nomination by Mr. MacIntyre and upon counting the votes, it appeared that he was unanimously elected.

Mr. Hammond introduced the resolutions in relation to the Branch College at Milledgeville, which was referred to the Committee on Branch Colleges.

Mr. Pierce had leave of absence after the morning session.

Mr. Yancey introduced resolutions to print five hundred copies of the Report of the Committee on Finance, at the present session of the Board, to be transmitted to the Governor, and Members of the General Assembly now in session, & to appoint a Committee of three, to confer with the co-committee of the General Assembly, appointed to attend the present Commencement exercises, which Resolutions were adopted, and Messr. Yancey, MacIntyre & Fannin were appointed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(252)

The Minutes of the 19th.

that Committee.

a. Recorded

at pp.

277-278. (left margin.)

a.  Mr. Yancey Chairman of the Standing Committee on Agriculture submitted his Report which was adopted.

Upon the recommendation of the Committee on Honorary Degrees a, the honorary degree of Master of Arts was conferred upon Mr. S. D. Bradwell of Liberty County who was nominated a year ago.

Mr. Hammond was added to the Committee on Laws & Discipline.

Mr. Brown appeared and took his seat.

Mr. Cobb submitted the following Resolution which was adopted.

                                                Resolved, That the Faculty of the University, be permitted to under the Faculty of the Lucy Cobb Institute such assistance, as they are able to do, without interfering with their regular duties. 

a.  Recorded

at pp.

278-284. (left margin.)

  1. Mr. Harris, Chairman, of the Standing Committee on Buildings, moved to take up his Report, when the same was adopted.
  2. Recorded

at pp.

284-286. (left margin.)

b.  Mr. Mitchell, Chairman of the Standing Committee on Apparatus, called up his Report, which was read and adopted.

The Board during the day took two recesses, one to attend the Sophomore Declamation and the other the honorary oration of Albert H. Cox, A.M. before the Literary Societies, and near sun down the board adjourned to next at nine o’clock in the morning.

 

                                                                        Tuesday July 19th 1881.

The Board met according to adjournment.

The minutes of yesterday were read and approved.  The application for scholarships in their school by two gentlemen of Atlanta was referred to the Committee on Laws & Discipline.

The Report of the Branch College at Dahlonega, was made by Col. Price in person as President of the Local Board there, and referred to the Committee on Branch Colleges.

 

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July 1881.

Mr. Cobb in behalf of the Committee to confer with the City authorities and secure their cooperation in the reception of the Legislative Committees, reported verbally that the City Authorities will cooperate and pay the Hotel Bills of the Legislative Committee.

The same Committee of the Board was continued to cooperate further with the City Authorities.

a.  Recorded

at pp.

286-287 (left margin.)

a.  The Committee on Laws & Discipline made Reports Nos. 2, 3, and 4.

Report No. 2, in relation to the conferring of Degrees was taken up and adopted.

Nos. 3 & 4 were laid on the table for the present.  Col. Wright, on behalf of the Branch College at Thomasville, and as President of the Local Board there, made the Report in person, which was referred to the Committee on Branch Colleges.

Mr. Yancey submitted the following Resolution, which was adopted.

                                    Resolved, That the Chancellor be relieved from the payment of rent, including the present calendar year.

Mr. Barrow submitted the following resolution which was adopted.

                                    Resolved, That the thanks of the Board are hereby tendered to the Hon. Benjamin C. Yancey, for the oil painting of himself by a native artist, Mr. Habersham, and that the Secretary furnish a copy of this Resolution to Mr. Yancey.

Report No. 4 of the Committee on Laws & Discipline, was taken up and adopted, on the subject of a special Committee, to invite special legislation, as to changing the investments of our funds, the Report being against the change.

Mr. Cobb had leave of absence to attend to the reception of the visiting Committees from the General Assembly.

Report No. 3 of the Committee on Laws & Discipline on the subject of Free Tuition was taken up and discussed.

 

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The Minutes of the 20th.

Mr. Hammond moved to disagree to the Report and upon a call of the Yeas and Nays, the motion was lost by one vote.

The Yeas were Messrs. Mitchell, Lewis, Brown, Yancey, Hammond and Fannin. - 6.

The nays were, Messrs. James Jackson, Crawford, Billups, Hall, Barrow, Harris and MacIntyre. - 7.

 

  1. Recorded

p. 294. (left margin.)

a.  Mr. Billups moved for the appointment of a Committee of Five, to report tomorrow morning upon the importance of improving our Commencement programme; our presiding Senior Trustee to be the Chairman, and to fill up the Committee - Messrs. Billups, Jackson, Hall & Hammond fill out the Committee.

The Board then took a recess to attend the Junior Exhibition and after attending the meeting of the Alumni Society adjourned to meet tomorrow morning at nine o’clock.

                                                                        Wednesday, July 20th, 1881.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Mr. Byrd appeared and took his seat.

The minutes of yesterday were read and approved.

Mr. Hammond, moved to reconsider so much of the minutes as relate to free Tuition, having given, previous notice to that effect.  His motion prevailed and he then introduced the following Resolutions which were adopted unanimously.

                                                                        Resolved,

                                                                                    1st.  That the Committee of the Board appointed to wait upon the General Assembly shall ask that Body for an appropriation of two thousand dollars, to ennable (sic) this Board to make Tuition in the University free.

                                                                                    2nd.  That is such appropriation be made, the Chancellor shall at once advertize (sic), that no charge shall be made for tuition in the University, except ten dollars for matriculation fee, and five dollars for Library Fee, for all

 

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students matriculating after the first Wednesday of October next.

Mr. Brown after appropriate remarks, submitted the following Resolution which was adopted unanimously;

                        Resolved, That, the Legislature be requested and urged by the Committee appointed at this meeting of the Board to represent the interests of the University before the Legislature, to issue the Bonds’ of the State bearing seven per cent interest for our investments as they fall due and are paid into the State Treasury.

  1. Recorded

at pp.

287-291. (left margin.)

a.  The Report of the Finance Committee was taken up, and read by the Chairman Mr. Yancey, in the presence of the Committees of the General Assembly, who had been invited to seats on the floor during their stay in the City and to form in procession with the Trustees and Faculty and occupy seats on the stage.  The Report was adopted nem. Con. And Messrs. Yancey and Cobb, were appointed a Committee to superintend its printing and distribution.

The Board then took a recess to attend the Commencement exercises in the Chapel, when, the Degrees were conferred as voted, the Chancellor Rev. P. H. Mell D.D. LL. D. presiding and officiating.  The Board then returned and resumed business.

  1. Recorded

at pp.

291-292. (left margin.)

a.  Mr. Hall, Chairman of the Standing Committee on Branch Colleges, submitted his Report, which was read and adopted.

  1. Recorded

at pp.

292-293. (left margin.)

b.  Mr. Yancey Chairman of the Finance Committee made a supplimentary (sic) Report in relation to the donation of the Twenty thousand dollars in Ga. R. R. Bonds by C. F. McRay, which was read & adopted.

Mr. W. S. Dudley M. D. was elected President of the M. Ga. M. & A. College at Milledgeville.

The presiding Senior Trustee our Chairman, then announced the Standing Committee as follows:

1st. Committee on Finance.

Messrs. Yancey, Brown, Crawford, MacIntyre & Fannin.

 

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The Minutes of the 20th.

2nd. Committee on Library.

Messrs. Cobb, Hall, Davenport Jackson, Pierce, Stephens and Felton.

 

3rd. Committee on Buildings.

Messrs. Harris, Seward, Vason, Barrow, Mitchell, & Byrd.

4th. Committee on Agriculture & Horticulture.

Messrs. Yancey, Lewis, Barrow, Screven and Livingston.

5th. Committee on Law Department.

Messrs. Cobb, James Jackson, Lawton, Toombs, MacIntyre, and Gordon.

6th. Committee on Apparatus.

Messrs. Mitchell, Harris, Yancey, Cobb, Speer, Barrow, and Thomas.

7th. Committee to represent as before the General Assembly.

Messrs. Brown Chairman, and Hammond, Fannin, Hall and Lewis.

Mr. Thomas was added to the Prudential Committee.

The Committee on Laws & Discipline was discharged from the consideration of the application for scholarships in a school in Atlanta in view of our legislation in relation to free tuition.

The Committee on Laws & Discipline asked leave, to amend their reports so as to quadrate with our legislation of to day, in relation to Free Tuition and re-investment of our funds as our bonds fall due, and leave was granted.

Mr. Lewis Chairman of the Committee on a new Programme, for Commencement week, submitted his Report which was adopted.

  1. Recorded

pp. 294-

295. (left margin.)

a.  On motion of Mr. Lewis, his resolution requesting the Chancellor to attends certain meetings of the State Agricultural Society and other meetings in the state and pay his expenses was adopted.

In view of the difficulty of securing our Committees appointed so long in advance, to visit our Branch Colleges at their annual Commencements, it is ordered by the Board that these Committees of three he appointed hereafter by our Chancellor & Secretary after short time

 

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prior to said Commencements, and if one cannot attend, another may; these Branch Colleges, having now all of them organizations as well as a personelle (sic) in harmony with the University here.

The Board having gone through with all of its business and performed all its duties in great harmony, adjourned, Sine die.

 

  1. See                                                            a.  University of Georgia

Minutes                                                                                    July 1881

249. (left margin.)

To The Board of Trustees

                        University of Georgia,

                                                            Gentlemen,

                                                                        During the past year there have been in the Departments here increased indication of prosperity.  The harmony in the Faculty, and the kind and cordial relations between Instructors and students have been unintentionally maintained; and the young men have been more than usually contented, orderly and dilligent(sic) in the prosecution of their studies.  The numbers have not increased as we could have wished; but taking every thing into the account, we have done in this perhaps, all that could have been reasonably expected.  Unhappy contentions and divisions of some years back alienated not a few of the friends of the University and induced them to send their sons to other Institutions.  These have not as yet been won back.  Again, besides the ardent competition we experience from denominational Colleges within the state and from other colleges near the confines of our territory, which tends to diminish our possible numbers, we our selves have exerted a potent influence to induce many to remain away from the Mother Institution here by offering to instruct them in Branch Colleges free of charge - in three of them up to the end of the Sophomore year, and in one of them, throughout the whole course.  It is worthy of consideration too, whether our numbers are not affected also by the time of our vacation.  A large portion of the

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

malarial region of the State, that used to send young men here in large numbers furnish none, or but very few, now.  The vacation being exclusively in the summer they are compelled to remain away from home all the years until they graduate, or to go home at the risk of contracting fever.  Our numbers though are not contemptible; and they are increasing slightly every year.

Number of Students.

In the Departments at Athens One hundred and Fifty five (155) students have been admitted during the last Collegiate year viz:  in Franklin College Ninety two (92), in the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts Fifty six (56), Post-graduate, Two (2) and in the Law School Five (5).

Numbers of all those

who have received instruction in the

various Departments of the University during the current

collegiate year.

In Franklin College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _92

In State Coll. of Agriculture & the Mech. Arts _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _56

Post Graduates _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _2

In Law Department _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  5

Total in all the Departments in Athens _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 155

as against 152 reported last year.

In the Medical Department at Augusta _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 127

(as against 112 reported last year)

In North Ga. Agricultural College - Males  212}

 “     “       “           “                “      Females    55}Total _ _267

(as against 325 last year)

In South Ga. Agricultural Coll. all males _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 217

(as against 170 reported last year)

In South West Ga. Agricultural College, all males _ _ _ _ 125

(as against 178 reported last year)

In Middle Ga. Mil. & Ag. Coll. Males 195}

 “       “       “      “    “   “       “  Females 193}            Total 388

(as against 351 reported last year)

Total of those receiving instruction in all Departments - 1279

(as against 1288 reported last year)

 

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July 1881.

In these there are of College grade -

In Departments at Athens _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  155

In Department at Augusta _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 127

(as against 112 last year)

In the College at Dahlonega _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  48

(as against 47 last year)

In College at Thomasville _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  24

(as against 20 last year)

In College at Cuthbert _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  15

(as against 21 last year)

In College at Milledgeville _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _  73

(as against 41 last year)

Total of College grade in all the Departments & Colleges 442

(as against 393 last year).  Making a gain of 49 over last year of those in College grade. 

Excluding then the Law and Medical Departments and leaving out of the count the two Post-Graduates, it will be seen that of the College grade, there are undergraduates In the Departments at Athens _ _ _148

(as against 145 last year)

In all the Branch Colleges _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 160

(as against 129 last year) Of these

160, all are of the grade of Sophomores,

and Freshmen, excepting eight (8) at

Dahlonega viz: - five (5) Senior & three (3) Juniors.

Total undergraduates of College grade _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   308.

(as against 274 last year)  Making a gain in our whole University System of thirty four (34) undergraduates of College grade.

Dahlonega is becoming(sic) an efficient feeder to the University here:  up to this time of course no student has come to us from any other of the Branch Colleges.  I am given to understand though that some may apply for admission in October.

Medical Department.

It was my privilege to confer the Degree of Doctor of medicine on thirty six (36) young men on Commencement day of the Medical Department of the University.  Eleven (11) more

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

graduated and fifteen (15) more attended the lectures than were reported the previous year.

An Additional Instructor.

I respectfully recommend to the Board the appointment of an additional officer to our corps of Instructors.

1st.  The present officers are nearly all of them overworked.  The consequence is that if any one of them is prevented by sickness from meeting his classes, they have for the time to be virtually disbanded, so far as that officer’s department is concerned.  The other Professors are so constantly engaged that they have no time in which to offer assistance to their afflicted colleague.  During the past year one of the most faithful & persistently punctual Professors occupying a most important chair, was sick from two to three weeks.  Fortunately I found a gentleman in this town, a graduate of the University, thoroughly competent, and welcomed by the young men, who consented without pecuniary compensation to give the instruction during the Professor’s indisposition.

2nd.  Numbers of young men apply during the progress of the session when the classes have made degrees of advancement. These are sometimes slightly behind, the classes for which they apply, and need, if received, extra assistance from the Professors.  It is not wise to reject these - indeed, in the case of the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts, it is the policy of the Trustees, to turn away none who have an approximation to the qualification for admission to its classes.  In almost every case, these with the extra assistance rendered them, very soon make up their deficiency and secure regular standing in the classes. In some cases notwithstanding my multiplied engagements, I have undertaken the extra work myself.  But the most of it has been voluntarily and cheerfully performed by Prof. Barrow.  The consequence is he has been excessively overworked; for his duties in the Engineering Department alone are sufficient to employ the energies of any one officer.

 

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July 1881.

3rd.  I think it just also that Col. Charbonnier should be relieved from the physical part of the duties connected with the Military Department of the University.  I would make therefore the new officer, if appointed, a general assistant to such chairs as may need help, and an officer in the Military Department next in rank to Col. Charbonnier.  Some gentleman a graduate of this University, possessing these qualifications, can easily be obtained.

Chair of Engineering.

I think it very desirable that the Department of Engineering should be reestablished with an independent chair, and I earnestly so recommend.

  1. While the number of students who graduate is comparatively small, Bachelor of Engineering is one of the State College Degrees and Civil and Mining Engineering is one of the University Degrees.  A topic considered so important, and so emphasized in our system, is worthy to be represented by a full and independent chair.  Besides large numbers of the students, in the Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior classes, prosecute the studies of the Degree. In fact every student of the State College in these classes is under the instruction of the Prof. of Engineering or his Assistant.
  2. At present the Senior Class in Engineering recite partly to the Professor and partly to his Assistant, five (5) times a week to each.  It would be better if the recitations were all under the same Instructor.
  3. A full Prof. of Engineering would have duties, as follows:

Freshman Class State Coll. Drawing 5 per week.

Sophomore  “       “        “    Drawing 5 per week.

Junior          “       “        “     Drawing 4 per week.

Junior          “      in Engineering Surveying 3 per week.

Senior         “       “        “      Drawing 4 per week.

Senior         “       “        “      Engineering 5 per week.

                                              Total _ _ _  26 per week.

But in as much as the Juniors and Seniors in

 

 

 

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Chancellor’s Report

Drawing can be made to work at the same time the actual number if hours of the Prof. would be 22 per week.

These hours are at present apportioned as follows:

The Professor has 5 hours.

The Assistant has 17 hours.

  1. The Prof. of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy and of Engineering, besides his 5 engagement in Engineering has 9 engagements with Classes in Physics and Astronomy and three per week in Drill-making 17 per week in all.  While this would not be excessive, if the work consisted above of lecturing and meeting classes, it must be remembered that the least part of a Prof. of Physics is that of meeting his classes.  Before each lecture experiments have to be prepared, and diagrams to be drawn on black board.  After each lecture, Apparatus has to be cleaned and put away.  The care of large and valuable Apparatus, like that under the charge of the Prof. of Physics, requires constant attention and much time.

