CRITERIA FOR APPOINTMENT AND PROMOTION

Job Performance

The librarian/archivist has a major role in the academic community.  He/she assumes primary responsibility for developing the library's/archive's collections, for extending bibliographic control over these collections, for aiding faculty and other scholars in the best means to utilize these collections, as well as instructing students and other library users on both a formal and an informal basis on the interpretation and use of them.  The librarian/archivist serves as a resource person for the academic community providing extensive services which range from answering specific questions to compiling extensive bibliographies. Without the skills of highly skilled librarians/archivists, research and the quality of teaching in the university would be seriously impaired.

Librarians/archivists assume professional tasks which require a special background and education in one of the technical, public, or administrative areas of the Libraries; make independent judgments; and plan, organize, communicate, and administer programs of service to users of the Libraries' materials and services.  Candidates must be judged on criteria appropriate to their assigned duties.  In any of the ranks, responsibilities may include supervision or management; however, administrative duties are not a prerequisite for any appointment or promotion.

The performance of the librarian/archivist in his/her assigned duties becomes a critical factor in the Libraries' continuing successful service to the university community.  Successful job performance, which is defined as performance evaluated at the "meets expectations" level or above on annual performance appraisals, is the single most important criterion for promotion in rank.  The librarian/archivist should have demonstrated the ability to carry out competently and independently the complete range of functions and duties relating to his/her rank and particular assignment.  It should be recognized that each position necessitates particular requirements and skills, and these must be carefully considered. Job related characteristics such as accuracy, judgment, ability to organize work, dependability, initiative, positive relationships with staff and/or patrons, written and oral skills, and understanding of the relationship of one's function to the more general goals of the Libraries and the University also have a bearing on one's job performance and should be considered in the overall performance.

Documentation

All candidates are required to submit their current performance evaluation; earlier evaluations may be submitted if desired. Other evidence of effective job performance may come from sources including, but not limited to the following:

  1. Letters or other documentation from colleagues, subordinates, or supervisors
  2. Letters or other documentation from students, faculty, or other library users
  3. Letters or other documentation from sources outside the university

Service to the University/Libraries

The quality and extent of contributions to the Libraries and University as a whole will merit consideration for appointment and promotion.  Contributions may include service on University-wide governing bodies and/or Libraries governing bodies; participation in University-wide or Libraries committees; work on university, faculty, or library projects; or involvement in any other way that would further the objectives of the University or the Libraries.  Examples of university, faculty, or library projects include preparation of exhibits, participation in the planning of staff development workshops or other education programs, editing in-house newsletters, reports, or other publications.

Documentation

Evidence of service to the University/Libraries may come from sources including, but not limited to those listed below:

  1. Brief descriptions of committees, governing bodies, projects, workshops, or programs with copies of any reports or results appended
  2. Letters or other documentation from faculty, students, or other library users
  3. Letters or other documentation from colleagues, subordinates, or supervisors
  4. Letters or other documentation from sources outside the university 

Professional Activities

Participation in professional activities on the local, state, regional, and national levels will be considered in determining appointment and promotion. Examples of such participation include active involvement in professional and learned societies as a member, committee member or officer, as well as attendance at professional, scholarly, or technical meetings, workshops, and conferences; consulting services to other libraries, archives, or academic institutions; service as a professional advisor to special programs or projects sponsored by scholarly organizations, consortia, or interdisciplinary academic groups; and outstanding achievements or promise as evidenced by awards, fellowships, grants, teaching and lecturing, and editorial activity.

Professional Activities also includes continuing education.  Examples are: obtaining an additional advanced degree; completion of advanced courses in librarianship, archival studies, one's academic specialization, or courses relevant to the candidate's position; participation in continuing education programs including professional short courses, seminars, workshops, lectures, or conferences; or acquisition of additional skills relevant to the candidate's position such as a foreign language, or computer programming; or participation in an internship program or other similar program outside the library that is relevant to the candidate's position.

Documentation

Evidence of participation in professional activities may come from sources including, but not limited to those listed below:

  1. Reports or other documentation generated from the activity
  2. Candidate's statement of membership in organizations or continuing education activity
  3. Evidence of courses or degrees completed
  4. Letters or other documentation from faculty, students, or other library users
  5. Letters or other documentation from colleagues, subordinates, or supervisors
  6. Letters or other documentation from sources outside the university

Contributions to Research and other Creative Activities

Contributions include research, publications, or teaching in librarianship, archival studies, one's academic specialty, or a related field. A list of specific endeavors which may fulfill the requirements in this area includes, but is not limited to:

  • Author of publications (e.g., articles, chapters, reports, books, media productions, annotated bibliographies, or critical reviews appearing in professional books or journals)
  • Citations to the candidate's research
  • Presenter of papers, lectures, demonstrations, or poster sessions given at professional meetings
  • Participation in other creative activities related to the librarian/archivist's specialization
  • Creator of substantial processes, computer programs, software, or apparatus useful in library or archival operations
  • Member or intern on an editorial board reviewing publications for a professional journal, panels judging grant/contract proposals, or juries judging art work or performing artists (i.e., consultant or judge in area of professional expertise)
  • Author of substantial in-house print or electronic publications, such as annotated bibliographies, indexes, finding aids, databases, retention schedules or catalogs for public distribution
  • Recipient of fellowships, grants, awards or other special honors for research or instruction
  • Author of grant proposals for a project related to profession
  • Instructor for a course in one's area of specialization

Noteworthy contributions should be highlighted and elaborated on for the consideration of the Committee. The candidate should explain the nature and significance of each emphasized contribution.

Documentation

Evidence of contributions to research and other creative activities may come from sources including, but not limited to those listed below:

  1. Copies of publications or citations to publications
  2. Candidate's statement of participation in such activities
  3. Letters or other documentation from faculty, students, or other library users
  4. Letters or other documentation from colleagues, subordinates, or supervisors
  5. Letters or other documentation from sources outside the university

Service to the Community

Service to the community may be used as additional support. Service to the community involves participation in activities outside the University that help to carry forth the University's service to the community, or that in any way enhance the image of the University to the community at large.  Specific activities include: serving as a consultant, teaching, or otherwise extending one's knowledge to the public; participation in civic or community activities, such as committee work, holding an office, or volunteer work.

Documentation

Evidence of service to the community may come from sources including, but not limited to those listed below:

  1. Reports or other documentation generated from the activity
  2. Candidate's statement of participation
  3. Letters or other documentation from sources outside the university