CML Closed Sunday

June 30, 2015 – 10:25 AM - cbuss

The Curriculum Materials Library will be closed July 3 – July 5, with regular hours resuming July 6th. The CML is regularly open M-Th 8:00-8:00, Fridays 8:00-5:00 and Sundays 1:00-5:00 when classes are in session.


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The Curriculum Materials Library is open again

June 18, 2015 – 8:53 AM - cbuss

The CML in 207 Aderhold is back in business. We have new carpeting, new lights, fresh paint and a completely new, and much better, arrangement. We still have public computers, study space, a copier/scanner & printer, professional research help and, of course, thousands of children’s & young adult books and assorted media. The CML is open to everyone Mon-Thur 8:00-8:00; Fridays 8:00-5:00 and Sundays 1:00-5:00. Come visit!


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Screening, Music Voyager in Athens!

June 15, 2015 – 4:33 PM - Richard B. Russell Library

Music Voyager is a travel series that uses music as the key to unlock the arts, food, and music scenes of cities around the world. Last November, the Music Voyager team visited Georgia, filming in Macon, Athens, and Atlanta. This Friday, June 19th, Georgia Public Broadcasting will broadcast the Athens/Macon episode at 7:30 p.m.

Please join us at the Rialto Room of Hotel Indigo beginning at 7:00 p.m. for a free screening of this heaping helping of local culture. Athenians and Athens scenes featured in this episode include Kishi Bashi, the Whigs, the 40 Watt Club, Art Rosenbaum, Michael Lachowski, the Art Rocks Athens exhibit at the UGA Special Collections Library, and chef Peter Dale of the National.

For more information, Mary Miller, mlmiller@uga.edu or 706-542-4789


Help us to organize our new web site!

June 11, 2015 – 10:36 AM - Deborah Stanley, Web Editor

We are working on a new UGA Libraries web site.

Help us to organize our content, by taking the card sort survey. It’s a fun drag-and-drop puzzle and only takes a few minutes.

Thank you for helping us to make a better web site!

Questions? Comments? Email Deborah Stanley: dstanley@uga.edu

UPDATE: The survey is now closed. Thanks to everyone who participated!


First Person Project Day Scheduled for June 19th

June 5, 2015 – 9:52 AM - Richard B. Russell Library

1st person projectfsg_june19Join the Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies for the First Person Project, an oral history series documenting the experiences of everyday Georgians, on Friday, June 19, 2015 in the Richard B. Russell Building for Special Collections Libraries.

Six sets of partners will be accepted for this First Person Project session, scheduled for Friday, June 19th between 9:00am and 4:00pm. Each audio recording session takes one hour to complete. Photographs of interview pairs will also be taken for each session. The Russell Library will archive the interviews to add to its documentation of life in post 20th century Georgia and will provide participants with a free digital download of the recording and photographs. A $10 donation is suggested for each participant pair.

If you have a friend or family member with a story to tell, become a part of the First Person Project. Reservations are on a first come, first serve basis and can be made by calling 706-542-5782 or emailing clopez@uga.edu.

More About the First Person Project
Modeled roughly on StoryCorps, a national initiative partnered with National Public Radio and the Library of Congress, the First Person Project is smaller in scale but similar in concept, providing tools to would-be oral history interviewers and interviewees, including tips on how to create questions and conduct interviews. The project was inspired by the belief that everyone is an eyewitness to history, and that everyone, sometimes with a little encouragement, has a story to tell.

To learn more about the Richard B. Russell Library, visit:
http://www.libs.uga.edu/russell


Faculty: help us with our library web site redesign!

June 1, 2015 – 4:20 PM - Deborah Stanley, Web Editor

The library is redesigning its web site, and we want to hear from our faculty on what you want from the new site!

We are holding two focus groups, one on Tuesday, June 16th at 10:30, and the other on Wednesday, June 17th at 2:30, where we will ask a group of about half a dozen faculty members to join us for a conversation on what you do and don’t like about the current site, and how the new site can support your research and teaching.

Each focus group should take no more than an hour, and we will ply you with food and beverages to show our appreciation!

If you would like to take part, please email the UGA Libraries’ Web Editor, Deborah Stanley, at dstanley@uga.edu.

Thank you!


Have a paper accepted in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal? Maximize your audience, publish it Open Access, see details!