It would not be impertinent, but an act of justice for me to say that should the Board adopt the recommendation now made it would give us all great satisfaction should Prof. D. C. Barrow now assistant be promoted to the grade of Professor, and be assigned to this Chair thus reestablished.  In all this I have Col. Charbonnier’s hearty concurrence.  He cordially agrees with me that the independent Chair should be reinstated and gives the highest testimony to Mr. Barrow’s faithfulness, in the discharge of past duties and to his competency to fill the position now under consideration.

In words addressed to me in writing he says “The fact that Mr. Barrow has been so efficient and so willing to do hard work ought to entitle him to promotion.”

Were Mr. Barrow not connected with our Faculty it would be impertinent for me to mention his name in this connection, bearing such relations as I do to him, it becomes my imperative duty to him and to the Board to make such mention.

 

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July 1881.

Improvement of Campus Grounds.

Very great changes by way of improvement have been made in the Campus Grounds, during the past year.  At the instance of Col. Young L. G. Harris, I visited Mr. P. J. Berckmans’ at his “Fruitland Nursery”, and requested him to recommend to us a Landscape Gardener competent to draft, and execute, a plan for the improvement of our grounds.  Unexpectedly to us, but greatly to our satisfaction, he promptly offered to undertake the task himself, without charge, and proffered to furnish us as a present all the exotic trees that were needed for ornamentation.  At the proper time Mr. Berckmans visited us paying his own travelling expenses and refusing the tender of the amount of money thus expended by him.  While here he made for us a draft of the Campus, locating the walks and drives, giving minute directions as to the preparation of the soil and marking out the locations severally for the ornamental trees he engaged to send.  These, rare and valuable, numbering more than two hundred, he presented to us as a munificient (sic) gift-claiming the right to replace those that may die, and asking it as a privilege to complete the ornamentation of the Campus in this direction.  The Faculty have passed us motions of thanks to Mr. Berckmans, and served him with a copy; and the Trustees will no doubt take fitting notice of his kindness and munificence.

To carry out Mr. Berckmans’ plans, & to superintend and conduct actual work in the Campus, we were singularly fortunate in securing the services of Mr. John a. Meeker, a wealthy and scientific farmer, living in the vacinity (sic), of Athens, - a gentleman whose studies and tastes eminently qualify him to play the role of Landscape Gardener himself.  Mr. M. has carried on the work as a labor of love. Much that Mr. Berckman’s

Mentioned, but intentionally omitted to recommend, because he thought the University could not undertake the expense now, Mr. Meeker has at his own expense skillfully & tastefully executed. Through his liberality

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

and personal attentions we have accomplished in a few months what with our necessarily limited appropriations would have required years for their completion.

The Board will no doubt by resolution take suitable notice of the liberality and services of Mr. Meeker.  But on the ground that he is well known as a scientific farmer and as a graceful recognition of our obligations to him, I recommend that the Board by unanimous consent waive the rule requiring one year’s notice, and confer upon him the Honorary Degree of Master of Agriculture.

A cursory glance will show the numbers of the Board what great things Col. Harris has accomplished within a very few years.  Commencing work on the unsightly grounds in the West Campus in front of Moore College he very soon transformed them from deformity to beauty.  Consulting no professional expert, but guided solely by his own judgement and taste he filled the space with graceful terraces that admirably harmonize with, and set off with greater impressiveness, the architectural building that crowns their summit.  All this he did with no pecuniary compensation and with great consumption of his most valuable time.

Besides smoothing their few slight inequalities and completing their adornment by trees and shrubs and grass, nothing is needed to these terraces, but a system of drainage.  It would be but a just and graceful recognition of the service rendered, should the Board formally by vote, give this part of the Campus the name, “The Harris Terrace”, and authorize and instruct the Faculty to make manifest, and perpetuate the name by suitable inscription on slab or pillar.  Completing the Western Campus, Col. Harris gave attention next to the Iron fence; to the Front or East Campus; and to the South Campus i.e. the one in front of the Chancellor’s house.

The two plats of ground were gullied (sic) old fields, that were a grief & a shame to all the intelligent friends of the University.  The extraordinary transformations here given

 

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July 1881.

hopeful promise of grounds that will be a pride and a joy to all.  To protect these grounds from stock, there is need of a gate-keeper; and to keep them in order, requires the constant attention and labor of one man.  It would be very gratifying to me if the Trustees should feel themselves able to instruct the Prudential Committee to build a Porter’s Lodge and to engage a Keeper of the grounds.

The Library.

I am happy to announce that this valuable property is now complete so far as safety to books and systematic arrangement are concerned.  Under your wise instructions, wire doors under lock & key protect the books and a complete catalogue is recorded in a book so large as not to be easily misplaced.  In this not only the names of the books, are recorded, and the classes to which they belong and the special topics on which they treat, but their places severally in Alcove and shelf, while labels in all the books show their appropriate places, and corroborate the statements in the Record, or Catalogue, Book.  On the briefest inquiry not only definite books can be found, but the Library can be exhaustively consulted as to the books on its shelves that treat on any topic of inquiry.  The Librarian reports that 220 books have been added by purchase during the past year.  Hereafter all the Library fund, after paying the salary of the Librarian, can be expended in the purchase of books.

It would add very much through to the books of the Library if the Board could from some other fund, appropriate money for the purchase of a new carpet.

Museum and Art Gallery.

The Board last year ordered that the Third story of the Library Building be modified and fitted up for a museum.  This work has been done according to instructions and the Room stands now ready for your inspection.

Last year I ventured to suggest that it would be desirable to establish an Art Gallery also in this room, or in another which could be easily arranged for the purpose.  Were such a thing earnestly attempted, no

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

doubt sum of the munificient (sic) friends of the University would contribute to it in painting and statuary.  But one thing can be certainly accomplished.  It is very important that the University should have the portraits of all who have been its guardians.  If the present number (“members” above in pencil) of the Board as Hon. A. H. Stephens has done, would make presents of their portraits to us and if surviving friends or decendants (sic) could be induced to furnish to us in the same way those of the Trustees deceased, our walls would be adorned by the portraits of a large portion of the distinguished men that have illustrated Georgia in her whole history.  What I felt at liberty last year to throw out merely as a suggestion, I beg leave now to present as our earnest recommendation and request.

Party Political Subjects, and Students’

Speeches at Commencement.

In the year 1867, the Board of Trustees by Resolution, “re-affirmed its conviction of the importance of that law of the University by which party political subjects are excluded from the speeches of students at Commencement”; and the Faculty, so far as I know have always sympathized with that Conviction.  On examination though I find that, while the prohibition exhists (sic), there is no detailed way prescribed for its enforcement.  The Faculty therefore have adopted the following regulation in the premises, and respectfully submit it to the Board for their consideration and approval:

“All party political subjects and allusions are to be excluded, from the speeches of Students appointed by the Faculty to take part in the exercises at Commencement.  All the speeches of those thus appointed shall be submitted to the Prof. of Belles Letters at such time as he may direct; and no student shall make any addition to the corrected copy handed him by the Professor, or deliver any thing on the stage which he has been directed to omit.  Should any Senior violate this Law, it shall be the duty of the Prof. of Belles Letters to report promptly the fact to the Chancellor

 

 

 

 

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July 1881.

who is hereby instructed, in conferring the degrees, to pass over in silence the name of the Senior so offending, and thus omit to confer a degree upon him.  Should a Junior or Sophomore thus offend, such penalty shall be inflicted on him as to the Faculty may seem appropriate.”

As Diplomas are delivered to members of the Senior Class by the direct instructions of the Board of Trustees, a regulation of this kind, before it can be legally enforced, must receive the sanction of your honorable Body.  The Faculty then, Gentlemen respectfully request you to consider this regulation, and if it meets your approbation, to ennact (sic) it into a law.  Or, should this not suit, your views, it would be gratifying to us should you adopt some other regulation that may in your opinion more suitably & efficiently secure the intended object.

Branch Colleges.

According to your instructions, I visited all the Branch Colleges at the time of their closing exercises, and found them in the main in flourishing condition.  At Dahlonega and Thomasville I attended a part of their final examinations, and was enabled thus to inspect their methods of instruction.  At Cuthbert and Milledgeville, I witnessed nothing in the literary department, but the usual Commencement exercises on the stage, though I had the opportunity at Milledgeville to inspect the written examination papers.  At Dahlonega the examinations were oral exclusively; but they gave a satisfactory exhibit of the thoroughness of the Professors and the proficiency of the students.  The examinations at Thomasville and at Milledgeville, gave me very great satisfaction.  These were all written in the case of Thomasville, from the highest to the lowest and in the case of Milledgeville with the exception of the primary studies.  I was able to inspect the papers of pupils with this exception in all grades and to examine the questions propounded by the

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

Teachers in all the departments.  These questions showed the most thorough analysis of the various topics; and the papers of the pupils while exhibiting the usual variety in degrees of proficiency, showed that they had been taught to go down to the bottom of subjects and to deal with them in all their details.

I found all the communities in which the Colleges are severally located units in their support, with the single exception of Cuthbert.  This College has labored under some little difficulty, from local divisions during the past year; but its success has been extraordinary, all things considered, and it anticipates complete success in the near future.

All these Institutions, excepting that at Milledgeville are laboring under disadvantages, for the want of buildings completed and adapted to their purposes.  The College at Thomasville has no room large enough to seat at one time more than forty pupils.  There is no daily gathering together therefore of the students in a body; and no recognition of God in daily chapel service.  But the local Board and other friends have shown great liberality in their pecuniary contributions and they assure me that as soon as possible, a chapel shall be erected.  At Cuthbert they are remodeling the house once occupied by the Bethel Female College.  This when completed will go far towards meeting all their wants in this regard. The Trustees at Dahlonega, are still working on their magnificent house; and it is slowly advancing towards completion.  The noble audience room, constituting the chapel though unfinished, furnished adequate accommodations for Commencement exercises.  It is to be hoped that this College will receive pecuniary assistance, from the state at least to the extent of the cost of rebuilding their house.

I had the pleasure of conferring the Degree of Bachelor of Arts on three who had completed the course of study in the North Georgia Agricultural College.  One of these was a young lady.

 

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July 1881.

Terms of Graduation.

In August 1878 with the intention to take away from any individual Professor the pernicious power to prevent the graduation of a student, the Board of Trustees enacted a law in the following words:

“Provided that the graduation of a student, and the Degree, which shall be recommended to be conferred in the curriculum pursued by him, shall be in accordance with the joint judgement of the Faculty upon the general average of the standing of the student in the whole course, and shall not depend upon the judgement of any one Professor in any Department.”  For some reason without any application to them by the Faculty through the Chancellor and without reference to or formal repeal of the law of 1878, quoted above, the Board passed a regulation in the following words:  “If in the judgement of the Faculty, a student applying for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts at his graduation has been faithful in his attention to all the Departments necessary to the degree, and has made an average in all the combined marks in those Departments equal to that required in any one of them, he shall be entitled to a Diploma.”  It will be seen that this rule is limited in its application to students, “applying for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts.”  Now we have five other Bachelor Degrees - two in Franklin College, and three in the State College - that we suppose to be of equal rank with the A.B. Degree, that seem to be entirely excluded from the operation of this law.  We cannot suppose that this is the intention of the Trustees, and we feel at liberty therefore to solicit further legislation on the subject.  In the effort to take unreasonable power from the individual Professor an opportunity was given to the student to neglect and virtually omit any Department so far as it related to his individual curriculum of study.  For it is possible for a student by the present rule to obtain a Diploma even though his mark is zero in any one Department.

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

The Faculty unanimously request your Honorable Body to modify the rule of 1878, so that it may stand in the following words:  “Resolved, That the graduation of a Student, and the Degree which shall be recommended to be conferred in the Curriculum pursued by him, shall be in accordance with the joint judgement of the Faculty as that judgement is expressed by the general average of the standing of the student in the whole course, and shall not depend upon a like judgement of any one Professor in any one Department - Provided that no student shall be recommended for graduation who neglects or refuses to attend any Final Examination, or whose general average falls below 50 in any Department.”

Dormitory Buildings.

Mrs. Summey in “Old College” and Mrs. Richardson in “New College” have managed them as Students’ homes to the satisfaction of all.  On an average, sixty students have occupied these Buildings during the last Collegiate year.

 

Reports of Departments.

I have the honor to transmit to you the Report of Hon. Wm. L. Mitchell LL. D. Professor in the Law Department; of Prof. H. C. White on the work of the Chemical Department; and of Genl. Wm. M. Browne, in reference to the Experimental Farm.

Commencement Sermon.

I have engaged Rev. Dr. Boggs of Atlanta, Ga. to preach the Commencement Sermon on the 17th Inst (?).  Please make an appropriation of fifteen or twenty dollars according to usuage (sic), to pay his travelling expenses.

Death of Col. Abda Johnson.

The painful tidings have reached us of the death of Col. Abda Johnson, one of the honored numbers of your Board.  I am not sufficiently informed to speak in adequate terms of his life and character or of the circumstances of his death.

 

(271)

July 1881.

Graduation of Students.

I beg leave to present in a Supplementary Report the names of the Students whom the Faculty would recommend for graduation.  My absence in the discharge of duties assigned to me by the Trustees has left as yet undecided some preliminary questions.  I hope to report on the subject at least by tomorrow, Saturday 16th instant.

                                    I have the honor to remain Gentlemen,

                                                            Your ob’t Serv’t.

Un. of Ga.                                                        P. H. Mell.

Athens, Ga. July 15th 1881.                  Chancellor Univ. of Georgia.

 

Supplementary Report.

 

To the Board of Trustees

                        University of Georgia,

                                                            Gentlemen,

                                                                        The Faculty

have instructed me to recommend to you for graduation the students whose names are given below:

For Bachelor of Arts.

Marcus W. Beck                      John P. Matthews

George R. Brown                     David W. Meadow

Enoch H. Callaway                   Gwinn H. Nixon

Joseph G. Camp                       Wm. L. Radney

  John E. Gross                       James B. Sanders

Walter W. Hardy                      John R. Slater

Fletcher R. Lowe                      Henry C. Tuck

John T. Malone                        George Ware

Williamson Worrill.

 

For Bachelor of Philosophy.

Thomas W. Alexander,             Clement J. Hood,

G. Morgan Eldridge                              M. Cooper Pope.

 

(272)

Chancellor’s Supplementary Report.

For Bachelor of Science.

William T. Bennett                    Charles H. Brand.

Austin L. McRae.

 

For Bachelor of Chemical Science.

James L. Howell.

 

For Bachelor of Engineering.

J. deBruyn Kops.

 

For Bachelor of Law.

James H. Palmer.

 

Mr. Lawton B. Evans, a post graduate has been during the past year faithfully pursuing the course prescribed for the Degree of Master of Arts.

Unfortunately in consequence of sickness, he has not been able to attend his Final Examination.  The Faculty therefore request that you pass an order instructing the Chancellor to give to him the Diploma for Master of Arts as soon as he shall have passed those Examinations satisfactorily.

 

Scholarship to Schools.

I received a letter yesterday from Dr. Dudley President of the Branch College at Milledgeville, asking me to recommend the Board of Trustees to confer on that Institution three scholarships in Franklin College.

A similar letter also reached me by the same mail from Mr. Benjamin T. Hunter asking a like favor in behalf of the “Boys High School at Albany Ga.”

I cordially endorse Dr. Dudley’s application and respectfully refer Mr. Hunter’s letter to the Board for their favorable consideration.  If the “Boys’ High School” has been a large and successful school in the past, & promises to be so in the future, it would be in accordance with the past policy of the Board to grant the scholarships asked for.  I am sorry to say that

 

(273)

July 1881.

I have no further information in the premises than that contained in Mr. Hunter’s letter.

 

Committee of the Legislature.

I see by the newspapers that the Legislature has honored us by appointing, as visitors to us, twenty members of the House and six members of the Senate.  I respectfully call the attention of your Committee on Invitations to this fact; and beg them to consider the question as to what seats in the Chapel shall be offered to these gentlemen.  The Numbers of the Faculty who have no official work to do, will take pleasure, if necessary, in vacating their seats on the stage.

                                                I have the honor, Gentlemen, to remain

                                                                        Your Ob’t. Serv’t.

University of Georgia                                                    P. H. Mell.

Athens, July 18th, 1881.                                    Chancellor Univ. of Ga.

 

See

  1. Minutes

pp. 249-250. (left margin.)

  1. The Prudential Committee have held few meetings during the past twelve months:

The following Abstract of their minutes will advise the Board of what has been done:

  1. The Committee advised the payment of an Old account for work and materials done and furnished by E. E. Jones, amounting to the sum of $26.00
  2. Mrs. Waddell was notified that the cottage on the lot of her residence must be removed by the end of the Calendar year.
  3. Mr. Cobb was authorized to open a correspondence with friends and R. R. Companies in order to procure for the museum the parts of the Whale captured on the coast of Georgia, and suitable for the museum.
  4. It was ordered by the Committee that a copy of the Report on the Apparatus at the last meeting of the Board be furnished the press for publication after the diction of the Governor, when the excitement will be over.

 

(274)

Report No.1 of Committee on Laws & Discipline.

  1. Scholarships were granted to the school at Americus, provisionally, upon the usual terms, the Chancellor having already assured that School of the grant.
  2. An exchange of land consisting of two small plats, with Mr. Holeman, was approved by the Committee, & the said exchange, recommended to the Board at their next stated Annual meeting.
  3. The Waddell cottage was purchased for the sum of Two hundred & Seventy five dollars.

Respectfully Submitted

            Wm. L. Mitchell

July 15th, 1881.                                                                                    Chairman

 

  1. See

minutes

p. 250.

  1. The Committee on Laws and Discipline have had under consideration so much of the able and lucid Report of the Chancellor, as is properly within their jurisdiction, under the resolution of the Board, and submit the following Report:
  2. Whilst it may be that the University at Athens loses some students from Southern Ga. because there is no winter vacation to permit those from that section to return home at a season free from danger of malarial disease, the Committee cannot recommend a change of the present vacation.  Every where vacation from labor is in the summer when the extreme heat renders rest almost essential for recreation to teacher & scholar, and if the vacation were divided the summer rest would be too short to attain that necessary object - We do not understand the Chancellor to recommend in terms any change and we doubt that he and the Faculty really desire it.
  3. The uncertain contingency of the sickness of one or more of the Professors, all now in good health, is not good ground for the employment of another Prof. or teacher; should such a contingency occur and temporary help be needed, let it be temporarily supplied.  If the Professors remaining in good health can not supply it, the Chancellor by and with the advice and consent of the Prudential Committee should employ temporary assistance

 

(275)

July 1881.

either from the advanced classes or graduates of the University or others.

To relieve Prof. Charbonnier from the duty of constant attention to the military drill, of the students, let him be authorized at such times and on such days as he pleases to appoint any student to take his place for the particular occasion.  We have no apprehension that he will abuse the confidence thus reposed in him.

  1. We recommend that Prof. Barrow continue as adjunct Professor of Mathematics and Engineering and that all the duties appertaining to the latter science be entrusted to him, so as further to relieve the press upon Prof. Charbonnier.  As compensation for the additional labor thus put upon Prof. Barrow we recommend that his salary be increased from $1000.00 to $1600.00 per annum, and it is so ordered.
  2. We recommend that the Board of Trustees unite with the Chancellor and Faculty in appreciation the noble and disinterested work done, and contributions made by Hon. Young L. G. Harris, of Athens; by Mr. P. J. Berckmans A. M. of “Fruitland” near Augusta; and by Mr. John A. Meeker of Athens; on the Campus Grounds which have been so much improved & beautified by them - and we return thanks to each of them for his several contribution & service - to Mr. Harris, for his labor of love in terracing with so much taste much of the campus & in his attention to the Iron Fence and Buildings & grounds generally - to Mr. Berckmans, for his voluntary patriotism in leaving Augusta & as an ornamental gardener so handsomely laying off the grounds and adorning them with trees & shrubs free of expense - and to Mr. Meeker for service in completing Mr. Berckmans’ work and his munificent contributions to the Campus.

We further recommend that the honorary Degree of Master of Agriculture be conferred on Mr. Meeker

 

(276)

Report No.1 of Committee on Laws & Discipline.

and that the Secretary be instructed to inform these gentlemen of the action of this Board.

  1. We recommend that a suitable lodge be erected as asked for by the Chancellor for the keeper of the grounds & the Campus and that the Chancellor be authorized to employ a suitable person to take charge of the Campus & grounds and keep the sum in good order & repair, under his supervision & direction.
  2. We concur that a suitable place be prepared for the Gallery of Arts as recommended by the Chancellor, and that his views in regard to the same be adopted as our own by the Board.

At the suggestion of Mr. Hammond sections 5 & 6 were amended as follows and adopted:

That the Prudential Committee take such steps as they deem necessary for the preservation of the shrubery (sic) &c. on the premises, provided that they shall incur no greater expense than the employment of a servant to have care of the same.

That the Chancellor be and is hereby authorized to accept in the name of the Board any pictures or statuary that may be presented to them and deposit the same in the Library or Museum, as the Gallery of Arts he recommends.

  1. We also concur with the Chancellor in regard to the enforcement of the Law is respect to Partisan speeches at Commencement by the students and recommend that the Faculty be empowered to take such action to enforce it as to them shall seem most advisable.
  2. We also recommend that the action of this Board in 1878 and at its last session touching the Degree of proficiency in the various studies necessary to entitle the student to any of the College Degrees he modified as set out in the Report of the Chancellor.
  3. We are gratified at the union of the University with the Agricultural Department of the State Government and feel indebted to Prof. White for the

 

(277)

July 1881.

ability with which he has sealed that union to the advantage of both the University and the State.

We have read his Report transmitted to us by the Chancellor with much interest & pleasure, and we recommend that the Board authorize & empower him to continue in the course marked out by him in that Report for future action as the Chemist of the State department of Agriculture.

His course aided by the valuable assistance of the efficient Prof. of Agriculture which is gratefully acknowledged in the Report of Prof. White must be productive of great good to the greatest interests of Georgia - the productions of her soil - and the science of her own University be thus made to contribute largely to her glory and wealth.  Indeed the entire report of Prof. White meets our approbation, and we recommend that the Board so far from objecting to any recommendation therein, bid him God speed in all the lines of advance he proposes for the future.

 

  1. See

minutes

p. 252. (left margin.)

  1. To the Board of Trustees of the Univ. of Ga.

Your Committee are fresh from a visit to the Experimental Farm attached to the duties of the Chair of Agriculture, and a partial inspection of the crops, we are ennabled (sic) to report the farm in a very satisfactory condition, the crops promising, the corn unusually fine, and their cultivation all that can be desired.  The grounds adjoining the house have been much improved.  They have been tastefully laid out and a number of additional ornamental trees & shrubs & flowers planted out.

The meathods (sic) and order which prevail throughout the farm are specially noticeable.

Prof. Browne is conducting a number of valuable experiments on many points of interest to advanced Agriculture, for further details of which we would

 

(278)

Report of Committee on Buildings.

refer you to the Professor’s Report.

We recommend that the appropriation of $200.00 for which Prof. B. asks for farm horse and some scientific instruments be granted.

We take pleasure in commending the judicious management of the farm and should the funds at the disposal of the Board of Trustees warrant, would favor the appropriation of a sufficient sum to widen the scope and increase the usefulness of this valuable branch of Agricultural Education.

We observe the decaying condition of steps and the verandas which Prof. B. has had proped (sic) up by common scantling.

We suppose the Committee on Buildings will call your attention to the matter and ask for a suitable appropriation to repair them.

                                                                        Respectfully submitted

                                                                                                Ben. C. Yancey Chr.

                                                                                                D. W. Lewis.

 

                                                                        Athens, July 15th, 1881.

  1. See

minutes

p. 252. (left margin.)

  1. To the Board of Trustees,

The Committee on Grounds & Buildings report, that through the dilligent (sic) judicious oversight of the excellent superintendent of these interests of the University, all the Buildings belonging to the Institution have been kept in ordinary good repair.  The number of Buildings owned by the University and the lapse of time since the erection of most of them, require for their preservation constant watchfulness and expenditure.  During the year just closed the usual outlay has been made for repairs to the dwellings occupied by the Chancellor, Professors and others and the fences inclosing the several lots.

Besides this a considerable sum has been expended in repairing cisterns, providing new gutters and watter (sic) pipes for the dormitories and in

 

(279)

July 1881.

miscellaneous work on the Dormitories and other Buildings.

The General improvement to the Chapel Building contemplated in the application which was made to the Board at its last session has not been made, for the reason that so large a portion of the appropriation was absorbed by other indespensable (sic) claims and because some parts of the building were in much worse condition than had been supposed.  The belfrey (sic) has been leaking for several years requiring frequent mending and patching.

Recent thorough inspection revealed the absolute necessity of entire repairing, painting, and covering it with tin.

This involved the expenditure of about $200.00 but this part of the structure will not need further attention for some years to come.

The Museum hall ordered by you at your last session has been handsomely fitted up in the Third story of the Library Building.  The whole story has been thrown into one room.  The walls have been frescoed, neat and convenient glass cases provided for the reception of specimens and the hall put in fine order for the display and preservation of whatever may be placed in it.  This work cost about $500.00

The general expenditure has been increased by the purchase of chairs for the use of the Board of Trustees in the Library and on the Chapel Stage, by work on the Library building, seats for the room, in which the Chancellor delivers Sunday lectures to the Students, furniture for Professors Recitation Rooms including the replacement of old, with new stories and for posts and wire fencing for the Eastern Campus.

Long needed and valuable improvements have been made in the College Grounds.  Correspondence was had with P. J. Berckmans Esq. of Augusta and his

 

(280)

Report of Committee on Buildings.

views solicited as to the best plan for laying out the grounds and stocking them with ornamental trees.

His response most courteously proposed not only to furnish the plans but to donate the trees.

He increased our obligations by visiting Athens at his own expense and making a handsome diagram of the whole Campus.

Subsequently he sent us a large number of valuable Trees and shrubs which have been set out and will soon beautify the Campus.

Mr. John A. Meeker of this City and estimable gentleman and an adept in farming operations was engaged to conduct the proposed improvements.

The soil was thoroughly broken and graded as well in front of the Chapel as between the old College and the Chancellor’s house, A large number of trees dug up and all stones and roots removed.

Mr. Meeker stated that the character of the work was such that he could not make an exact estimate of what it would cost, but that he would be governed by directions given as to the amount of work to be done.  He was directed not to exceed $100.00  He became very much interested as the work progressed and evinced a determination to do it very thoroughly.  Fearing that his plan of operations would cost too much and learning from him that he had already spent more than the $100.00 he was told again distinctly that he could not pay above the sum of $200.00 and that he must close up within that limit.  He persisted in the work without taking counsel of any one, until finally after several conferences with him and most earnest expostulations against the expensive style in which he was proceeding, he was most positively informed that, in no event would the College be responsible for any thing exceeding $1500.00 for any amount of work that he might do, & that he must so regulate his movements as that when that point was reached, he must absolutely suspend

 

(281)

July 1881.

operations, as we did not wish to be placed in the position of declining to pay for labor bestowed in this way.  To all of this Mr. Meeker replied that he understood the matter perfectly - that he knew how the work ought to be done and could not consent to quit until he had completed it according to his own views and that if the Trustees should not pay him any thing beyond the limit which had ultimately been given he would contribute the ballance (sic) himself to the cause of education and improvement.  He continues the work until he reports the actual expenditure of $374.25 beyond the $500.00 which has been paid to him and for which he gave full receipts.  The work has been done with extraordinary care and completeness without any charge by Mr. Meeker for constant toil and personal supervision, but there is no obligation whatever upon the Board to pay any thing beyond the contract, nor does indeed Mr. Meeker make any claim as matter of right, but to use his own words “Unless the Trustees feel able to return the amount which would be quite acceptable.” He is quite willing to let it go as a contribution from himself to the interests of the University “as the extra work was done at his own expense and without any expectation of remuneration.”

The House purchased from the widow of the late Prof. Waddell at the price of $275.00 was destroyed by five presumably the work of an incendiary.

Nothing combustible was saved except a few window blinds.  The bricks from the chimneys have been used for covering drains on the Campus.  The loss of this building is the more to be regretted on account of the useful purpose to which it was hoped the Trustees would have appropriated it.  Two things your Committee venture to suggest as indispensably necessary to the preservation of the valuable improvements which have been made on the University grounds during the past two years, as well as such additions thereto as it may

 

(282)

Report of Committee on Buildings.

be your pleasure to direct in the future.

The one is a porters cottage or lodge, to be placed at the enterance (sic) of the grounds near the old labratory (sic) to be occupied by some person who services could be made most useful not only in guarding from intrusion the enterance (sic) to the grounds, but in conducting the small repairs and amendments which constantly require attention.  The cost of the porter’s lodge would not exceed $300.00 while the price paid to the porter would be perhaps less than that amount and would be amply repaid by the various services which he could be made to render.

The other means of security would be found in a proper system of drainage, especially on the Western Campus, which would cost probably about $200.00

The beautiful terraces and grounds in front of Moore College can not withstand the volume of water thrown upon them during heavy rains from the roofs of the Chapel Demosthenian Hall, Ivy building, and Library.

If these waters were collected into an underground brick or terracotta sewer, running from the Chapel Northward, it would protect the grounds from washing rains and might be made with the concurrence of the City authorities a means of greater protection to your buildings from fire, if the water should be emptied into a cystern (sic) between the Commercial hotel & the Library.

The College Chapel is in great need of thorough renovation.  The roof, plastering, ceiling and painting of this Building will require about $500.00  The roof of the Library Building needs probably about $150.00

Painting the roof of Moore College about $80.00.

For the usual fitting up of the Dormitories, dwellings, current minor repairs and cleaning, the sum of at least $600.00 will be required.

The grass lawn in the Campus will need attention to keep it in order.

Mowing it by hand is tedious & expensive.

 

(283)

July 1881.

The purchase of a mall one horse mower and small wagon for the purpose of watering the trees and plants in the grounds would meet a felt want.  The cost would be inconsiderable.

No further improvement of the Campus is deemed necessary at present.

The setting of a few trees in the fall will involve a trifling expense.

The large lot of evergreen & other valuable plants generously donated by P. J. Berckmans Esq. of Augusta are for the most part in fine condition and will soon add very much to the attractions of the grounds.

The University High School buildings in the occupancy of Prof. Browne are in tollerable (sic) condition except the verandas and steps to the main building.  These buildings have been no expense for the past year.  The upper verandas are in bad condition the woodwork being much decayed.  It will require very nearly or quite 1000 dollars to take down & replace these structures, in good order.  You Committee suggest as the best course to be pursued that the upper verandas be taken down and the iron packed away for preservation and such future use as the Board may make of it.  The lower front veranda and the steps can be put in good order at an expense of about $300.00  It is much to be desired that a plain cheap structure costing only a few hundred dollars should be erected on the grounds adjacent to the dormitories to be used by the students as a gymnasium.  Such exercise and amusement would be greatly promotive (sic) of health.

To accomplish all that is indicated in this Report would require in the aggregate about $2000.00 exclusive of the porters cottage and gymnasium.

Whatever amount you may think fit to appropriate to these several purposes can be used in the best judgement of those who are charged with these several matters of interest unless it shall be your pleasure

 

(284)

Report of Committee on Apparatus.

to give specific directions with reference to any special object in which case your orders shall be obeyed.

                                                                        Respectfully Submitted

                                                                                    Young L. G. Harris

Drainage          $200.00                                                Chairm. On Committee of

Chapel. _ _ _ _ _500.00                                              Grounds and Buildings

Library _ _ _ _ _150.00

Moore Coll.          80.00

Miscellaneous    600.00

Mower &c           75.00

Univ. High Sch. 300.00

                       $1905.00

 

Resolved, That the sum of ($2000.00) Two thousand dollars is hereby appropriated for the several objects herein before indicated except for porter’s lodge and gymnasium, and that said amount be used for said purposes as shall be deemed most advisable.

 

 

  1. See

minutes

p. 252. (left margin.)

  1. The Committee on Apparatus beg leave to submit their annual Report:

The condition of the Physical Apparatus under the care of the Prof. of Natural Philosophy, Col. L. H. Charbonnier, is in perfect working order and exhibits the vigilance, skill, and taste of the Professor to great advantage.  It is a treat to visit the rooms occupied by the Instruments.  There have been a great many minor repairs, during the year, made by the Professor’s own hands, without cost to the University, showing a vast amount of work done out side of the Lecture Room.

In addition to repairs, there have been several new pieces of Apparatus constructed by the Professor; among them a fine dipping Battery, worth in the market Sixty dollars, the materials of which cost fifteen dollars and which were paid for

 

 

 

(285)

July 1881.

out of the small appropriation to this Department of the University.  The Prof. has, in contemplation the construction of other pieces of apparatus, at odd moments, as he may find time, without interfering with his lecture room duties, which are performed with market skill and success, and with great benefit to the student.

                        This Department will require the sum of five hundred dollars, for the ensuing year to purchase apparatus greatly needed; for the funds furnished by the Legislature, a due proportion of which was devoted to Physical Apparatus, proved insufficient, with greatest care & economy, to buy all that was needed.  There are additional pieces which are essential.  Our present apparatus is undoubtedly very fine, and it should be our pride to keep it not only equal to, but ahead of other Southern Universities.

The additional pieces needed are mainly on the line of Apparatus for Electrical Measurements; and their practical application are found in Tellegraphing (sic) work, on testing Telephone Lines, &c.