June 1, 2015 – 4:17 PM - mariann
The Royal Society of Chemistry’s Gold for Gold Publishing Program
As top tier subscribers to Royal Society of Chemistry journals, UGA Libraries are pleased to support Open Access publishing for our faculty and students who have an accepted manuscript in an RSC journal, for free. This new program is called Gold for Gold.
The author of an accepted paper can elect to publish it Open Access,  thus reaching a wider audience. With free and immediate access, Open Access articles receive higher visibility and citation rates than publications behind pay walls. The RSC Gold for Gold program waives author page charges typically associated with publishing Open Access that most academic publishers offer.
There is a limited number of vouchers, so please ask for details right away if you have an accepted RSC manuscript and wish to maximize readership of your article!
Please contact UGA Gold for Gold Representative:
Mariann Burright, mariann@uga.edu
Gold For Gold FAQ for details: http://www.rsc.org/Publishing/librarians/GoldforGold.asp
To learn more about Open Access, visit: http://guides.libs.uga.edu/scholarlycommunications

 


User log in change for DMP Tool to occur on Friday, May 22, 2015

May 19, 2015 – 3:25 PM - mariann

DMP Tool is a website hosted by the University of California that helps users prepare Data Management Plans for granting agency requirements.

If you have a user account in DMP Tool, the log in process will migrate to a single sign on. You will see a change per the instructions below.

If you created your account using a UGA email address, the switch to new log in process should be seamless.

For questions, please contact Mariann Burright: mariann@uga.edu

 

Present DMP Tool log in process:

 

  1. Begin at https://dmptool.org/user_sessions/institution
  1. From the drop-down list, select ‘University of Georgia’ as the institution
  1. Enter the user name and password selected at the time the DMPTool account was created by the user.
  1. You are now logged in to their DMPTool account

 

Once the authentication is switched, it will look like this on Friday, May 22, 2015:

 

  1. Begin at   https://dmptool.org/user_sessions/institution
  1. From the drop-down list, select ‘University of Georgia’ as the institution
  1. The browser will be redirected to https://cas.uga.edu/cas/login
  1. The user will enter his UGA MyID and password
  1. The browser will redirect back to the user DMPTool
  1. They are logged into their DMPTool account

Construction advisory:  Baxter Street/Hull St. Deck entrance

May 6, 2015 – 12:17 PM - Jean Cleveland

This construction will affect traffic near the main entrance to the Hull St. Deck, located near  Baxter St. The Russell Special Collections Libraries are located on Hull Street:

Portions of Baxter and Finley Streets will be closed to through traffic at times during the extension of chilled water lines from the District Energy Plant on Newton Street to serve Russell and Brumby Halls. The project is projected to cross Baxter Street, resulting in its closure at the Newton/Cloverhurst intersection, from approximately May 11 through June 16. The project is projected to cross Finley Street, resulting in its closure between Baxter St. and Cloverhurst Ave., from approximately July 4 through July 28.


‘Love, Liberation and Escaping Slavery’

May 6, 2015 – 11:57 AM - Jean Cleveland

English professor Barbara McCaskill will speak on “The Rise and Fall of William and Ellen Craft, Fugitives from Slavery in Georgia,” based on her recent book from UGA Press, “Love, Liberation, and Escaping Slavery William and Ellen Craft in Cultural Memory” May 18 at 3 p.m. in room 285 of the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries.

A reception will f0llow. The event is open free to the public.

The spectacular 1848 escape of William and Ellen Craft (1824–1900; 1826–1891) from slavery in Macon, Georgia, is a dramatic story in the annals of American history. Ellen, who could pass for white, disguised herself as a gentleman slaveholder; William accompanied her as his “master’s” devoted slave valet; both traveled openly by train, steamship, and carriage to arrive in free Philadelphia on Christmas Day. In Love, Liberation, and Escaping Slavery, Barbara McCaskill revisits this dual escape and examines the collaborations and partnerships that characterized the Crafts’ activism for the next thirty years: in Boston, where they were on the run again after the passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law; in England; and in Reconstruction-era Georgia. McCaskill also provides a close reading of the Crafts’ only book, their memoir, Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom, published in 1860.

Yet as this study of key moments in the Crafts’ public lives argues, the early print archive—newspapers, periodicals, pamphlets, legal documents—fills gaps in their story by providing insight into how they navigated the challenges of freedom as reformers and educators, and it discloses the transatlantic British and American audiences’ changing reactions to them. By discussing such events as the 1878 court case that placed William’s character and reputation on trial, this book also invites readers to reconsider the Crafts’ triumphal story as one that is messy, unresolved, and bittersweet. An important episode in African American literature, history, and culture, this will be essential reading for teachers and students of the slave narrative genre and the transatlantic antislavery movement and for researchers investigating early American print culture.