There is needed also an improved Electric Machine.  Moisture in the atmosphere is a great obstacle to Electrical Experiments.  Within the past year a machine has been constructed, which over comes this difficulty, and enables the demonstrator to operate in any weather.  This new machine is only an improvement upon the one now in our Apparatus, and with a part of the appropriation herein urged, our Electrical Machine can be sent on and changed for the new style, without the great expense of an entirely new machine.  One more great need in our apparatus, to wit, a more powerful induction coil than we now have, can be supplied at a comparatively small cost.  For our Professor with wise forethought bought our present Induction Coil upon condition that he might exchange it for a larger one and be allowed full value provided it had received no damage.

 

(286)

Report No.2 of Committee on Laws & Discipline.

The Apparatus in the Department of Engineering is in the immediate charge of Prof. David C. Barrow Jr. and is in perfect order.

The Chemical Apparatus over which Prof. H. C. White presides with consumate(sic) skill & taste is all that the Board could desire as to arrangement, preservation and instruction.

                                                                        All of which is respectfully

submitted

                                                                        Wm. L. Mitchell.

                                                                                    Chairman.

  1. See

minutes

p. 253,

254, &

255. (left margin.)

  1. The Committee on Laws and Discipline report on the Supplemental message of the Chancellor the following resolutions:

1st.  Resolved, That the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts, of Philosophy, of Science, of Engineering, and of Law and Chemical Science, be conferred on the young men named in the report for each.

2nd.  That, the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred on Mr. Lawton B. Evans, he having here success fully completed the last year of studies and after passing part of his final examinations was prevented by severe illness from finishing the same we having assurances of his ample ability to stand such examinations satisfactorily.

3rd.  That four scholarships be granted to the Branch College at Milledgeville and two to the “Boys High School” at Albany, upon the same terms on which they have been granted to similar Institutions.

Report No. 4. Committee on Laws and Discipline

                        The Committee on Laws & Discipline on the subject of a change of the investments of the funds of the University and the appointment of a Committee to invoke special legislation thereon at this session of the General Assembly report adversely thereto and recommend the adoption of the following Resolution:

 

(287)

July 1881.

Resolved, That the Treasurer be instructed to reinvest such Bonds as may fall due before the next Annual Session and that other investments remain as they now stand.

Report No. 3 Committee on Laws & Discipline.

                        The Committee on Laws & Discipline have had under consideration the subject of free education at this University and report that the present is not an opportune time to consider a change so radical on account of the absence of so many of the Board, a small minority only being present, and recommend that action on this subject be postponed to the next Annual Session.

                        The Board having reconsidered these subjects and agreed unanimously to the resolutions submitted, respectively by Messrs. Hammond and Brown, the above Resolution as to reinvestments by the Treasurer of the Board will stand only upon the fact that the Legislature refuse our requests as made in said Resolutions of Messrs. Hammond and Brown.

 

  1. See

minutes

p. 255.

  1. To the Board of Trustees of the Un. of Ga.

The Finance Committee respectfully submit the following Report from the itemized account of the Treasurer from 8th of July 1880 to 8th July 1881 it appears that the receipts from all sources were _ _ _ _ __ _ __ _ __ _ _ _ _ $32061.80

Cash ballance (sic) July 8th 1880 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _7897.48

Total sum available for past year _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 39959.28

Disbursements during the same period _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 34710.86

Ehibiting (sic) Cash Ballance (sic) available

for the year 1881-82 including Library fees _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 5248.42

But as this Ballance (sic) is a mixed fund

it may be well to present a sagregated (sic)

statement, of it there belongs to the Land script Fund                                       $2204.81

To Genl. Franklin College Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  2430.61

To Library Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _613.00

 

 

 

 

(288)

Report of Committee on Finance.

(This may be left out in subsequent estimates as it is variable, specially raised and specifically appropriated to Library.)

Separate Statement of Land Script Fund.

Ballance (sic) to credit of Land Script Fund _ _ _ _ $2204.81

Annual income             “    “         “        “    _ _ _ _  17914.14

Aggregate sum available for 1881-82 _ _ _ _ _ _ _  20118.95

 

Disbursements.

For past year _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _ __ _$18524.00

Would leave July 1882 ballance (sic) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  1594.95

It may be remarked that in order to meet the demands of appropriations to the four Branch Aggricultural (sic) College the Land Script Fund was not charged by the appropriation by the Board for the half of the Chancellor’s & Treasurer’s Salaries a sum amounting to $2000.00  These manifestly legitimate charges upon the fund had they not been suspended would have reduced the ballance (sic) to the credit of this fund to the small sum of 204.81

 

Separate Statement of the Genl. Franklin College Fund.

Ballance(sic) to credit of this fund _ ____ __ _ $2430.61

Income for year to July 1882 estimated _ _ _ _ 13104.16

Aggregate sum available for 1881-82 _ _ _ _ _15,534.77

If the Disbursements for ensuing year should equal those of the past year from this fund, or be a need for them _ _ _ ____ _ _ ___ _ _ _$16186.86

there would be a difficiency (sic) of means to

meet the need of _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ ___ _ _ _ $ 432.09

The appropriation from this Fund should be

limited within its available means.

 

Your Committee submit estimates of Available means and recommend appropriations for expenditures as herein after stated for the fiscal year 1881-82

 

(289)

July 1881.

Available Means.

Cash Ballance(sic) (leaving out Library Fees) _ _ _ _ _ _ _$4635.42

Annual payment on debt due by State _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _8000.00

Interest on Genl. Franklin College Bonds _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  649.00

     “        “  Terrell Endowment _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ __ 1400.00

     “        “  Professors houses _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __  937.50

Tuition fees estimated _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __ _ 2000.00

Receipts from Prof. White State Analytic

Chemist for Chemicals & Gas _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  117.66

Interest on Land Script Fund _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _17914.14

Total available per estimate _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ _ 35653.72

Estimates for Expenditures 1881-82

Catalogues, Advertising & printing                                     $   540.00

Music $100.00 Servants hire $576                                             676.00

Postage $122, Stationary $50                                                     172.00

Fuel $102  Insurance $186, Medals $39                                     327.00

Chemicals $103, Incidentals $100                                               203.00

Repairs of Apparatus $50 Librarian $100                                   150.00

North Ga. Ag. Coll.                                                                  3500.00

South   “     “      “                                                                     2000.00

SouthWest “   “   “                                                                    2000.00

Middle  “  Milit. & Ag. Coll.                                                     2000.00

Salaries of Officers of the University                            19950.00

Repairs                                                                         2000.00

Dr. Boggs’, Sermon Commencement                                            20.00

To purchase of improvement for Apparatus                                 500.00

To Expense of Chancellor in visiting four Branch

Agricul. Colleges, if so much be necessary                                   100.00

Total Expenditures                                                                $34138.00

Total available                                                                        35653.72

Ballance(sic) unexpended July 1882                                          1515.72

Of which there belongs to Land Scrip(sic) Fund                          189.95

Ballance(sic) to credit of Genl. (Franklin College) Fund

July 1882                                                                                 1325.77

Of the foregoing expenditures, there shall be charged to the Land Scrip Fund as follows:

For Catalogues, Adv. & Printing _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  $270.00

For Music 50, for servants hire 376                                            426.00

 

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Report of Committee on Finance.

Postage and Stationary                                                             $ 86.00

Fuels, Medals, Chemicals, Incidentals, Repairs of

Apparatus, Librarian                                                                    247.00

North Ga. Ag. Coll.                                                                  3500.00

South   “     “      “                                                                     2000.00

Southwest  “     “     “                                                                2000.00

Middle  “   Mil & Ag.  “                                                            2000.00

Salaries of Officers as follows:

To Prof. Wm. M. Browne                                                        2000.00

  “     “    H. C. White                                                                1000.00

  “     “    L. H. Charbonnier                                                      1000.00

  “     “    C. P. Willcox                                                              1000.00

  “     “    Williams Rutherford                                                    1000.00

  “     “    E. W. Speer                                                               1000.00

  “     “    D. C. Barrow                                                            1600.00

To purchase farm horse, microscope & Barometer                       200.00

Half salary of Sec & Treasurer                                                   500.00

Expenses of Chancellor in visiting Branch Colleges

of Agriculture if so much be necessary                                          100.00

                                                                                             $19929.00

Total available                                                                         20118.95

Ballance(sic) to credit Land Script Fund 1882                           189.95

 

Assets of the University.

Your Committee present a statement of the assets of the University.

I  Land Script Fund.

Bonds of the State of Ga. 8 per cent interest,

payable April & October, which fall due April 1 1884                $96000.00

Bonds of the State of Ga. 7% interest payable Jan & July

Which all due July 1 1892                                                          56000.00

In the hands of the Governor paying 7% interest

Jany. & July                                                                              90202.17

Aggregating                                                                              $242202.17

II Terrell Endowment.

Bonds of the State of Ga., 7% interest payable

Jan & July which fall due $5.500 July 1 1886                             16000.00

$5500 Jany 1 1892.

 

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July 1881.

Bonds of the Ga. R. R. and Banking Co. 7% interest payable Jan & July, which fall due January 1 1882                                                                                    4000.00

Aggregating                                                                              20000.00

III  General (Franklin College) Fund.

Debt of the State of Ga. 8%                                                      $100000.00

Bonds of the  “     “   “   8 “ interest,

payable April & October which fall due April 1883                    3000.00

Bonds of Ga. R. R. and Banking Co., 7%

interest & payable Jany. & July which fall

due Jany 1st 1882                                                                       5000.00

Bonds of Clarke County 7% (optional) interests

payable Jany. & July                                                                     500.00

Bonds of the City of Athens, 8% interest

payable Jany & July, which fall due

July 1st 1898                                                                                 300.00

Aggregating _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __       108800.00

Total Investments                                                                    371002.17

Yielding an annual interest of                                                     27963.14

                                                Respectfully Submitted

                                                            Ben. C. Yancey, Chairman

                                                            Martin J. Crawford

  1. T. MacIntyre.

James H. Fannin

            Finance Committee.

  1. See

minutes

p. 255. (left margin.)

  1. Middle Ga. Military and Aggricultural (sic) College.

Resolved, That we proceed to elect a President of the Middle Ga. Military and Ag. College at Milledgeville who shall hold his office during the pleasure of this Board.

 

Resolved, That the Committee of five annually appointed by the Board to represent the interests of the University before the General Assembly together with any other Trustees that may at any time be present during the present session of that Body be instructed to cooperate with the Trustees of the North Ga.

 

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Supplemental Report of Finance Committee.

Agricultural College in urging the General Assembly of the State to pass the Bill now pending which proposes to appropriate 20000.00 to rebuild the College edifice at Dahlonega destroyed by fire.

 

Resolved, That the persons elected Subordinate teachers by the several Branch college are approved and rattified (sic) by this Board.

 

Resolved, That the local Board of Trustees of the Southwest Ga. Ag. College are hereby authorized and empowered to make sale of the land on which the building recently burned stood at their discretion and apply the proceeds of the sale as is indicated in the annual report of the President of the Local Board of Trustees.

 

2nd  That we leave the selection of other teachers of the Branch Colleges to the Local Boards of Trustees subject to the approval of this Board until we shall otherwise order.

 

  1. See

minutes

p. 255. (left margin.)

  1. To the Board of Trustees of the Univ. of Ga.

The Finance Committee have thought proper to make a Supplemental Report on the subject of the late Gift of Mr. Charles F. McCay resident of Baltimore, Md.

As known to the Board it was a gift of twenty thousand dollars in Bonds of the Ga. R. R. and Banking Co., Twenty Bonds of One thousand dollars each bearing 6% interst (sic), the coupons upon the same till 1st July 1895 being cut off and retained by the donor.  These Bonds are to be sealed up and not opened till 1st July 1895 eight of them fall due July 1897; twelve of them fall due July 1910.  The coupons thereon when collected to be invested in interest bearing investments and the principal when collected

 

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July 1881.

to be likewise invested, compounding all and no part thereof to be used till after the lapse of twenty one years of the last survivor of twenty six children, named in his deed, which is a record upon your minutes, The numbers of these Bonds are entered upon your minutes & duplicate copies thereof are said by the Secretary and Treasurer deposited, one in the vault of the Southern Mutual Insurance Co., in their office in Athens, Ga. and the other in the vault of the National Bank at Athens, Ga.  The Bonds are represented by the Secretary & Treasurer to be deposited in the vault of the National Bank in Athens, Ga.  Sealed up with his official Signature upon the envellope (sic) attested by some members of the Prudential Committee, endorsed thereon “Not to be opened till July 1895.”  This action & endorsement are in accordance with Report of Messrs. Gresham & Billups to whom was committed the negociation (sic) with the donor and receive his gift.

Your Committee respectfully ask the Board to recind (sic) its action in the adoption of said Report so far as relates to not opening and examining said package of Bonds till 1895.

It is well that the Finance Committee of this Board should annually open said package to see if the Bonds are there and report to the Board at its annual session.

Upon being examined and found right, shall be resealed and superscribed (sic) by said Committee and the Secretary & Treasurer,

                                                            Respectfully Submitted,

                                                                        Ben C. Yancey Chairman.

 

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Commencement Programme.

  1. See

minutes

p. 254

& 256. (left margin.)

  1. Resolved, That the Prudential Committee in cooperation with the Chancellor be requested to consider the expediency of making some changes in the Commencement exercise, such as having Monday devoted to Sophomore & Junior speeches.  The Sophomores in the morning, The Juniors at night.  Tuesday to be Society day and to be set apart for such exercises of the Literary Societies Demosthenian and Phi Kappa and the Alumni Society.  The Annual oration to be at 4 o’clock Tuesday and the Alumni Oration at night, with such particulars as can be gotten up in connection with the other exercises.  Wednesday to be Commencement with the usual exercises.  This resolution intended to be suggestive only, to the Chancellor and Prudential Committee.

If the Committee and Chancellor shall agree upon and approve the above suggestions they shall publish the same in the notice of the next Annual Commencement.

 

  1. See

minutes

pp. 256. (left margin.)

a.  Convention at Rome Resolved, That the Chancellor be requested to attend the State Agricultural in August and the fair of the State Agricultural Society at Macon in October and to visit such other places as he may deem advisable and practicable, for the purposes in view, - to address the convention and Assemblies of the people upon the Character and advantages of the education afforded at the University, upon the value and importance to the Agriculture of the State of forming and perfecting a close union between the convention the department of Agriculture of the State and the department of Agricultural instruction in the University and upon such other kindred topics as may be suggested by the main object in view, the extension and efficiency of the subjects above mentioned.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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July 1881.

And Resolved, further that his expenses be paid out of any monies in the treasury not otherwise appropriated.

                                                                                    By order of the Board

                        Wm. L. Mitchell                                               John J. Gresham

                                    Secretary.                                             President

 

Mr. Emory Speer was elected Alumni Trustee for four years, beginning the day after the first Wednesday of August 1881, and ending with the first Wednesday of August 1885, and so officially communicated by the Secretary of the Alumni Society.

 

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(Blank page.)

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University of Georgia.

                                                                                    July 14th, 1882.

The Trustees of the University of Georgia met in stated annual convention, this morning at 10 o’clock.

In the absence of the President & Vice President, Dr. H. V. M. Miller the oldest Trustee present took the Chair as required by the Charter. Upon calling the roll it appeared that a quorum was in attendance, and prayer for the blessing of Almighty God upon the Trustees and the University in all its interests, was made by the Chancellor Rev. P. H. Mell DD. LL. D

The members of the Board present at the opening of the meeting were Dr. Miller, Chairman, Messrs. James Jackson, Crawford, Hall, Cobb, MacIntyre, Brown, Yancey, Mitchell and Thomas.  There were present upon subsequent days Messrs. Billups, Lewis, Vason, Pierce, Barrow, Colquitt, Toombs, Cooper, Stephens, Gresham, Screven, Lawton, and Byrd.

Excuses were made for absence for Messrs. Harris, Felton, & Beckwith.

A letter from Mr. Jenkins was read declaring his resignation as a Trustee and expressing his abiding interest in the University, and high regard for the members of the Board, and avering (sic) his age and infermity (sic) as rendering him unfit for such duties which could be better performed by a younger man.  His resignation was accepted.

The Chancellor then read his Annual communication, which with the accompanying documents was referred to the Committee on Laws & Discipline & the other standing Committees to which the topics properly belong.

 

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The Minutes of the 15th.

The Chair then appropriated the Standing Committee on Laws & Discipline to wit, James Jackson, Chairman Messrs. Hall, Billups, MacIntyre, Lawton, and Yancey.

The petition of the Senior through their President asking for an appropriation of fifteen dollars, to pay for music at their Champion debate to night was presented through Dr. Mell and on motion of Mr. James Jackson was granted.

 

Mr. Mitchell, Chairman of the Standing Committee on Apparatus read his Report which was laid on the table for the present.

Mr. Thomas chairman of the Standing Committee on Finance, submitted his Report, which was also laid on the table for the present.

He also read the Report of Mr. Harris, Chairman of the Standing Committee on Buildings and grounds, which in like manner was laid on the table.

The Abstract of the minutes of the Prudential Committee for the past Collegiate year was read and with the minutes laid on the table for inspection and use.

The Board then adjourned to meet, tomorrow morning at nine o’clock.

 

                                                                                    July 15th, 1882

The Board met according to adjournment.

Messrs. Billups, Lewis, Vason, Pierce, Barrow Colquitt, Byrd and Stephens appeared and took their seats.

The minutes of yesterday were read and confirmed.  The invitation to the Chancellor’s reception was accepted and also the invitation to the Senior Class exercises before the Chapel.

Gov. Joseph E. Brown made a statement of his intention to donate the sum of Fifty

 

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July 1882.

thousand dollars to the Trustees of the University of Georgia upon certain terms and for certain purposes which he had reduced to writing and which writing at his request was read by Mr. James Jackson, and on motion of Mr. Stephens was referred to a special Committee of five, appointed by the Chair, to wit: Messrs. Stephens, Chairman, Lawton, Vason, Pierce, & Billups. Mr. Humber, representing the M. Ga. M. and Ag. College was introduced and read the Report of that Branch College.

Mr. Thomas read the Report of the S. W. Ga. Ag. College, our Branch College at Cuthbert.

These Reports were referred to the Standing Committee on Branch Colleges now appointed by the Chair, to wit: Mr. Colquitt Chairman, Messrs. Hall, MacIntyre, Byrd, and Barrow.

Mr. Humber distributed to each member of the Board, a printed petition for the appointment of a Trustee of the University residing at Milledgeville.

The Standing Committee on Agriculture and Horticulture was appointed by the Chair and consists of Mr. Lewis, Chairman, Messrs. Barrow, Screven and Livingston to which was referred the Report of Mr. Yancey, Chairman, of the former Committee on the Experimental farm.

The Chairman, appointed Messrs. Cobb & Thomas the Committees to invite distinguished strangers to the stage.

The Board their adjourned to 4 o’clock P.M.

                                                                        July 15th 1882 4 o’clock P.M.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Messrs. Gresham and Toombs appeared and took their seats.

The Report of the N. Ga. Ag. College at

 

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The Minutes of 17th.

Dahlonega, was presented and referred to the Committee on Branch Colleges.  The Report of The Special Committee of five on the donation of Gov. Brown was unanimously adopted and a Committee as therein Contemplated was appointed by the Chair, to wit:  Messrs. Mitchell, Thomas, Hammond, Crawford, and MacIntyre. The Chancellor’s Report in relation to Paintings by Mr. Habersham and also in relation to the Committee on Honorary Degrees was adopted and Messrs. Lawton, and Cobb appointed for this Commencement.

The Degree of A. B. conferred upon Rev. Mr. Tenney of Texas a former student of the University and whose career was interrupted by the war as the same has been done by other members of his class.  The Report of Standing Committee of Laws and Discipline was adopted after reading and explanation by Mr. James Jackson.

The Board then adjourned to Monday Morning at 9 o’clock A. M.

                                                                        July 17th, 1882

The Board met according to adjournment.

Mr. Cooper and Mr. Screven appeared & took their seats.  Mr. Cooper Vice president assumed the Chair.

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

Mr. Billups was appointed on the Committee on Brance (sic) Colleges in place of Mr. Colquitt absent. Dr. Miller was appointed Chairman of the Committee on Laws and Discipline in place of James Jackson who was compelled to return home on account of ill health.

Mr. Gresham submitted resolutions which were adopted in relation to the donation of Mr. Charles F. McCay’s donation.

Mr. Lawton on behalf of the Committee on Honorary Degrees, submitted a Report on the subject of

 

(301)

July 1882.

Honorary Degrees to be conferred on Walton Leconte Stevens and Wm. M. Hammond, and the Rule was suspended and the degrees then conferred upon each by separate votes as recommended, to wit:  the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy on Walter LeConte Stevens and the Honorary Degree of Master of Arts on Wm. M. Hammond.

Board took a recess to attend the Sophomore Exhibition and then returned and ajourned (sic) to 4 o’clock P. M.

                                                            July 17th 1882 4 o’clock P. M.

The Board met according to adjournment. Mr. Mitchell’s three Resolutions as to Commencement to 4th Wednesday of June &c. referred to Committee on Laws & Discipline.

vio.(?) p. 350. (left margin.)

Mr. Cobb’s resolution on speaking twice each term was referred to same Committee.

On motion of Mr. Vason the election of a Trustee to fill the vacancy of Mr. Jenkin’s was made the order of the day for tomorrow at 9 ½ o’clock A. M.

Mr. Cooper had leave of absence after today.

The Board then adjourned to tomorrow at 9 o’clock A. M.

                                                            July 18th 1882.

The Board met according to adjournment.

Dr. Miller Senior Trustee took the Chair.

The order of the day to wit: the election of Trustee was taken up and upon counting the ballots it appeared that Mr. Joseph B. Cumming of Augusta was duly elected.

Mr. Gresham was unanimously elected President of the Board and at once took the Chair which was tendered him by the presiding Trustee, and Mr. Gresham made remarks appropriate to assuming the Chair.

The President was authorized to sign all the unsigned minutes nunc pro tunc so as to

 

 

 

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The Minutes of the 18th.

fully authenticate them.

Dr. Dudley’s resignation as President of the M. Ga. Mil. And Ag. College at Milledgeville was accepted.

The Board then took a recess to attend the Societies and hear the honorary member Mr. Black of Augusta and to return to the Library at the close of the Speaking.

The Board at the close of Mr. Black’s Speech returned to the Library.

Mr. Vason introduced Resolutions in relation to the Professor of Belles Letters & Oratory for the purpose of moving their reference to the Committee on Laws & Discipline by their Chairman Dr. Miller made their Report which was taken up, and on motion of Mr. Vason its recommendations were adopted.

The Committee returned the Resolutions in relation to the Professor of Belles Letters & Oratory without Reporting thereon.

And on motion of Mr. Vason the said Resolutions were taken up and the following substitute in lieu thereof by Mr. Lawton was adopted, and is as follows:

Resolved,

            That in the opinion of this Board the duties of the Professorship of Belles Letters and Oratory are not satisfactorily performed by the present incumbent, and the Presiding Officer of this Board is requested to make this known to the Professor.

Mr. Billups submitted the following Resolution which was adopted.

Resolved, That should the Legislature at its next session, make an appropriation in aid of the University, the Prudential Committee is authorized and instructed to add Fifteen

 

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July 1882.

hundred dollars or so much as the said appropriation may authorize in addition to the two thousand dollars mentioned in report of Committee on Finance to the College at Dahlonega.  Messrs. Lawton, Vason, and Screven were excused after this meeting.

The Board then adjourning till after the meeting of the Alumni Society this afternoon.

 

                                                            July 18th, Afternoon Session.

The Board met according to adjournment at the close of the Alumni society and remained in session till after night.

Mr. Yancey Chairman of the Standing Committee on Agriculture & Horticulture, moved to take up his Report and adopt the same which was agreed to.

Mr. Mitchell Chairman of the Standing Committee on Apparatus moved to take up his Report which was amended on motion of Mr. Cobb by striking out so much as relates to the appropriation of $500.00 and the Report as thus amended was adopted.

On motion of Mr. Mitchell, the Board conferred the several Degrees recommend in the Chancellor’s Annual Communication. Mr. Thomas Chairman of the Finance Committee moved to take up his Report & adopt the same: when Mr. Yancey moved to amend the Report by striking out $1500.00 of the appropriation to the Brance (sic) College at Dahlonega and so make her allowance $2000.00 like the other Branch Colleges which was agreed to and the Report as thus amended was adopted. On motion of Mr. Toombs the Committee of five to represent the interests of the University before the Legislature was instructed to apply to the

 

(304)

The Minutes of the 19th.

next General Assembly for such aid as we need; which motion was agreed to.

Mr. Hall Chairman of the Standing Committee on Branch colleges made his Report which was adopted.

The Board then adjourned to meet tomorrow morning at 9 o’clock.

                                                                                    July 19th 1882

Board met according to adjournment.

The minutes of the last meeting were read and confirmed.

The Degree of Dr. of Jurisprudence was conferred in course on James Whitehead Esq. of Warrenton, Ga. and on Saml. G. McLendon Esq. of Thomasville, Ga.

Prof. Speer sent in his resignation to take effect next Commencement and it was accepted to take effect on Jany. 1st, 1883.

Mr. Billups moved that when the Board adjourns, it adjourn to meet in Atlanta on the 2nd, Wednesday of November next at 3 o’clock of that day, and then & there to elect a Professor of Belles Letters & Oratory and that the Secretary be instructed to advertise said election, which motion was agreed to.  The Board congratulates Chancellor Mell upon his success in obtaining Portraits for the Art Gallery and request him to return their thanks to the respective donors, and exhorts him to persevere in his efforts in this direction and he will continue to be encouraged by future successes.

He is also requested to acknowledge in the name of the Board contributions to the Museum.

Mr. Hall submitted the following paper which was adopted unanimously by a rising vote.

 

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July 1882.

We miss our valued friend Bery. H. Hill, from the seat which he has occupied at this Board for many years.  We miss his wise council, pleasant association and genial manners which have won our admiration, respect and esteem.  We deeply deplore the cause of his absence and sympathizing cordially with him in his affliction trust that a Merciful Providence may soon restore him to his family to his country, and this Board. Mr. Lewis submitted the following resolution which was adopted.

Resolved, That the Prudential Committee be instructed to inform the Board of the Branch College at Milledgeville, that before any appropriation which this Board may make now or hereafter to the College at Milledgeville, will be paid, this Board requires that the Board at Milledgeville shall take action and communicate the same officially to this Board, said action, to state that the said Board at Milledgeville distinctly recognize the power to elect the President of the College at Milledgeville as existing and vesting in this Board and this Board alone.

The Board then adjourned to meet in Atlanta as already provided

                                                                        John J. Gresham Prest.

                                                                        University of Georgia

                                                                                    July 14th 1882

To the Board of Trustees

                                    University of Georgia

                                                            Gentlemen,

                                                                        I have the honor herewith to present my Report for the Collegiate year now closing.

 

Number of Students.

During the current year there have matricula-

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

-ted in the Department at Athens, One hundred and forty six (146) students viz: In Franklin College Ninety one (91); In the State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts Forty three (43); and in the Law School, Twelve (12).

Numbers of all those who have received instruction in the various Departments of the University during the Collegiate Year.

In Franklin College _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _91

In State College of Agriculture & Mechanic Arts _ _ _ _ _ _ 43

In Law Department _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 12

Total in all the Departments at Athens _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 146.

(as against 155 reported last year)

In Medical Department _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _85

(as against 127 reported last year)

In North Ga. Agricultural College Males 128 }

                                                      Females 49 }_ _ _ _ _ _ _177

(as against 267 reported last year)

South Georgia Agricultural College All Males _ _ _ _ _ _ _185

(as against 217, last year)

In South West Ga. Agricultural Col. All Males _ _ _ _ _ _  155

(as against 155 last year)

In Mid. Ga. M. & Ag. College Males 181 }

                                              Females 174 } Total_ _ _ _ _  355

(as against 388 last year)

 Total of those receiving instruction in all Departments _  1103

(as against 1279 last year)

It will appear then that in all of the

Departments there has been a loss of _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _176

as compared to the Report last Commencement.

Statement of Comparative losses.

The Departments at Athens have lost _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _9

The Medical Department loses _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  42

The Branch College at Dahlonega loses _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _90

The Branch College at Thomasville _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _32

The Branch College at Milledgeville loses _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  33

The Branch College at Cuthbert reports a gain over last year of 30 students.

The Law Department here also gains 7 over last year.  Franklin College loses one (1) student and the State College thirteen (13) as compared to last year.

College Grade.

Of the pupils reported, there are of College grade

In Department at Athens _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _146

In Department at Augusta _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _85

(as against 127, last year)

In College at Dahlonega _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _48

(same as reported last year)

In the College at Thomasville _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _14

(as against 24, last year)

In the College at Cuthbert _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _25

(as against 15 last year)

In the College at Milledgeville _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 37

(as against 73 last year)

Total of Col. Grade in all Departs. & Colleges _ _ _ _ _ _ 355

(as against 442 last year) making a loss of _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 87

as compared to last year.

Undergraduates.

Excluding the Law and Medical Departments, it will be seen that, of the College Grade, there are undergraduates -

In the Departments at Athens                                                134

(as against 160, last year)

In all the Branch College                                                       124

(as against 160, last year)

Of these 124, all are of the grade of Sophomores and Freshmen, excepting 17 at Dahlonega _ viz:  6 Seniors and 11 Juniors.

Total undergraduate of College grade                       258

(as against 308, last year) making a loss

in our whole University system of fifty (50)

undergraduate of College grade.

Numbers in Attendance.

No doubt it is a matter of regret and perhaps of disappointment to all, that under the free tuition plan our numbers instead of increasing have slightly diminished.  I trust that the Board will make a thorough exam-

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

-ination into the causes of the disappointment and unhesitatingly apply the corrective to the fault, if it exists here, whether in the shape of persons or things.  I may be permitted to say though.

  1. That the difficulty did not originate in any discords here. Perfect harmony reigned in the Faculty and between the Professors and the students.  We have never had a year so far as the students are concerned, more marked by orderly deportment and diligent attention to duties.
  2. The Branch Colleges have been our competitors, not feeders to us.  Of the one hundred and sixty College Students they reported last year, only five have applied here, four from Thomasville and one from Cuthbert.  The Board will remember that in my first communication after the vote inaugurating the Branch Colleges, I put on record my opinion that it was vain to expect large numbers here now.  I am not criticizing or dissenting from the policy of the Board.  I am only stating its inevitable effect on the numbers here.
  3. Nearly of the young men intending to go to College had committed themselves to the various Institutions before it was possible for us to announce free tuition since His Excellency the Governor, had signed the legislative act but a few days before the opening of our term.  The great body of our students knew nothing about it until after their arrival here. So far as I can ascertain, two young men from South Carolina are the only students drawn here by free tuition.  I have had though many letters during the year from other states and the indications are that not a few young men will be drawn here next year from those regions.

 

(309)

July 1882.

Temporarily, our free tuition feature may have furnished an occasion for the exercise of our influence tending to diminish our numbers.  The friends of other colleges in the state were stimulated to make desperate efforts to counteract the effect of your free tuition which from legislative action they saw to be impending.  And I am sorry to say that we did not receive from some a competition that was generous.  By Agents conversing the entire state, attacks were made upon us not only in the private circles, but from the pulpits in all sections of the Commonwealth. Our scholarship was disparaged; infidelity and irreligion charged against us; most exaggerated accounts given of extravagant living with our students and parents were persuaded to believe that immorality and vice reigned rampant here.  No wonder that these statements exerted an influence; for parents would be both to believe that one wearing the ministerial garb would make charges so grave without a personal knowledge of their truth. With great reluctance, and after long delay, I gained my consent to (virtually) reply to these charges through the public press.  But the mischief had been done, so far as the current year is concerned.  It remains to be seen whether the same unscrupulous methods can be successful for subsequent years.

  1. Our numbers were certainly somewhat affected by the fact that more than a score of the students of the previous year failed to make a rise with their class. The Sophomore class was composed to a singular degree of young men who either could not, or cared not to master the topics in the course. To these the Professors offered the privilege of another examina-

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

-tion at the opening of the present year.  Very few however availed themselves of the privilege.  To progress in numbers we must not only make acquisitions of new students, but retain to graduation the old.  This to an extraordinary degree, we failed to do during the last two years.

  1. The excitement consequent upon the murder of one of the students and the foolish misapprehension that there was a fend between students and negroes, prevented some from reporting here who had expected to do so.  It will be seen though that the Departments here lost less with one exception, than the Branch Colleges whose statistics are given above. The gain though at Cuthbert was to be expected; since a vigorous opposition school ceased to exist about the beginning of the collegiate year.

Commencement Programme.

At the last meeting the Board adopted the following Resolution:  “Resolved, That the Prudential Committee in cooperation with the Chancellor be requested to consider the expediency of making some changes in the Commencement Exercises, such as having Monday devoted to Sophomore and Junior speeches - that Sophomores in the morning, the Juniors at night, Tuesday to be society day, and to be set apart for such exercises of the Literary Societies, Demosthenian and Phi Kappa and the Alumni Society.  The Annual Oration to be at 11 o’clock Tuesday and the Alumni Oration at night - with such particulars as can be gotten up in connection with the other exercises.  This Resolution intended to be suggestive only to the Chancellor and Prudential Committee.”

“If the Committee and Chancellor shall agree upon and approve the above suggestions, they shall

 

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publish the same in the notice of the next Annual Commencement.”

Supposing that the Board did not intend to suggest the discontinuance of the Chancellor’s Reception on Tuesday night, we have ventured to transfer the Alumni Oration from that time to 4 o’clock P.M. of that day, and have advertised it as the programme for the present occasion.  There are in our minds though grave objections to the plan even as thus modified.

  1. It gives the Sophomore, a lower class, a better time than the Juniors, a higher class. It also discriminates against the Alumni Orator in favor of the Orator before the Literary Societies.
  2. It makes Tuesday the day for the Societies and the Alumni Association both. As all the Alumni belong to one or the other of the Literary Societies, there can be no meeting that day for one of those organizations.  But one it is true could meet on Monday P.M.  In that case though there would be no propriety in calling Tuesday Society and Alumni Day.

We propose for your consideration, and adoption if it meets your views, the following programme for the future.

                  }10 A.M.  Baccalaureate Sermon

Sunday       }8 ½ P.M. Sermon or adress (sic) before

                  }Students Prayer Meeting Society.

 

                  }10 A.M.  Address before Literary Societies

                  } 4 P.M.  Meeting of Societies

                  } 8 ½ P.M.  Six original speeches in the

                  } Chapel.  Each Literary Society to elect three of

Monday     } its own members, of the undergraduates, not

                  } Seniors.  The speeches like those of the Seniors

                  } to be approved by the Prof. of Belles Letters and

                  } practiced before him & the public exhibition to be pre-

                  } sided over by the Chancellor.

 

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                        } 10  Alumni Adress (sic).

                        } 4 P.M.  Meeting of Alumni

                        } 8 ½ P.M.  To be left open.  It will furnish an

      Tuesday     } occasion for a social reunion at the Chancel

     Alumni day} lor’s Mansion for all the friends of the University

                        } male and female, or of the Alumni and dis-

                        } –tinguished visitors at Alumni Banquet at some suitable place.

 

     Wednesday}  Commencement day i.e. Senior Exhibition.

 

This plan omits Junior & Sophomore exhibitions entirely, at Commencement.

In this we would follow the lead of all the important Universities and Colleges to the east of us.  Harvard and Yale and Brown and Williams and Amherst & Princeton and Chapel Hill and others have all many years ago dissevered from Commencement Junior and Sophomore Exhibitions, and referred them to another Season of the year.

A Sophomore Exhibition brings us down to the level of all the Academics and Neighborhood schools in the country; and it is worthy of consideration whether it should be continued longer.  Under the usage that has for a long time and for some reason unknown to me prevailed here, the declamations of schools and other Colleges here, the declamations of schools and other Colleges will always excell (sic) our Sophomore Exhibition in variety and therefore, to audiences generally in brilliancy and interest.  Our students have discovered and it is the subject of remark in the University Community that those who award the prizes never confer them upon those who speak humorous or dramatic pieces.  The general rule therefore is that only grave rhetorical speeches are delivered on our stage.  The effect therefore in the opinion of the great body of

 

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hearers is monotony, if not dullness.

This, it is true, may be remedied by formally, by enactment, making these three kinds of presentation of equal grade: or by giving three medals, one for the best speaker in each class - provided, the best speaker rises to a grade worthy of commendation.

There are many reasons in favor of the plan recommended.

  1. In the first place, it would be different from any thing in Georgia, called Commencement, not to mention female Seminaries, six Collegiate Institutions and a multitude of High Schools and Academics in Georgia hold so called Commencements, modeled after the plan now in vogue here.  Unfortunately, ours is the last in the series, and the people come here, surfeited and jaded by exhibitions of the kind. It is of the first importance then that our exercises should be sui generis - that they should be of such character as to distinguish us from all other Literary Institutions in the State.
  2. The plan if adopted will dignify the occasion by giving prominence to distinguished men.  If it be objected that it is questionable whether we have within reach distinguished men in sufficient numbers to make it sure that orators can be secured for Monday and Tuesday A.M. for all the future; it may be answered that there is no danger of failing to secure the men if we can offer to them occasions worthy to tempt their acceptance, Gentlemen will come here from distant states if we can offer them appointments that will attract to them public attention and give to them dignified and impressive occasions for enunciating their

 

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convictions, and thus operating on the public mind. Under the system hitherto in vogue here the wonder is that distinguished gentlemen have ever consented to accept the obscure positions and inconvenient hours that have been tendered to them.  It is admitted that a gentleman accepting the position may fail at the last hour; but the danger will be greatly diminished by the increased dignity of the appointment and it may be entirely obviated by the appointment of an alternate who may be the principal for the succeeding year, should his services not be called in requisition as an alternate.  But that in the event that the Orator shall fail to meet his engagement, the occasion need not suffer any disaster on that account. The Societies on Society day, and the Alumni on Alumni day, can very readily utilize the day for the advancement of their important interests.

  1. The plan will make commencement so far as students are concerned, preeminently a Senior Exhibition.  It is granted that it would have less effect to draw here the friends of the young men, and it would tend less than the present system to hold the great body of students here up to Commencement and both may be modified by the increased interest and dignity given to the closing exercises.  By the proposed plan all the students will have important parts to perform in connection with the Literary Societies, and will have inducements therefore to remain.
  2. The plan proposed will intensify, and thus cultivate the Literary Societies, and the Society of the Alumni.  To the former Monday - morning

 

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afternoon and night - is appropriated exclusively.  In the forenoon they escort their Orator to the Chapel in the afternoon, they hold session in which they may be addressed by their Alumni and honorary members; and at night representatives chosen by themselves deliver original speeches from the Chapel rostrum.  The Alumni Society would have the whole of Tuesday to devote to their purposes.  It is greatly to be regretted that a power so potent cannot be systematically utilized in the interest of the University.  Under our present system, when they meet as a deliberative body, they have time only to fill the annual vacancy in the Board of Trustees.  But with the whole of Tuesday devoted to them they could have time to consider and act upon practical plans looking to the increased prosperity of the University in all its departments and operations & the Chancellor would unhesitatingly discontinue his Receptions should they desire to crown the day with an Alumni Banquet.  Should the Board adopt the programme here offered, it would be well to provide for Junior and Sophomore Exhibitions at another time.  The Committee & Chancellor recommend that these exhibitions be held in April of Each year, the Junior at 10 ½ o’clock of the Second Wednesday in April and the Sophomores at 8 ½ o’clock P.M. of Tuesday the day before.  The Sophomore prizes to be delivered at the close of the Junior Exhibition by the Prof. of Belles Letters or by some one appointed by him.

The Faculty unanimously concur with the Prudential Committee in recommending the above programme.

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

Class Day.

To vary the proceedings and to further interest the students in Commencement, the Faculty, with the concurrence of the Prudential Committee have assigned Saturday to the Seniors as their Class day.  It is hoped that they will have many interesting exercises and ceremonies, the effect of which in part, will be, that they will leave upon the Campus something that will serve to be a permanent memorial of the Class.

All the great Institutions in the country have Class Days, the effect of which has been not only to give additional interest to the Commencement occasion, but to bind the retiring student by an additional tie to the Alma Mater. In the first attempt the young men may not attain to all possible success; but they are entitled to, and no doubt will receive, the forbearance and encouragement of all their friends who witness their efforts.

Should the Trustees however object to the feature, they are respectfully requested to express their dissent, and it will be omitted for the future.

Champion Debate.

It has been a custom for many years for the two Literary Societies to conduct a Champion Debate on Monday night of Commencement.  I do not know the origin of this custom.  Supposing though that the Trustees by assigning Monday night to the Junior Exhibition did not intend formally to abolish the Champion Debate any more than by assigning Tuesday night to the Alumni Orator, they intended to indicate objection to the Chancellor’s Reception.  I took the liberty to authorize the students to select for this purpose any unappropriated night.  They have decided to

 

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July 1882.

hold their Debate then on Friday night.

I respectfully ask the Board to indicate its wishes in this matter, should the plan recommended by the Prudential Committee and the Faculty be adopted, representatives from the Societies will appear upon the stage on Monday night.  In that event it may be well for the Board formally to abolish and prohibit the Champion Debate.  This I present as a suggestion not as a formal recommendation.

Meetings of the Societies.

By both programmes that are before you, Monday P.M. is set apart for the Meetings of the Literary Societies.  It is very desirable that all their Alumni and honorary members present, should meet with them on that occasion.  In this I respectfully ask the cooperation of the Board of Trustees as a body & as individuals.

Students Homes.

The Dormitores (sic) have been largely occupied as boarding houses by the students during the past year; and the ladies controlling them have managed with consumate(sic) ability and success.

Supply of Water on the Campus.

The water on the Campus has been deficient in quantity and is very bad in quality.  I respectfully call the attention of the Board to the accompanying communication of Prof. White, who has subjected the waters of the various wells to chemical analysis.  Large numbers of students room upon the Campus whose health is seriously jeopardized by the water the (sic) are compelled to drink.

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

Public Addresses by the Chancellor.

Obeying the instructions of the Board, I attended the meetings of the State Agricultural Society at Rome and Augusta, and also its Fair held in Macon.  By invitation I address the meeting at Rome, on the character, condition and claims of the University.

A few days after by special request I addressed on the same subject the General Assembly of the State at Atlanta.  I was in hopes that the Alumni in the various important localities of the State would formally invite me to address their several communities.  A representative of the University of Georgia has no pulpit or platform by which to reach the people, in its interests.  Friends in the different localities must give the invitation, furnish the facilities and create the feeling of interest; for nothing but failure can be expected to befall one’s unaided effort to address a community on a theme so unsensational as University education.  But all intimations modestly given by me or propositions unequivocally made by others, failed to elicit a response.

Art Gallery.

A number of the members of the Board have promised to furnish us Portraits of themselves; but not a few have received my application in silence.  I beg again at in this connection to repeat my request; and to ask the cooperation of the Board in attaining an object so desirable.  I am happy to say that a superb Portrait of Ex. Gov. Jenkins and another of Chief Justice Joseph H. Lumpkin deceased, now adorn our walls - the former the gift of the Governor himself - the latter presented by the family of the Judge.

 

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July 1882.

The Campus.

Besides planting out some forest trees, and some exotics, which Mr. Berkmans was kind enough to bring to us, nothing has been done towards further improvement of the Campus.  The servant whom the Prudential Committee were authorized to hire, has kept the grounds in comparative order.

They greatly need a system of drainage; and for lack of suitable walks, between Moore College and other Buildings, students in the winter have to bog their way between one Lecture room and another.  A small portion of the grounds have not yet been graded & sodded.  I respectfully ask that these improvements, if possible, be carried at once to completion.

The Library.

Prof. Wilcox the Librarian, has kept in admirable order this important part of the University.  His Report which I have the honor to present informs you that 260 volumes have been added during the past year.

The Museum.

                                                                                    Is now arranged in attractive and useful form.  Prof. White whose Report I have the honor herewith to present, informs us that valuable contributions have been added to it during the past year by a generous friend.

Medical Department.

It was my privilege to attend the Commencement of the Medical Department of the University this year, and to confer the Degree of Doctor of Medicine on 24 Graduates.  The Department shows marked signs of prosperity in spite of the

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Chancellor’s Report.

fact that its numbers have somewhat diminished.

Centennial Celebration.

I beg leave respectfully to remind the Board that, though the University of Georgia did not go into actual operation until the year 1801, the act creating it was passed in 1785, and was approved on the 29th day of January of that year.  This act granted a charter to certain persons mentioned by name as the Trustees of an Institution to be called, “The University of Georgia.”  I design in this merely to spring the inquiries; will the year 1885 be the hundredth anniversary of the University of Georgia?  and if so, will it be expedient to commence arrangements for a “Centennial Celebration” in the year 1885?

It may be supposed however that these questions are already answered in the negative, in the fact that the authorities have already carried into effect a semi-centennial celebration not in harmony with the present suggestion and inquiry.

Department of Technology.

I have had the honor of conversing with distinguished members of the Board of Trustees on the subject of the formal establishment of a Department of Technology here, an thoughtful members of the Alumni have opened correspondence with me on the same subject.  Besides the public press & many public speakers have time and again, expressed a desire for an institution devoted to practical education.  The fact seems not to be known by the public generally but it is true, that we already have in actual operation here the most important parts of a Technological institute.  All that is necessary to make the system complete is for the Board to found here a Work shop.

 

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July 1882.

A Technological Institute, is a school in which practical arts, are taught as already intimated.  The University has now in active operation four of the Departments which make up such an Institute, viz: Physics, Chemistry, Engineering and Agriculture.  In each of these Departments, in addition to the old theoretical course of instruction, we have a practical course, in which students are made to perform actual work.  This is strictly true of the three first named departments.  The work done in them by students is manual work in which the theoretical instruction given in the Lecture Room is practically carried out and illustrated by the student, who after completing his course is a physicist; a chemist or an Engineer, or all combined if he has had the time and talent to become familiar with each (crossed out in pencil) of (crossed out in pencil) the branches severally (inserted in pencil).  In agriculture, the student, it is true, does not perform manual labor, but he has the opportunity to see it done.

To complete our scheme it would be necessary to have added to the foregoing departments, an industrial school, or rather, workshop.  In this a young man would be trained to the actual use of tools.

The equipment of such a workshop can be carried to an almost infinite degree; for a complete equipment should be capable of illustrating every process of every kind of manufacture.  But in its beginning it should have a good set of wood working tools - such as ordinary carpenters tools, wood plowing machines, circular & band saws, morticing (sic) machines &c.  In the next place it should possess a good set of metal working tools, such as are found in an ordinary machine

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

and Foundry establishment. These two sets of equipment, with a steam engine to furnish the necessary power, would be the foundation, upon which any enlargement in the way of special machines can afterwards be laid.  These equipments (sic) should be under charge of a practical man a workman or boss.

The object would be to train young men by subjecting them to actual manual (inserted) labor at the tools or machines, to a thorough understanding of the construction and management of them.

For instance a young man may have acquired from drawings and from incidental visits to a machine shop a certain amount of knowledge, which will ennable (sic) him to tell at a glance the difference between a lathe & a plowing machine, or a punching machine.  But let him obtain employment as manager of a shop or suppose (inserted with pencil “him to”) be placed in charge of certain constructions – In in these relations he may at any time be called upon to direct work to be done, or perhaps have to do it himself.  In these cases it will not be sufficient for him to know the machine as a whole: he must understand every part of it: and if it gets out of order, he must be able promptly to go to the cause and remove it.  In a word, a young man after going through such a training and being further educated, in Drawing, in Chemistry, in Physics, and in Engineering would be not only completely fitted to enter at once upon the charge of wood and metal machine shops, but his acquaintance with machinery would make him competent to supervise any kind of manufacture.  This Industrial Department once established admits of almost endless development in the way of illustrating all kinds of manufacturing processes.

 

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July 1882.

Cost of Equipment.

The Cost of the primary equipment described above I am told, would be as follows

Building including a detached one for steam

engines and Boiler House _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $8000.00

Engines and Boilers _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  4000.00

Equipment of Carpenters Shop _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _5000.00

Equipment of Machine Shop & Foundry _ _ _ 15000.00

Total _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $32000.00

The estimate for engines & boilers is intended to cover cost of two engines _ one a high pressure, the other a low pressure or condensing engine.  It would be well to have both types, so as to make students familiar with the workings of each.

Branch Colleges.

As usual I visited all the Branch Colleges at the times of their Commencements I found them in the main, prosperous, At Dahlonega, I witnessed a part of the examinations.  These are all conducted orally. At Thomasville & at Milledgeville I had the opportunity to inspect the examination papers.  These exhibited good method & thorough scholarship on the part of the pupil generally.  These papers show that these two Institutions are able officered.  The examinations at Cuthbert were over before I could reach there from Dahlonega and I had the opportunity of witnessing only what are called the commencement exercises.  The President promises that hereafter some of the classes shall appear on the days now devoted to Commencement, so that I may be able in you name to inspect in that way the methods of the teachers, and their results.

 

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Chancellor’s Report.

At Cuthbert & Thomasville I found that the highest classes are called Freshman, Sophomore, Junior & Senior, and at Milledgeville that the corresponding classes are called 1st, 2nd 3rd and 4th, the first two (inserted in pencil) corresponding to our Sophomore, and the last (inserted in pencil) two (inserted in pencil) to our Freshman.  I think this nomenclature is hurtful and calculated to deceive.  I have therefore formally requested the Presidents severally to change this nomenclature; to have avowedly two College Classes alone; to call them by the names Freshman and Sophomore; and to enforce with them the curricula of study as laid down in our Catalogue.  This the Presidents at Cuthbert and Thomasville have promised to do.  The efficient gentleman at the head of the college at Milledgeville pleads that the classification is made with reference to some alleged accommodation to the convenience of the Military Department.  I did not think best to insist upon the change with him; since I did not wish to embarrass his Military Department.

The Military feature has great prominence at Dahlonega and Milledgeville.  Their students go by the name of cadets; and they have attained to great proficiency in the drill and in Military service.  At Cuthbert the students wear uniforms and attend to the drills; but I witnessed no military exhibitions.  At Thomasville I believe the Military feature has been dropped, perhaps temporarily.

At Dahlonega I conferred the Degree of Bachelor of Arts on 5 young men.

I had the pleasure of meeting gentlemen of your Board at Thomasville, and Milledgeville alone.

 

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July 1882.

I have the honor herewith to transmit to you the Reports of Dr. Mitchell on the Law Department; of Prof. Browne on the Experimental Farm and of Professors Charbonnier and White on matters pertaining to their respective chairs.

Commencement Sermon.

I have engaged Rev. Joseph S. Key D.D. of Macon to preach our Commencement sermon, I respectfully request you to make an appropriation of ten or fifteen dollars to pay his traveling expenses.

Recommendation for Graduation.

The Faculty respectfully recommend for Graduation the following named students:

For Bachelor of Arts.

Lucius C. Adamson,                 Wm. E. W. Dunson,

Joseph B. Alexander,                Davis J. Gaffney,

Piromis H. Bell,                        William Galt,

     Hugh L. Brock,                   Gayron G. Glower,

Milton A. Chandler Jr.             Walter H. Little,

Frank W. Carswill,                   Marcus H. Pharr,

Robert B. Cousins,                   Harry H. Phinizy,

Wm. A Dodson                        John D. Pope,

       Walker Dunson                 H. Warner Van House,

W. George Woodfin, Jr.

 

For Bachelor of Philosophy.

Clarence J. Groover,                James H. Pitman,

Edward W. Wyatt.

 

For Bachelor of Engineering.

Henry P. Burruss                      Arminius H. Frazer,

Thos. P. Stanley

 

For Bachelor of Agriculture.

Arminius H. Frazer.

 

 

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Chancellor’s Supplemental Report.

For Bachelor of Chemical Science.

James A. Wotton,                     Thomas B. Perry.

 

For Bachelor of Law.

John L. Asbury             John Murrow,

Marcus W. Beck,                     Henry C. Tuck,

Burwell R. Calhoun       George Ware

Ebb T. Lamkin             Hugh V. Washington,

David W. Meadow.                  Stephen N. Woodward.

 

                                    I have the honor to remain Gentlemen

                                                            Your Obt. Servt.

                                                                        P. H. Mell

                                                            Chancellor University of Georgia,

 

Chancellor’s Supplemental Report,

                                    University of Ga. July 15th 1882.

To the Board of Trustees,

                                    Gentlemen,

                                                            I have the pleasure to announce to you that Col. R. W. Habersham artist of Augusta, has presented to our Art Gallery, two Portraits, one of Oglethorpe and the other of James Habersham a former Trustees (sic) of the University.  The pictures are in the Library, subject to your inspection.

Honorary Degrees.

I have applications from distinguished gentlemen, requesting that Honorary Degrees be conferred on gentlemen named.  It so happens that Col. Young L. G. Harris and Hon. B. H. Hill, the Trustee members of the Committee on Honorary Degrees are both absent, I respectfully request that a temporary Committee may be appointed with whom I may communicate in the premises.

                                    I have the honor to remain Gentlemen

                                                            Your Obt. Servt.

                                                                        P. H. Mell, Chancellor & c.

 

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July 1882.

Chancellor’s Supplemental Report No. 2.

                                                University of Georgia July 15 1882

To the Board of Trustees,

                                    Gentlemen,

Since sending in my supplemental Report this morning I have received a letter from Rev. S. F. Tenney of Crockett, Texas, enquiring (sic) if he is entitled to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, under a decision made by the Board on the resumption of the exercises of the University immediately after the war.  Your records show that all the members of his class who failed to complete the prescribed course, because they volunteered in the Confederate army, were granted diplomas on application to you.

I have the honor then to transmit to you the following action of the Faculty in the present case:

Resolved, That the Faculty recommend that the Degree of A.B. be conferred on Rev. S. F. Tenney, on the grounds that he took a three years course at the University: that his class standing, during his course was excellent, as shown by the records; that he left the University in 1862 for the purpose of enlisting in the Confederate Army; and that since the war, his course has been such as to improve himself in Litterary (sic) pursuits.

                                                I have the honor Gentlemen to remain

                                                                        Your Obt. Servt.

                                                                                    P. H. Mell,

                                                                                    Chancellor &c.

 

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Report of Prof. L. H. Charbonnier.

                                                            University of Georgia

                                                            Athens, Ga., 6th July 1882.

 

To Dr. P. H. Mell,

            Chancellor University of Georgia,

                                                Dear Sir:

                                                            I beg leave to submit to the Board of Trustees, through you, the following Report concerning the Department of Natural Philosophy.

For condition of Apparatus I refer the Board to the special report made by me to Dr. Mitchell the chairman of the Committee on Apparatus.  I would simply state here that the apparatus is in perfect order, that valuable additions have been made to it during the year; and respectfully call your attention to the small appropriation I ask for next year.

The needs of the astronomical Department are also fully set forth.

During the session I have introduced in my department, a new branch of instruction. I have been anxious to do this since I took charge of my chair in 1877, but want of time hitherto prevented me. As soon as you relieved me, at your last meeting, of active duty in the chair of Engineering, I determined to carry into execution, the plan which I had previously matured.

This plan adds to the University another department of Technology, and enables the student to acquire a practical knowledge of Physical Manipulations.

Under the usual system of teaching Physics the experiments are made entirely by the Professor, explained and commented on by the class.  Where the apparatus is extensive, as ours is, this is, of course, much; and the student can acquire a good, general acquaint-

 

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July 1882.

ance, with Physical principles, and methods of experimentation.  But with students wishing to make a specialty of science, this is not enough; and means ought to be provided to enable them to work with the apparatus themselves.  Again, many Physical experiments cannot be strictly performed in the Lecture room, for want of time, or because of the great delicacy required they cannot be performed in a crowded room.  In the Lecture hour such experiments can only be indicated, the apparatus can be shown, and its working explained, but the actual test has to be omitted. Now these delicate experiments are the very ones which are most interesting and most valuable to a certain class of students.  In addition to these considerations there was another of no less weight,

This branch of instruction had been in the last ten years opened in many of the more wealthy Northern Colleges and with great success.  It behooved the University of Georgia to continue to keep abreast of the best institutions in the land.  It was, therefore, with very great joy that on my relief from other duties I found myself able to establish this new field of scientific culture.

The old course in Physics, remains exactly as it was.  It is a course well adapted to those students who do not wish to make science a specialty: and our fine Apparatus ennables (sic) the Professor to make it attractive, as is evinced by the interest which the students show in the study.

The new course is supplementary to the first.  The name adopted first in American Colleges is “Course in Practical Physics”.

It consists in making the student

 

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Report of Prof. L. H. Charbonnier.

himself go through the experiments illustrating principles or those necessary in making physical tests. 

In order to guard against injury to apparatus the experiments are performed entirely under the Professor’s eye, the students explaining them as they proceed and submitting their results for criticism.

Thus students are taught to handle apparatus, to improvise and construct apparatus of their own, to make their own verifications of the truth of principles, and to perform such tests as belong to physical work.

For instance among other work in this course the students make for themselves all tests necessary in Telegraphy work; tests as to the relative intensity of different lights; tests as to the relative value of different fuels; trials of strength of steam boilers; determinations of Specific Gravity, of Specific Heat, of Latent Heat &c.

The course is eminently a practical one, & is specially intended for those students, who work to make a specialty of physical science and fit themselves for teachers of it.  They do not only learn the manipulations of the instruments, but they are made acquainted with the equipment necessary for a department of Physics and where and how to purchase the apparatus on the best terms.  Twelve students have received during the Session instruction in this special branch, and the interest manifested by them, as well as the progress made have been most gratifying to me.  This work requires of me at least six hours per week in addition to my other duties; but the gratification I feel in thus expanding the field of usefulness of the University, amply repays me for the extra labor & care                   Respectfully Submitted

                           L. H. Charbonnier Prof. Ph. & Astrn.

 

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July 1882.

                                                                        University of Georgia

Department of Agriculture &c.

                                                Athens, Ga. July 13th 1882.

Rev. P. H. Mell D.D. L.L. D.

                                    Chancellor &c.

                                                        Sir,

                                                         I have the honor to report for the information of the Hon. Board of Trustees, that the experimental farm attached to the Chair of Agriculture, is in improved condition; and that not only has it served a valuable purpose in illustrating practically to the students the science of Agriculture taught in the Class Room, but it has also been of considerable benefit to the farmers of this and other states, in the lessons which they deduce from the experiments which have been conducted on the farm during the past and preceding years, a detailed report of which is made by me at the Semi-annual conventions of the Ga. State Agricultural Society.

This field of usefulness might be very largely extended, were the farm adequately equipped with the machinery and implements essential to the full development of scientific truth, and the demonstration of the usefulness and economy of those appliances which inventive genius and skill have provided for the saving of labor, the better execution of all the branches of farm work and the better preparation of produce for market.  While the farm is dependent on a toll gin and a travelling thresher for the preparation of its cotton and grain for consumption it is impossible to carry out fully the experiments which are instituted in regard to them. I cite one instance in order to illustrate my

 

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Report of Prof. W. M. Browne.

meaning.  It is believed that fertilizers improve the quality as well as increase the quantity of production.  It is not possible for me now to investigate this matter or test the comparative merits of the different fertilizers in this regard, because I have not the requisite machinery.  The amount paid annually to the public gin and travelling thresher, would in a few years pay the cost of the needed machinery.  It may not be improper to add that in every one of the Agricultural Colleges in the United States the legislatures of the States in which they are severally situated have made ample provision for their complete equipment and notably in the States of Tennessee and Louisiana.

While I am aware that the means at the disposal of the Board of Trustees are not available for the above purpose.  It may be hoped that the General Assembly would make the requisite appropriation were the value and importance of the object brought to their attention under the influential sanction of the Board of Trustees.

I am happy to state that the receipts of the farm for the past year have exceeded its expenses and have enabled me to pay the cost of a considerable amount of wire fencing to replace that which had fallen down in decay; of 750 rods of hill side ditches to prevent the washing which in former years did so much injury, to the land; and of all the fertilizers used on the farm with exception of two sacks furnished by the State Department of Agriculture.  As evidence of the improved condition of the farm, I may be permitted to cite the following facts asking the Board to remember in connection with them the worn con-

 

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July 1882.

dition of the land in cultivation.

            Ten (10) acres in cotton notwithstanding the unfavorable seasons, produced 4660 lbs. of lint cotton - an average of a bale weighing 466 lbs. per acre.  Seven and one half (7 ½ ) acres in oats produced 360 bushels of grain or an average of 48 bushels per acre.

Seven (7) acres in corn, unpropitious as was the season produced an average of 17 bushels per acre.  A number of experiments have been conducted and are still in progress. some of which are of great importance.

The most interesting of these is as to the nitrogen supply of our cotton and corn crops.  First as to whether cotton & corn derive their nitrogen from the soil or from the atmosphere; Second, if the former, in what form, as nitrates (of soda or potash) as nitrogen of vegetable origin (cotton seed meal) Third to what extent if at all, nitrogenous manures should be applied to cotton & corn; and Fourth does the use of nitrogenous manures for corn and cotton increase production so as to be profitable in a money point of view. 

This experiment carefully conducted will, it is hoped aid in the solution of a question the importance of which to the agricultural world cannot be overestimated, when it is remembered that nitrogen is the most expensive ingredient in the commercial fertilizers generally used.  I have in progress a number of other experiments as to seeds, cultivation distance, manures, forage crops &c. &c. thus adding annually to the volume of scientific truth, whose development has wrought such great and

 

(334)

Report of Mr. Stephens on Donation.

beneficent changes in Agriculture during the past ten years.

I desire to acknowledge gratefully the valuable aid given me on all occasions by my colleague, Prof. H. C. White.  I am also under obligation to Prof. W. O. Atwater of the Agricultural College of Connecticut, for valuable information and advice.

Our friend Mr. P. J. Berckmans of Augusta has made this year another gift of shrubs and plants to the ornamental grounds and flower garden of the farm.  His liberality in this respect to our University, merits a grateful acknowledgement.

 

                                                The Select Committee to whom was referred the communication of Hon. Joseph E. Brown to the Board of Trustees made this day proposing a donation to the University of fifty thousand dollars on certain terms and conditions therein expressed have duly considered the same and beg leave to report the following:

Resolved, First: that the proposition of Hon. Joseph E. Brown to the Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia made this day be accepted upon the terms and conditions therein expressed.

Resolved, Second That this Board for themselves and in behalf of the people of Georgia tender thanks to him for this munificent donation.

Resolved, Third That a committee of five be appointed by the president of this Board to make known to the donor the action of the Board upon the proposition, to present the matter to the next legislature and ask that an act be passed carrying it into effect, and to see that the papers are recorded according to his request.

                                                                        Alexander H. Stephens

                                                                        G. T. Pierce

  1. R. Lawton

D. H. Vason

J. H. Billups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Athens, Ga. July 15th 1882

To the Board of Trustees of

                        the University of Georgia;

                                                            Gentlemen;

                                                                        I have had the honor to hold the position of trustee and member of your board for over a quarter of a century.  During all this time I have felt great interest in the success & prosperity of the University.

It has long been my wish to do something, which may afford substantial aid to it and result in permanent future good; to the people of this State who have so long sustained and honored me.  I am now in better condition to carry out this cherished object than I have been at any time since my connection with the Board.

Nearly one year ago, my son Charles McDonald Brown, a noble Christian youth, of fine intellectual & business capacity, the soul of honor and integrity, who had been a student in the University, was taken from us by death.  He was named for my true & cherished friend, the late Gov. Charles J. McDonald.  He was possessed of some estate, the bulk of which he left to me and his mother, giving small sums to each of his brothers & sisters, in token of his love and affectionate regard for them.  He had bright

 

(336)

Joseph E. Brown’s Donation.

prospects, and if he had lived, might reasonably have expected at no distant day, at my death to go into the possession of considerable addition to his estate.

Now while it is my object to do something that will advance the interests of the University and aid to some useful extent in the education of worthy young men of the state, who are not able to educate themselves; I desire at the same time to perpetuate the the (sic) name of my said deceased son in connection with the University and also that of my old friend Gov. McDonald whose name he bore. As a means of doing this I propose with the consent of your honorable body, and upon the terms & conditions herein after mentioned to make a donation to the University of Fifty Thousand dollars, money that might have been possessed by my son if he had lived; to be known and in all appropriate publications made by the University designated as, “The Charles McDonald Brown Scholarship Fund.”

This donation to be made on condition that the State of Georgia will receive the said sum (which I will pay in cash) into her treasury to be used in payment of the public debt, or in such other manner as may be for the best interests of the State and will issue her bond or bonds to the University bearing Seven per cent interest, the interest to be paid semi-annually to the University, the bond or obligation to run for fifty years.  At the last Session the General Assembly passed an Act; to make permanent the endowment of the University; which provides in substance that whenever the trustees of the University of Georgia shall

 

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July 1882.

through their duly authorized agent or officer present at the state treasury for redemption any valid, matured bond of the state as the property of the University, that the Governor shall issue to the trustees in lieu of said matured bond, an obligation in writing in the nature of a bond, in an amount equal to said matured bond, falling due fifty years after date of such issue, the same to bear interest at the rate of seven per cent per annum, and not to be subject to be called in for redemption by the State before that time, not to be negotiable by the trustees, but payable to them alone, to be issued under the great seal of the state, signed by the Governor, countersigned by the Secretary of the State &c.

                                                            All I ask is that the State treat the amount which I propose to donate to the University just as she would treat any other amount of money which may be the property of the University due at the maturity of any bond or bonds of the State belonging to the University.

I have long thought it the duty of the State to endow the University liberally, and believe that wise statesmanship & sound policy dictated such a course.  While the representatives of the people have not yet done what it seems to me would be wise in this particular, they have shown a disposition to make permanent the endowment which the University possesses, & I think it would be only a reasonable extension of this law to make it apply to all funds that may be donated to the University as well as funds belonging to the University on maturing bonds.

 

(338)

Joseph E. Brown’s Donation.

I cannot doubt that the legislature will see the wisdom & propriety of doing this & I therefore make the donation conditional upon the passage of an act to carry out this object in accordance with the rule above, mentioned at the next session of the General Assembly; and upon the further condition that the fund shall be used for the purposes, & in the manner hereinafter mentioned.

There are hundreds and I believe thousands of young men of good character in Georgia who are intellectual & ambitious to become useful, who desire to obtain a liberal education; some with a view to the profession of law, other the practice of medicine; some for the Gospel ministry, some engineers, architects, chemists, teachers, professors in Colleges and other useful and honorable pursuits: some of whom have at their command part of the means necessary to board & clothe them, while engaged in the pursuit of their Studies in connection with the University.  Other young men may be very bright & very worthy who have none of the means necessary to pay for board and clothing while engaged in their studies.  I believe there are many young men of both classes mentioned who would consider it their good fortune, to be able to borrow at a reasonable rate of interest, a sufficient amount to carry them through College or to enable them to graduate, in the particular profession or pursuit which they intend to follow, & who would be willing after they had obtained an education & prepared themselves for business to refund the money as soon as they could make it after providing for their livelyhood (sic) in an economical manner until they are able to pay it.

Such a young men who takes a proper view of the subject, would not desire to incur more indebtedness than necessity required.  He would be willing for the sake of obtaining an education to wear plain clothing & be content with cheap board, if reasonably good and wholesome.

I know from experience in early life the feelings of a youth desirous of educating himself without the means to do so; and the good fortune which a loan of money for support while engaged in study was considered as conferring upon the recipient.

I recollect very well, too, that prudence dictated an economical course so as to incur no more indebtedness that was actually necessary.  I preferred to live plainly and cheaply, and study hard; rather than be too much loaded with debt; but I considered myself very fortunate when I was able to borrow the amount actually necessary for the prosecution of my studies even to a limited extent.  And I doubt not there are at this time large numbers of young men in similar situations who are prompted by the same feelings.  The object of this donation is to establish a fund in the hands of the University, the interest of which is to be loaned to young men of the character I mention.

First; To aid in part, such young men as may have some means, but not sufficient to carry them through the course selected by them.

Secondly: To aid others who have no means, but

 

(340)

Joseph E. Brown’s Donation.

who are bright and worthy & ambitious to succeed.  I desire that the University do this by loaning the interest which may accrue from the principal each year, to young men of the classes above mentioned; No young man to avail himself of the benefit of the fund until he is eighteen years of age; each to sign a pledge of honor when he enteres (sic) the college and commences to receive the fund that he will refund the amount he receives, to the University as soon after he completes his course of study as he may be able to make it, living economically in the meantime; and as this obligation given during the minority of the student would not be legally binding, let him also pledge himself that when twenty one years of age he will give to the University his obligation legally binding for the payment of said sum as aforesaid with four percent per annum interest upon the same.

As each will incur indebtedness by borrowing the means necessary to educate himself, each will become more reliant, which will be better for him in the end, if he is manly & possesses talent, than if the amount had been given him.

And as tuition is now free in the University, I direct that not more than two hundred dollars per annum shall be loaned to any student, to be advanced to him monthly during the scholastic year.  But interest to commence to run on the amount advanced each year at the end of the year.  Having no tuition to pay a young man with close economy may be able to get along upon that

 

(341)

July 1882.

sum; and many who have part of the means necessary will not desire so much.

I earnestly urge upon each recipient of the fund, the importance of paying back the money as promptly as possible; and I trust each will consider it a sacred obligation, as the repayment increases the amount to be loaned to others, who will be anxious to receive the same benefits enjoyed by himself.

If there should be a larger number of promising young men apply for the benefits of the loan than can be accommodated, then I direct that the trustees of the University provide for a selection of recipients from time to time, in such manner, as in their judgment may be most fair and equitable.  My wish is that they be selected as impartially as may be formall (sic) parts of the state, so that each section of the state may be represented.  If there are many applicants and it can conveniently be done, I think a compedative (sic) examination might be best, but there will no doubt, be many cases, where this cannot be had without difficulty; and where the young man is very bright & worthy; in which case the appointment can very safely be made without a compedative (sic) examination.

I wish such young men selected as are bright, of good moral character, apt to learn, in reasonable heath(sic), and ambitious to prepare themselves for usefulness.  I do not wish to make a donation to students, but to place a fund in the hands of the University which it will loan them in aid of their education to be paid back by them as aforesaid.

 

(342)

Joseph E. Brown’s Donation.

I desire the amount paid in by each student in return for the money he has received to be added annually as it is paid in to the principal sum above mentioned, and only the interest upon it to be loaned in future which will from time to time enable the University to increase the number of young men to whom it can make loans, This will ultimately increase the amount of principal which in course of time if properly managed, will grow to a large sum.

I trust the legislature of our noble & beloved old state, will make provision for receiving this accumulation, into the treasury from time to time; and issue its bonds to the University, in lieu of it, as the fund may accumulate.  But if contrary to my desire & expectation, the state after having given its obligation for the principal, sum of the donation above mentioned, shall at any time refuse to issue its bonds for the accumulated fund in aid of the University; or shall at the end of fifty years refuse to issue its bonds or obligation for the principal sum of fifty thousand dollars & shall pay the same over to the University, then the Board of Trustees may in each or either of said cases invest such fund as my accumulate in the bonds of the United States, or of other state.

The general provision above mentioned are subject to the following qualifications:

I desire that the sum of One thousand dollars interest accruing annually from the said principal sum of fifty thousand dollars as above mentioned be used by the Board of Trustees aforesaid to aid young men to pursue their studies in the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega upon the same terms as are prescribed for students at the University at Athens;

 

(343)

July 1882.

except that the students who may participate in the benefits of this fund at Dahlonega, must be selected under such rules & regulations as the Board of Trustees of the University may prescribe (to be reasonable and just;) from the mountain counties of North East Georgia; and the Counties of Oconee, Pickens; and Anderson in the State of South Carolina.  Pickens District now Oconee and Pickens counties; contains my birth place.  My life up to the Commencement of my manhood was spent in the district of my birth place in South Carolina and in the mountains of North East Georgia; and the first credit I received for money in aid of my education was in the County of Anderson, S. C. in which Calhoun Academy, where I commenced my studies is located.

The mountain Section above mentioned was the theatre of my early struggle with poverty in my attempt to educate myself; and I wish to pay its people who have sympathized with and supported me in every emergency, this small tribute of my grateful recollection.  As the amounts loaned students at Dahlonega are returned, I wish them to be added to the principal which is set apart out of the sum of Fifty thousand Dollars as donated above, to raise the said sum of One thousand dollars annually for said College at Dahlonega; so that it may accumulate as in case of the fund set apart for students of the University at Athens, both being placed upon the same principle of accumulation. 

If the North Georgia Agricultural College should at any time be discon-

 

 

 

 

 

(344)

Joseph E. Brown’s Donation.

tinued (which I trust may never occur) and any other school or College of like grade should take its place at Dahlonega or in any of the mountain counties of North East Georgia; that is not denominational in its character, the benefits intended for the North Georgia Agricultural College at Dahlonega are to be transferred to the students of such College, or high school as may be selected by the Board of Trustees of the State University, to take its place on said section of country.

If unfortunately, there should at any time in the future be no such school kept in the said section of North East Georgia, for as much as five years, then the fund set apart for that purpose shall be transferred to the University at Athens, and become part of the fund to be expended in aid of the students there in the manner, & on the terms already mentioned.

If there should be any year when there are not enough of applicants for the fund, of good moral character and promise, to consume the amount of interest accruing during that year, the accrued interest not so used, is to be added to the principal sum and placed at interest to the principal sum and placed at interest, the annual interest to be applied to the purpose already designated.  In case of the fund to be loaned to young men at Dahlonega; as living is cheaper there than at Athens, I direct that not more than one hundred and fifty dollars annually be loaned to any young man, while engaged in the pursuit of his studies, to be paid to him monthly, the interests for each year to commence at the end of the year.  The amount in each case may

 

(345)

July 1882.

seem small, but a young man without means who is not willing to live economically to secure an education, or who is willing to go in debt to obtain larger sums to be expended in better living, or for greater display at College; is not in my opinion, the person most likely to succeed, or most worthy to be trusted with funds which he is expected to return.

Any young man who pursues his studies for the purpose of preparing himself for the ministry in any of the churches, and who after the completion of his studies, devotes his time and talent under the authority of his church to the work of the ministry as his profession or business shall only be required to return to the University one half the amount received by him with interest as aforesaid.

Any young man studying to prepare himself for the profession of medicine, may persue (sic) his studies in Augusta where the Medical Department of the University is located.

No part of the fund herein mentioned shall at any time be paid as fees, commission, salary, or otherwise to the trustees or any officer or agent of the trustees; or any officer or agent of the University.

As the fund is donated to aid poor but worthy young men, to secure a liberal education; I have full confidence that the trustees and officers of the University, with whom I have acted so long, & their successors; will as heretofore in all cases connected with their trust, administer, this as part of the funds of the University for the good of all, for the usual salaries

 

 

 

 

 

(346)

Joseph E. Brown’s Donation.

which the officers would receive if no such fund existed.

If it should at any time become necessary to employ counsel to collect money due from any one who borrowed it as a student, & is able to pay it back and refuses to do so; there is will be expected that the usual fees be paid to such counsel, and some Attorney might in such case, be employed to look generally after such collections and see that the University does not suffer loss by in attention to such Collections.

I reserve to my four sons Julius L. Brown, Joseph M. Brown, Elijah A. Brown, and George M. Brown, each the right to select one young man to receive the benefits of the loan, and as the one selected, graduates, or leaves College to select another as successor, so that College to select another as successor, so that each may constantly during his natural life, keep one student of his own selection in the University, as a recipient of the use of the funds necessary in his case, subject to the regulations above specified, and in case any one, or each of my sons shall select a kins man as near to him as the fourth degree of consanguinity, such student shall have the benefit of the fund free from the obligation to refund it to the University, if my said son selecting such relative shall so direct; all other selections to be made under the rules and regulations to be prescribed by the Board of Trustees as already mentioned.  And my said sons and the survivors or survivor of them shall have all the usual rights of visitation, with power to see that the trust assumed by the Board of Trustees in behalf of the University is justly and faithfully administered, and in case the

 

(347)

July 1882.

trust is unjustly, illegally, or wrongfully abused to proceed in the proper court to recover back the funds for the use of my legal heirs; but neither my heirs, nor any one of them, shall have the right to recover back the said fund on account of any technical or inadvertent failure, to carry out the trust, if there has not been an important, or substantial failure to do so.

The survivor of my said four sons may by his will appoint some one with like power of visitation if he thinks proper to do so.

                                                                        Joseph E. Brown.

 

The Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia having by resolution accepted my proposition to donate to the University Fifty thousand dollars to be known as “The Charles McDonald Brown Scholarship fund,” subject to the conditions mentioned in my communication of this date, I hereby bind myself, my heirs, executors, & administrators to pay into the treasury of the State of Georgia for the benefit of the University, subject to the terms mentioned in my said communication the sum of Fifty thousand Dollars in cash as soon as the legislature of the state at is next session shall have passed an act binding the state to receive the fund, and give her obligation to the University for the said fund payable fifty years after its date with semi-annual interest at the rate of Seven per cent per annum.  And I desire the communication, resolution of acceptance, and this obligation, recorded on the regular minutes of the Board of Trustees,

 

 

 

 

(348)

Report of Committee on Laws & Discipline.

and in the office of the clerk of the Superior Courts of Clarke County, Georgia, for preservation.

 

Executed in presence of    Joseph E. Brown

Wm. L. Mitchell

            Secretary

H. V. M. Miller, Pres. Pro. Tem.

James Jackson

            Chief Justice of Supreme Court

            of Georgia.

 

                                    The Committee on Laws and Discipline recommend the adoption of the following resolutions in relation to the Chancellor’s Report.

First.  Resolved, That there be no relaxation of the standard of scholarship necessary to enable students to rise from Class to Class and finally to graduate in any degree conferred by the University and that the Faculty enforce the present grade.

Secondly. Resolved, That the programme for future Commencement exercises recommended by the Chancellor in his Report, including the Class day on Saturday before Commencement Sunday, and the exercises on that day, be adopted.

Thirdly.  Resolved, That the Report on the subject of a water supply for the Campus be referred to the Prudential Committee and Faculty with power to act thereon, having reference to our finances and under the advice & concurrence of the Finance Committee of this Board.

Fourthly.  Resolved, That the Centennial aniversary (sic) of the University should be celebrated not on the date of one hundred years from the act which authorized its establishment, but from the date it was actually put in operation.

Fifthly.  Resolved, That the Report in respect to the practical department of technology is approved and that the same be carried into operation

 

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July 1882.

just so soon as the State shall appropriate the money necessary, and that the Chancellor be instructed to lay the plan before the next Governor and legislature and urge the necessary appropriation.

Sixthly.  Resolved, That the secretary be authorized to spread on the minutes such reports of Professors referred to by the Chancellor in his Report as may be useful to illustrate that Report or perpetuate the history of the College.

 

The Committee on Laws & Discipline to whom was referred certain Resolutions beg leave to Report.

Firstly.  The recommend the adoption of the resolutions in regard to the gift of Charles F. McCay,  And further that at the next annual meeting of the Board when the Bonds are counted that a certified copy of the same be obtained and deposited in the vault of a Bank in Augusta.

Secondly.  Upon the resolution requiring a matriculation and Library fees of fifteen dollars at the respective branch colleges the committee report adversely to its passage.

The Committee are not prepared at this time to recommend change in the time of Commencement.

The Committee are not prepared to suggest any change of Discipline likely to secure the continued attendance of students during the entire College course.

The Blue List as at present made has the sanction of the Board of Trustees and there is no evidence of abuse of power or injustice in the forming of it, but the committee recommend that the subject be commended

 

(350)

Chas. F. McCay’s Donation.

to the attention of the Faculty for such improvement as experience may suggest.

The resolution in relation to the delivery of orations by the Faculty and students, is respectfully referred to the Chancellor and Faculty with the expression of the hope that the most efficient means be adopted for improvement in oratory.

 

On Motion of J. J. Gresham,

Resolved that the Treasurer of this Board be directed to have the deed from Charles F. McCay directed to this Institution of seven thousand Dollars under certain trusts and limitations, recorded in the Office of the Clerk of Superior Court of Clarke County.

Resolved that the Treasurer be instructed in his annual report of the funds belonging to this Institution to include the Bonds belonging to this fund now amounting to twenty thousand dollars in bonds of the Georgia Rail Road Company with the Coupons cut off up to the first of January 1895; and further that at the next examination of the Bonds, certified copies be obtained and deposited by the Finance Committee in the vault of an Augusta Bank.

 

The Committee on Honorary Degrees beg leave to Report,

                        That they recommend that the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Philosophy be conferred on Walter LeConte Stevens a native of Georgia now resident in New York City.

They also recommend that the Honorary Degree of Master of Arts be conferred on Hon. Wm. M. Hammond of the County of Thomas a graduate of the University

 

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July 1882.

of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

                                                                        Respectfully Submitted

  1. R. Lawton

Acting Chairman

 

To the honorable Board of Trustees of the University of Georgia.          

                                                                                    Your Committee on Department of Agriculture & Horticulture, would refer to the Report of the Professor of this Department for a more detailed account of the operation of the experimental station attached to his Chair.

It is gratifying to us to state that the condition of the farm, so far as we have been able to inspect it, is very good, reflecting credit on the skill and management of the Professor.  The crops are promising, thoroughly and judiciously cultivated & well arranged. 

The experiments in progress are of great interest and value and are ably & faithfully conducted.

To produce the best and fullest results the equipment of the farm, in implements and machinery, is altogether insufficient and we would recommend that this defect be supplied so soon as the financial condition of the University will permit.

We recommend the appropriation now of one hundred dollars as necessary to renew the old and decayed fences.

We would recommend a further appropriation of one hundred dollars to be expended in the publication & circulation of a full report, by the Professor of Agriculture, of the operations of the experimental farm in order that the Agricultural public

 

(352)

Report on Apparatus.

may be informed as to the practical work done upon the farm and of the scope & character of the instruction offered to the students.

                                                            This mode of advertising their agricultural Departments, is employed by other Institutions; and we think it would be well for us to adopt it.

                                                                                    Respectfully Submitted

                                                                                                Benj. C. Yancey, Chrn.

 

University of Georgia

                                    July 8th 1882

The Committee on Apparatus beg leave to Report;

            That a careful inspection of all the apparatus in Moore College has been made, consisting of the instruments and specimens in the Departments of Chemistry Natural Philosophy and Engineering.

Every thing in the Building is in good order & the several Professors are entitled to high praise for the manner in which the Apparatus is kept.

The Apparatus in the Natural Philosophy Department under the charge of Col. L. H. Charbonnier, the Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy are kept in a manner deserving all praise.  Such is the admirable system of the Professor that no instrument is ever put back in the apparatus Room unless it be in perfect order, but is carried to the workshop for repair when any necessary repairs are made by the Professor’s own hands.  In view of the large apparatus under the Professor’s chair such a system can alone preserve every Instrument in working order.

During the past session there have been made

 

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July 1882.

several important additions to the Philosophical Apparatus.

An Induction Coil made by Ritchie of Boston capable of giving an eight inch spark.

A Dynamic Electric machine made by same.

A magnetic Elective machine made at our University.

A Bradleys Apparatus for Electrical measurements.  This is a very fine Instrument and with it students are now taught how to make all tests necessary in Telegraphic and other Electrical work.

A set of Crookes Tubes to reproduce Crooke’s experiments on ratiant matter.

A fine spectroscope from Browning of England, and upon the same, a Wheatstone.

Bridge to use with Bradleys apparatus for Electrical measurements.

The old Holly Electrical machine has been remoddled (sic), and what are know as Teifler’s attachments have bee